Children

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Children

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2020-07-12, 8:02

Dutch:

0 baby
1 dreumes
2 and 3 peuter
4 and 5 kleuter

How about other languages? I don't even know what ages you use for toddler...
Native: Dutch
Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

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Aurinĭa
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Re: Children

Postby Aurinĭa » 2020-07-12, 21:39

Not trying to complicate matters before any other languages get involved, but:

Belgian Dutch:

0 baby
1 to 2.5 peuter
3 to 5 kleuter

:P

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Children

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2020-07-26, 13:44

Aurinĭa wrote:Not trying to complicate matters before any other languages get involved, but:

Belgian Dutch:

0 baby
1 to 2.5 peuter
3 to 5 kleuter

:P


No other languages got involved :wink:

I wonder if these names have got something to do with when children go to school, and when they don't need diapers anymore. I have got the impression that in the Netherlands kleuters are expected to be potty trained, so peuters usually are busy with potty training (and dreumeses aren't). In Belgium kleuters are younger but they are also expected to be potty trained earlier as they go to school earlier... What do you think?
Native: Dutch
Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

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mizuz
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Re: Children

Postby mizuz » 2020-07-26, 13:56

Italian:

0 bebè, neonato
1 to ~12 bambino

Linguaphile
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Re: Children

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-07-26, 16:25

I feel like it tends to be not so clear-cut, at least at certain ages. For example, some people would call a 4-year-old a preschooler, some would call him a toddler, and in some cases (in the U.S.) he may have already started kindergarten and wouldn't be called by either of those terms.

U.S. English:
newborn: 0-2months
infant: 0-1year (or 2months to 1year if "newborn" is used prior)
toddler: 1year to 3years (corresponds with the child learning to walk)
preschooler: 3years to 5years (child is potty-trained and walking, but not yet in kindergarten)
kindergartener: 5years to 6years (sometimes 4years to 5years; child is attending kindergarten)

Spanish:
bebé: 0-1year
niño: 1year and up, to about 12years or so (literally: "child")
There are other terms that can be used, such as párvulo for a child who goes to preschool (although this is considered a subclass of niño).

Estonian:
rinnalaps = imik: 0-1year (etymologically the age at which the child is nursing)
väikelaps: 1year to 3years (literally: "small child")
laps: 3years and up (but can also apply to 0-3years, as it just means "child")

Alternatively, in Estonian there is also this sequence (more formal usage than the above):
imik: 0-1year
maimik: 1year to 3years
koolieelik: 3years to 7years
kainik: 7years to 11years (sometimes to 12years)
mürsik: 11years to 15years

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linguoboy
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Re: Children

Postby linguoboy » 2020-07-26, 17:24

Linguaphile wrote:I feel like it tends to be not so clear-cut, at least at certain ages. For example, some people would call a 4-year-old a preschooler, some would call him a toddler, and in some cases (in the U.S.) he may have already started kindergarten and wouldn't be called by either of those terms.

Yeah, I found the strict age categories of Dutch pretty odd. Here we go by milestones: if you're toddling, you're a "toddler".

Linguaphile wrote:U.S. English:
newborn: 0-2months
infant: 0-1year (or 2months to 1year if "newborn" is used prior)
toddler: 1year to 3years (corresponds with the child learning to walk)

"Newborn" and "infant" are both rather technical terms to me--the kind you'd find in works on child development or on feeding instructions for formula or what-have-you. Most folks would call any child too small to toddle a "baby". Toddlers through kindergartners would also be "small children" or "young kids" for many purposes (e.g. "Parents of small children are asked to keep them on a leash at all times.")
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Linguaphile
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Re: Children

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-07-26, 17:30

linguoboy wrote:"Parents of small children are asked to keep them on a leash at all times."

Is this common in Chicago? :hmm:

:dunno:

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Children

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2020-07-26, 18:17

linguoboy wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I feel like it tends to be not so clear-cut, at least at certain ages. For example, some people would call a 4-year-old a preschooler, some would call him a toddler, and in some cases (in the U.S.) he may have already started kindergarten and wouldn't be called by either of those terms.

Yeah, I found the strict age categories of Dutch pretty odd. Here we go by milestones: if you're toddling, you're a "toddler".


I've made it stricter than it is, dreumes is a bit ambiguous, it's a child learning to walk and talk, usually you're 1 then. But 2 and 3 certainly is a peuter, and when you're going to school in first and second class you're certainly a kleuter (and 4 or 5 year old). Child can be used for all btw.

Linguaphile wrote:U.S. English:
newborn: 0-2months
infant: 0-1year (or 2months to 1year if "newborn" is used prior)
toddler: 1year to 3years (corresponds with the child learning to walk)

"Newborn" and "infant" are both rather technical terms to me--the kind you'd find in works on child development or on feeding instructions for formula or what-have-you. Most folks would call any child too small to toddle a "baby". Toddlers through kindergartners would also be "small children" or "young kids" for many purposes (e.g. "Parents of small children are asked to keep them on a leash at all times.")


Newborn is used in Dutch too, until three months. Two months seems really odd to me, as it is the word for the fourth semester. After three months things usually go easier, with two months you're still in the middle of cramps and crying and no-sleep...
Native: Dutch
Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

Linguaphile
Posts: 2906
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Children

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-07-26, 19:41

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Newborn is used in Dutch too, until three months. Two months seems really odd to me

It is not exact, but two months seems about right to me. I googled it and found several definitions that say two months, and also some that say 28 days. Some people might use it for less time than that, even.

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:as it is the word for the fourth semester

What do you mean by this? The word itself doesn't have anything to do with a fourth semester (in English; as far as I know).
I can see some logic in the idea that 9 months of pregnancy + 3 months after birth = one full year of development for the baby. Is that what you mean? That's a logical way to look at it but it hadn't occurred to me to think of it that way. I don't think it has any connection to the words.

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Children

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2020-07-26, 20:13

Linguaphile wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:as it is the word for the fourth semester

What do you mean by this? The word itself doesn't have anything to do with a fourth semester (in English; as far as I know).
I can see some logic in the idea that 9 months of pregnancy + 3 months after birth = one full year of development for the baby. Is that what you mean? That's a logical way to look at it but it hadn't occurred to me to think of it that way. I don't think it has any connection to the words.


The Dutch word for newborn is pasgeborene btw but newborn is more used now. Maybe other people use it for a shorter amount of time, I couldn't find a definition, just lots of advertisements for cloths.

And yeah, that's what fourth trimester (I always confuse these words but semester is wrong, it's trimester) mean, also for the pregnancy. It's a concept to comfort parents that it's normal they feel very bad, it helps to see the newborn as just the last phase of the pregnancy only outside the body.
Native: Dutch
Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

Linguaphile
Posts: 2906
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Children

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-07-26, 20:56

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:as it is the word for the fourth semester

What do you mean by this? The word itself doesn't have anything to do with a fourth semester (in English; as far as I know).
I can see some logic in the idea that 9 months of pregnancy + 3 months after birth = one full year of development for the baby. Is that what you mean? That's a logical way to look at it but it hadn't occurred to me to think of it that way. I don't think it has any connection to the words.


The Dutch word for newborn is pasgeborene btw but newborn is more used now. Maybe other people use it for a shorter amount of time, I couldn't find a definition, just lots of advertisements for cloths.

And yeah, that's what fourth trimester (I always confuse these words but semester is wrong, it's trimester) mean, also for the pregnancy. It's a concept to comfort parents that it's normal they feel very bad, it helps to see the newborn as just the last phase of the pregnancy only outside the body.

It totally makes sense. :mrgreen:


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