Getting hold of some money...

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CoBB
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Postby CoBB » 2004-09-24, 17:43

'To make money' is American English I think.
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A pő, ha engemély, kimár / De mindegegy, ha vildagár... / ...mert engemély mindet bagul, / Mint vélgaban a bégahur!...

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Postby arantha » 2004-09-25, 12:12

Danish: at tjene penge (to earn money) (but 'tjene' also means 'to serve', so... )
English: to earn money
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (tjena is Danish loan, at vinna = to win/make)
German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to earn money, but the semantics are not clear with me, at least 'tjäna' is a cognate with the German dienen)

Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to win money)
Serbian imperfective aspect: зарађивати новац [zarađivati novac]
Serbian perfective aspect: зарадити новац [zaraditi novac]
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (special verb)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (special verb but close to "make money")

Turkish: para kazanmak (kazanmak can also mean "to win" comme en francais)

Chinese:挣钱 (zhèng qián ) or 赚钱 (zhuàn qián )
and the traditional character is :掙錢 賺錢

Basque : the verb is (dirua) irabazi which means : to win, to earn, to demand, to deserve, to overcome, to defeat (wow what a mess... so many things to do for the daily bread... which is egunoroko ogi(a) in Basque btw). Basque, albeit non IE, shares more or less the same concept with other IE languages.BTW (bis) can't "to make money" be also said in English ?
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Postby Geist » 2004-09-25, 19:17

CoBB the Generous wrote:'To make money' is American English I think.

Yes, that's correct.
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Postby Giraffa » 2004-09-25, 20:58

Serbian perfective aspect: зарадити новац [zaraditi novac]
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (special verb)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (special verb but close to "make money")


in Russian the verb зарабатывать means work for, as in srpski. And the polish verb has the same root. Slavic ppl were used to WORK FOR money :wink:

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Postby CoBB » 2004-09-25, 21:05

That's why the Russian word for 'week' means something like 'no work to do'? :wink:
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A pő, ha engemély, kimár / De mindegegy, ha vildagár... / ...mert engemély mindet bagul, / Mint vélgaban a bégahur!...

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Postby Giraffa » 2004-09-25, 21:14

CoBB the Generous wrote:That's why the Russian word for 'week' means something like 'no work to do'? :wink:


8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) :D :D :D :D

I think that firstly the word denoted the only day off - Sunday, which was later substituted by Воскресенье (Resurrection)...

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-12-27, 7:21

Changing the order of these a bit; replacing, modifying, and/or correcting some of the translations so they're more consistent throughout the list without all the editorializing (if you really want to know what the users who contributed these translations had to say about them, you have the earlier posts in this thread to go off of anyway!); removing perfective aspect form for Serbian since at least the Russian and Polish forms are also imperfective; attempting literal translations for Chinese; and adding "to make money" and "to get money" for English (the Brits use these expressions, too!) + translations for Norwegian (Bokmål), Portuguese, Hindi, Urdu, Romani, Malayalam, and Swahili

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

h34
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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby h34 » 2017-12-27, 8:48

+ Meadow Mari.

In Mari, the verb ышташ can be translated as 'to make', 'to do' and 'to work'. German 'verdienen' means 'to deserve' in many contexts, and as it is derived from 'dienen' ('to serve'), I thought I could add both verbs so the similarities with Swedish, Norwegian Bokmål, Danish and Finnish become more obvious. (I wonder if there is a more literal translation of the Russian зарабатывать which would make the link with 'work' more obvious. Something like 'to work up money'?)

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn/deserve/serve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re:

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2017-12-27, 15:25

Zoroa"]Danish: at tjene penge (to earn money) (but 'tjene' also means 'to serve', so... )
English: to earn money
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (tjena is Danish loan, at vinna = to win/make)
Added Sardinian

German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to earn money, but the semantics are not clear with me, at least 'tjäna' is a cognate with the German dienen)

Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to win money)
Serbian imperfective aspect: зарађивати новац [zarađivati novac]
Serbian perfective aspect: зарадити новац [zaraditi novac]
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (special verb)

Turkish: para kazanmak (kazanmak can also mean "to win" comme en francais)

Chinese:挣钱 (zhèng qián ) or 赚钱 (zhuàn qián )
and the traditional character is :掙錢 賺錢

Basque : the verb is (dirua) irabazi which means : to win, to earn, to demand, to deserve, to overcome, to defeat (wow what a mess... so many things to do for the daily bread... which is egunoroko ogi(a) in Basque btw). Basque, albeit non IE, shares more or less the same concept with other IE languages.BTW (bis) can't "to make money" be also said in English ?

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Re: Re:

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-12-27, 16:35

+Estonian, Livonian, Votic, Võro, Hmong, Iu Mien (+ adding back Meadow Mari, Hindi, and others which were left out of the previous post, and re-ordering to put IE languages together)

Danish: at tjene penge (to earn money) (but 'tjene' also means 'to serve', so... )
English: to earn money
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (tjena is Danish loan, at vinna = to win/make)

German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to earn money, but the semantics are not clear with me, at least 'tjäna' is a cognate with the German dienen)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to win money)
Serbian imperfective aspect: зарађивати новац [zarađivati novac]
Serbian perfective aspect: зарадити новац [zaraditi novac]
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (special verb)

Turkish: para kazanmak (kazanmak can also mean "to win" comme en francais)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

Basque : the verb is (dirua) irabazi which means : to win, to earn, to demand, to deserve, to overcome, to defeat (wow what a mess... so many things to do for the daily bread... which is egunoroko ogi(a) in Basque btw). Basque, albeit non IE, shares more or less the same concept with other IE languages.BTW (bis) can't "to make money" be also said in English ?

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-12-27, 16:53

Okay (yikes :shock: ), trying this again, since all of vijayjohn's and h34's changes were lost in Homine.Sardu's post which I replied to. It was too many to try to add to my original post (I'd replied to Homine.Sardu's) so I'm starting over using h34's post and adding Homine.Sardu's addition (Sardinian) as well as mine (Estonian, Livonian, Votic, Võro, Hmong, Iu Mien).

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare denaro/soldi (to win money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-12-29, 17:33

Guadagnare doean't mean "win" in Italian, it literally means "earn", and we don't even add the word for "money", if you say guadagnare without further details, it's implied that you're talking about money.

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
German + Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

h34
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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby h34 » 2017-12-30, 4:23

+ Latvian.
► Show Spoiler

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby md0 » 2017-12-30, 5:57

+el, el-cy
I am adding just the most common 'metaphor', obviously there's some variation. The word for money can always be replaced by an amount of currency.


English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)
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Naava
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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby Naava » 2018-01-14, 22:44

Adding +Finnish tienata, which is a loan word from some Germanic language. I could not find its etymology on net, so I can't say if it's loaned from Swedish, German, Old German or something else.
It's possible to say either "tienata" or "tienata rahaa", which is why I put the "raha" (money) in parantheses.

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby Bernard » 2018-01-16, 8:25

+ Latin

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Latin: pecuniam facere (to make money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money).

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-02-05, 9:08

Attempting Arabic and moving Greek up to the list with the other Indo-European languages :)

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Latin: pecuniam facere (to make money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Arabic: كسب المال /kasaba l-maːl/ (to earn money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby Bernard » 2018-02-06, 9:15

Classical Greek

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Latin: pecuniam facere (to make money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)
Classical Greek: ἐργάζομαι ἀργύριον (I earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money; teenima also means 'to serve'; loanword from old Low German dēnen, in modern German dienen 'to serve'; related to Danish tjene and Swedish tjäna above, with the same meaning)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money; same meaning and etymology as Estonian above)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Arabic: كسب المال /kasaba l-maːl/ (to earn money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Simplified Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱 zhuàn qián (to gain money)
Traditional Chinese: 掙錢 or 賺錢

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times). I am guessing that since the Hmong people traditionally were self-sufficient, growing and making whatever they needed, the need to work for money was something only done in dire times when one's own harvest/catch was insufficient, this may be why the verb khwv is used. There is also txais tau nyiaj (to receive money), but this can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan.
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-06, 15:40

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Irish: airgead a dhéanamh/tuilleadh (to make/earn money)
Welsh: ennill arian (earn money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Latin: pecuniam facere (to make money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)
Classical Greek: ἐργάζομαι ἀργύριον (I earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Korean: 돈을 벌다 /ton ul pelta/ (to earn money)

Arabic: كسب المال /kasaba l-maːl/ (to earn money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱/掙錢 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱/賺錢 zhuàn qián (to gain money)

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times), txais tau nyiaj (to receive money [can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan])
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Getting hold of some money...

Postby Multiturquoise » 2018-06-06, 14:11

English: to earn money, to make money, to get money
Dutch + Afrikaans + Frisian: Geld verdienen (to earn money)
German: Geld verdienen (to earn money, to deserve money)
Swedish: att tjäna pengar (to serve money)
Norwegian (Bokmål): å tjene penger (to serve money)
Danish: at tjene penge (to serve money)
Faroese: at tjena/vinna pening (to serve/win money)

Irish: airgead a dhéanamh/tuilleadh (to make/earn money)
Welsh: ennill arian (earn money)

Catalan: guanyar diners (to win money)
French: gagner de l'argent (to win some money)
Italian: guadagnare (to earn)
Latin: pecuniam facere (to make money)
Portuguese: ganhar dinheiro (to win money)
Romanian: câștiga bani (to win money)
Sardinian : balanzare dinàri (to balance money)
Spanish: ganar dinero (to win money)

Bulgarian: печеля пари (to earn money)
Serbian: зарађивати новац/zarađivati novac (to earn money)
Russian: зарабатывать деньги (to earn money)
Polish: zarabiać pieniądze (to earn money)

Latvian: pelnīt naudu (to deserve money)

Greek, Greece: βγάζω λεφτά (από ...) ˈvɣazo lefˈta apo (intrans: I extract some money / trans: I get some money (out of X))
Cypriot Greek: φκάλλω ριάλλια (που ...) ˈfkɐlːɔ riˈaʎːɐ pu (same usage)
Classical Greek: ἐργάζομαι ἀργύριον (I earn money)

Hindi: पैसे कमाना [pɛˈse kəˈmana] (to acquire paisas)
Urdu: پیسے کمانا
Romani: kerav peske love (I make money for myself)

Basque: dirua irabazi (to win money)

Estonian: raha teenima (to earn money)
Finnish: ansaita rahaa (to deserve money), tienata (rahaa) (to earn money)
Hungarian: pénzt keresni (to look for money)
Livonian: rǭ pe’ļļõ (to earn money; pe’ļļõ also means 'to serve')
Meadow Mari: оксам ышташ (to do/make/work/work up money)
Votic: raha teeniä (to earn money)
Võro: rahha tii:n'mä (to earn money)

Turkish: para kazanmak (to win money)

Korean: 돈을 벌다 /ton ul pelta/ (to earn money)

Arabic: كسب المال /kasaba l-maːl/ (to earn money)

Malayalam: കാശ് സമ്പാദിക്കുക [ˈkaːɕɯ səmˈbaːd̪ikʲuga] (to acquire money)

Mandarin Chinese: 挣钱/掙錢 zhèng qián (to struggle (for) money) or 赚钱/賺錢 zhuàn qián (to gain money)

Hmong: khwv (to toil, to labor a long time, to work hard in difficult times), txais tau nyiaj (to receive money [can be used for other methods of receiving money as well, like a gift or a loan])
Iu Mien: zornc zinh (to earn/gain coins)

Swahili: kuchuma pesa (to gather money)
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