Pet Peeves

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Pet Peeves

Postby Gormur » 2005-07-19, 23:17

The usage of stupid as a comparative, e.g. "How stupid is that?", "That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard".

I hate it. :P

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Postby Stan » 2005-07-19, 23:46

spelling "lose" as "loose"
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Postby JackFrost » 2005-07-19, 23:48

Overusing "like".
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Postby Kirk » 2005-07-20, 0:28

Well I'm assuming the pet peeves we're talking about are pet peeves relate to language, based on what others have been saying here. While I think that, linguistically speaking, native-speaker forms are perfectly valid, if I remove my descriptivist hat for a second I do have to admit a couple of things bother me at least slightly. I can think of one right now:

"the reason is because..."

for some reason bothers me. I say

"the reason is that..."

A minor, silly thing, but such are pet peeves, I guess :)

Gormur wrote:The usage of stupid as a comparative, e.g. "How stupid is that?", "That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard".

I hate it.


Hehe--I do that sometimes.

JackFrost wrote:Overusing "like".


As discussed here, I'm an unashamed frequent user of "like"--I think it fills some semantic voids and expresses things in a certain way that's just often not possible by other means. That being said, it is kind of annoying if someone is using it in a formal speech or something and they said it so much (along with "um") that it's very noticeable and distracts from what they're saying. But for normal speech I run free with it, hehe. Hopefully I wouldn't be too annoying to you guys in person :oops:, but I understand the arbitrary nature of pet peeves so it's all good.
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Postby jonathan » 2005-07-20, 1:00

JackFrost wrote:Overusing "like".


!!!!!

Also, it REALLY annoys me when...

- People use apostrophes for plurals (ie. two dog's, a dozen egg's, etc.).

- People say "it's all good" in response to a complaint I make. I HATE IT!

- No offense to anyone here, but whenever I see "lol" or any such net acronyms.

- My steplady says "further," which she pronounces without the Rs, as in "fuhthuh."

- "Me and my friend went to the store." (any sentence constructed that way)

- Ya'll (which is funny, because I'm from Texas, so I hear it all the time... and I still can't get used to it).

But I think the most annoying thing is when people completely lack the interest or effort to better a language they are speaking, especially if it's their native language. It's like they say "that's good enough" and simply don't try, and I find that sad.
Last edited by jonathan on 2005-07-20, 1:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Patricia » 2005-07-20, 1:01

I will add one for Argentine Spanish: The use of "tipo que", which is quite similar to the overuse of "like" in English. I can't think of any examples right now.

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Postby Kirk » 2005-07-20, 1:38

Patricia wrote:I will add one for Argentine Spanish: The use of "tipo que", which is quite similar to the overuse of "like" in English. I can't think of any examples right now.


Haha! That makes me think of the sketch "Ricos y Mocosos" on the Argentine show "No hay 2 sin 3" (actors below)

Image




which always parodied such usage in Argentine Spanish:

"¿Che, todo bien?"
"¡seeee, todo bien!"

or

"¡Tipo que...na'!"

Or one of the songs from that show:

"Todo Bien
¿Todo bien?
Todo bien.
¿Todo bien?
Todo bien.
Todo bien,todo bien,todo bien.
¿Tipo que?,¿tipo que?
Todo bien,todo bien.
¿Tipo que?,¿tipo que?
Todo bien,todo bien."

Hehe--always makes me laugh. I heard "tipo" and "tipo que" often when I was in Argentina. I thought it was great, and reminded me of "like." The funny part is a lot of people make fun of it and then don't realize it when they do it themselves :) I had friends who would say, "oh look at the chetos (snobbish yuppies), saying "tipo que" all the time," and then they would do it themselves a couple minutes later wihtout realizing it ;)
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I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-07-20, 2:02

jonathan wrote:- "Me and my friend went to the store." (any sentence constructed that way)

Huh? How so? :?

- Ya'll (which is funny, because I'm from Texas, so I hear it all the time... and I still can't get used to it).

Tell me about it, I can't stand it.

- No offense to anyone here, but whenever I see "lol" or any such net acronyms.

I use "lol" all the times, but other net words...I rarely use it. But in some cases like in chat after I write long sentence of anything, it pisses me off when I get a simple reply of "lol" or "ok". :roll: Also, I hate it when people write to me purely in net slangs and shortcuts. "if u write like dis, u can stop talkin 2me n piss off." :evil:
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Postby jonathan » 2005-07-20, 5:15

JackFrost wrote:
jonathan wrote:- "Me and my friend went to the store." (any sentence constructed that way)

Huh? How so? :?


Well, that should be "My friend and I went to the store." You just have to visualize the sentence without the other person there, as you wouldn't say "Me went to the store."

But in some cases like in chat after I write long sentence of anything, it pisses me off when I get a simple reply of "lol" or "ok". :roll:


Yeah, I forgot to say the same thing-- I HATE when people respond online with "ok" after I write a very long or important thing. I hate to pour my heart out to someone and have them respond "ok." :x
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Postby Geist » 2005-07-20, 5:33

jonathan wrote:- People use apostrophes for plurals (ie. two dog's, a dozen egg's, etc.).


Or for the possessive of "it" (it's), instead of the "it is" contraction...
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Postby Stan » 2005-07-20, 5:47

jonathan wrote:- People use apostrophes for plurals (ie. two dog's, a dozen egg's, etc.).


I agree.
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Postby Patricia » 2005-07-20, 11:20

svenska84 wrote:Hehe--always makes me laugh. I heard "tipo" and "tipo que" often when I was in Argentina. I thought it was great, and reminded me of "like." The funny part is a lot of people make fun of it and then don't realize it when they do it themselves :) I had friends who would say, "oh look at the chetos (snobbish yuppies), saying "tipo que" all the time," and then they would do it themselves a couple minutes later wihtout realizing it ;)


You seem to be a lot more acquainted with it than me! lol! It's true, lots of people tend to use it, though there is a slight variant, which marks a difference from the "cheto" use... "Non-chetos" may say "tipo" alone, not "tipo que". I might use this latter variant myself sometimes. Also, it has a lot to do with the intonation, that's what ultimately defines the "cheto" variant from the other one. :wink:

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Postby Ariki » 2005-07-20, 12:07

Well, that should be "My friend and I went to the store." You just have to visualize the sentence without the other person there, as you wouldn't say "Me went to the store."


Both constructions are valid - what is grammatically correct, and one is native speaker.

I wonder what these pet peeves are based on? My pet peeve is when someone tries to get me to speak exactly the way they do....
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Postby FNORD » 2005-07-20, 12:53

Legal, a slang that can be used as any favorable adjective.

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Postby bender » 2005-07-20, 13:08

Patricia wrote:I will add one for Argentine Spanish: The use of "tipo que", which is quite similar to the overuse of "like" in English. I can't think of any examples right now.


"Tipo" is very used too in Brazilian Portuguese:

Eu, tipo, entrei lá e tipo não tinha nada né? Aí eu, tipo, pensei "tipo, não vai dar certo".

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Tipo, entenderam? :P
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Postby Malcolm » 2005-07-20, 14:10

Need translation :
Wtf is a pet peeve?

gormur wrote:The usage of stupid as a comparative, e.g. "How stupid is that?", "That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard".

I don't get it :?
Is it grammatically wrong or sth?
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Postby Zoroa » 2005-07-20, 14:20

Here is the nice Wiki's definition :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_peeve
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Postby Gormur » 2005-07-20, 18:04

svenska84 wrote: I'm an unashamed frequent user of "like"--I think it fills some semantic voids and expresses things in a certain way that's just often not possible by other means.


Like, totally. 8) I seem to always use these words/phrases in conversation: exactly, totally, like, no way, for sure...and I still sometimes greet my friends with 'hey dude'... :P

Of course, I use some imperatives like 'geeze' or 'gee', 'ishda', uff, gad, which I think come from family influence and living in Canada. :wink:

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Postby Kirk » 2005-07-20, 21:26

Patricia wrote:
svenska84 wrote:Hehe--always makes me laugh. I heard "tipo" and "tipo que" often when I was in Argentina. I thought it was great, and reminded me of "like." The funny part is a lot of people make fun of it and then don't realize it when they do it themselves :) I had friends who would say, "oh look at the chetos (snobbish yuppies), saying "tipo que" all the time," and then they would do it themselves a couple minutes later wihtout realizing it ;)


You seem to be a lot more acquainted with it than me! lol! It's true, lots of people tend to use it, though there is a slight variant, which marks a difference from the "cheto" use... "Non-chetos" may say "tipo" alone, not "tipo que". I might use this latter variant myself sometimes. Also, it has a lot to do with the intonation, that's what ultimately defines the "cheto" variant from the other one. :wink:


Ah, thanks for the information!--yeah, I was only starting to pick up on the subtleties of what was considered "cheto" speech before I had to go back to the US. In the beginning, it all just sounded like Argentine Spanish to me, but in the months I was there I started to be able to pick out some of the differences in the various dialects as related to socioeconomic status.

Gormur wrote:svenska84 wrote:
I'm an unashamed frequent user of "like"--I think it fills some semantic voids and expresses things in a certain way that's just often not possible by other means.


Like, totally. Cool I seem to always use these words/phrases in conversation: exactly, totally, like, no way, for sure...and I still sometimes greet my friends with 'hey dude'... Razz

Of course, I use some imperatives like 'geeze' or 'gee', 'ishda', uff, gad, which I think come from family influence and living in Canada.


Hehe--I haven't heard of "isha" "uff" "gad" (is that like "God"?). In terms of "dude," I actually don't seem to use it as often as some of my friends do, but, like you said, there are just some occasions that call for a good "hey dude." :)

bender wrote:Patricia wrote:
I will add one for Argentine Spanish: The use of "tipo que", which is quite similar to the overuse of "like" in English. I can't think of any examples right now.


"Tipo" is very used too in Brazilian Portuguese:

Eu, tipo, entrei lá e tipo não tinha nada né? Aí eu, tipo, pensei "tipo, não vai dar certo".

Laughing Laughing Laughing

Tipo, entenderam?


Tipo, si! Haha...I didn't realize it could be so prevalent there, too.
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.

I eat prescriptivists for breakfast.

maɪ nemz kʰɜ˞kʰ n̩ aɪ laɪk̚ fɨˈnɛ̞ɾɪ̞ks

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Postby jonathan » 2005-07-20, 22:06

riki wrote:
Well, that should be "My friend and I went to the store." You just have to visualize the sentence without the other person there, as you wouldn't say "Me went to the store."


Both constructions are valid - what is grammatically correct, and one is native speaker.


Huh? No, "Me and my friend went to the store" would never be correct. Who told you that?
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