Gender and language

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Linguaphile
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Re: Gender and language

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-27, 0:35

dEhiN wrote:For police and firefighters, would something like "firefighter" or "police officer" work? In English we also use police to refer to both the officers and the overall force.

Just realized that no one answered this. Yes, this is already done: in Finnish poliisi for both the officers and the force, in Estonian politsei for the force and politseinik for an individual officer.
For "firefighter," Finnish has pelastaja (rescuer) but it's not common; Estonian has the above-mentioned tuletõrjuja (one who drives away or repels fires, not much different from "firefighter") and päästja (rescuer).
All of these are gender-neutral.

dEhiN wrote:Does Finnish has a language regulatory body that could or would dictate on these sorts of language changes?

Yes, Kotus.

I thought of a word in Estonian which is usually gender-specific, which is the word for "team". Meeskond is a male team and naiskond is a female team. You can also say võistkond which is gender-neutral, but it is specific to competitive teams so, for example, it does not work for the sort of "teamwork" or "team" where a team of people are simply working together toward a common goal, without a rival team. (The "võist-" part of võistkond refers to competition or rivalry.)
Some people use meeskond regardless of gender, but mees means "man".
There are ways around this: some people use the loanword tiim; a team working together can be töörühm (workgroup); teamwork can be ühistöö (collective work) instead of meeskonnatöö, and so on. These are gender-neutral.

On another note related to gender, as of today, Estonia is the only country in the world with both a female president and a female prime minister (president Kersti Kaljulaid, prime minister Kaja Kallas).

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dEhiN
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Re: Gender and language

Postby dEhiN » 2021-01-27, 1:57

Linguaphile wrote:I thought of a word in Estonian which is usually gender-specific, which is the word for "team". Meeskond is a male team and naiskond is a female team. You can also say võistkond which is gender-neutral, but it is specific to competitive teams so, for example, it does not work for the sort of "teamwork" or "team" where a team of people are simply working together toward a common goal, without a rival team. (The "võist-" part of võistkond refers to competition or rivalry.)
Some people use meeskond regardless of gender, but mees means "man".
There are ways around this: some people use the loanword tiim; a team working together can be töörühm (workgroup); teamwork can be ühistöö (collective work) instead of meeskonnatöö, and so on. These are gender-neutral.

So what would commonly be used in an office situation? Like, in English one might frequently say, "the IT team" or "the marketing team" in general parlance.
N: (en-ca)
B1: (fr)
A1: (pt-br) (es) ((ta-lk))
A0: (gl) (cy) ((sv) (ro))
Brackets indicate no active study

Linguaphile
Posts: 3290
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Gender and language

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-27, 2:21

dEhiN wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I thought of a word in Estonian which is usually gender-specific, which is the word for "team". Meeskond is a male team and naiskond is a female team. You can also say võistkond which is gender-neutral, but it is specific to competitive teams so, for example, it does not work for the sort of "teamwork" or "team" where a team of people are simply working together toward a common goal, without a rival team. (The "võist-" part of võistkond refers to competition or rivalry.)
Some people use meeskond regardless of gender, but mees means "man".
There are ways around this: some people use the loanword tiim; a team working together can be töörühm (workgroup); teamwork can be ühistöö (collective work) instead of meeskonnatöö, and so on. These are gender-neutral.

So what would commonly be used in an office situation? Like, in English one might frequently say, "the IT team" or "the marketing team" in general parlance.

You just don't have to call them a team. Usually they are a group (rühm) or department (osakond) or branch (valdkond) or workgroup (töörühm). So you can say, for example, turundusosakond ("marketing department"), turundusvaldkond ("marketing branch"), IT-osakond ("IT department"), eksperdirühm ("group of experts" for "team of experts") and so on.


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