Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-11, 14:50

indung mutiara mother-of-pearl

Indung seems to be a variant of induk "dam; mother [of animals]", but I don't know if this is a calque or a parallel development.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-02-13, 14:59

(pt-br) lele da cuca - slang term for doido, maluco (crazy)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-20, 9:42

(fr) compléter v - complete; complement

I already knew this word for the "complete" meaning, but not the idea of "complement", two or more things/people that together form a whole or that have well-matched strengths and weaknesses. I noticed that sense while watching a book-recommendation video from YouTuber Émile Roy.

Émile Roy wrote:Donc c'est important de recommander des livres qui se complètent, qui ont pas toutes les mêmes opinions, la même vision politique, la même vision du monde, qui ont des voix qui se répondent, qui se complètent.

So it's important to recommend books that complement each other, that don't have all the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-20, 21:34

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) compléter v - complete; complement

I didn't know that meaning either, so I just learned something!

Dormouse559 wrote:
Émile Roy wrote:Donc c'est important de recommander des livres qui se complètent, qui ont pas toutes les mêmes opinions, la même vision politique, la même vision du monde, qui ont des voix qui se répondent, qui se complètent.

So it's important to recommend books that complement each other, that don't have all the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other.

I think this is one aspect of French syntactic grammar that has always confused me - considering several clauses put together a valid sentence even when some of the clauses are contrastive but no contrastive conjunction is used. For example, if I were writing that in English, I would've naturally said, "... that don't all have the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, but that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other." As such, if I were to write that in French, I would've used mais and done the same thing. It confuses me that in French, the word mais isn't required. When I was a beginner learner, I didn't understand how French could have a grammatical structure like that. Now, of course, I'm more used to it and I know that grammatical structures vary across languages, but what confuses me today is how to write like that in French. When could I write two clauses that are contrastive side by side without a constrastive conjunction, and when do I need to add a word like mais?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-20, 22:47

dEhiN wrote:I think this is one aspect of French syntactic grammar that has always confused me - considering several clauses put together a valid sentence even when some of the clauses are contrastive but no contrastive conjunction is used. For example, if I were writing that in English, I would've naturally said, "... that don't all have the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, but that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other." As such, if I were to write that in French, I would've used mais and done the same thing. It confuses me that in French, the word mais isn't required. When I was a beginner learner, I didn't understand how French could have a grammatical structure like that. Now, of course, I'm more used to it and I know that grammatical structures vary across languages, but what confuses me today is how to write like that in French. When could I write two clauses that are contrastive side by side without a constrastive conjunction, and when do I need to add a word like mais?

It's possible to leave out conjunctions in English too. That's why I also did it in my translation. I think in both languages, it's a natural result of speaking off the top of your head. I'd say adding "but/mais" specifically is an option here but not necessary. It depends on how you interpret the the negative in the first subordinate clause. Are you saying "they do not do x and instead of that do y", or are you saying "they both (a) do not do x and (b) do do y"?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-02-21, 16:13

(pt-br) sortelégio - sortilege
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-02-25, 20:43

(pt-pt) registo - register, registration (registro in Brazilian Portuguese)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-25, 21:10

(pt-BR) redário a place to hang a hammock (rede)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Osias » 2021-02-28, 2:19

Never seen that, I just call it 'gancho' = 'hook'. But it makes sense and it's probably well used.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby vijayjohn » 2021-02-28, 14:11

Hungarian (hu) ember - mankind, human being, person
Finnish (fi) lippu - flag
Chukchi (ckt) [təˈmejŋəˈlevtəpəɣtəɻkən] - I have a fierce headache
Central Siberian Yupik (ypk-ESS) angyaghllangyuqtuq(lla) [aŋˈɣjaɣhɬaŋɣjuqtuq]([ɬa]) - (also), he/she wants to acquire a big boat

(All from the same book btw)

EDIT: Oh, also:
schnaz wrote:kwe hello in the Algonquin language
http://www.hilaroad.com/camp/nation/hello1.wav

Not just in Algonquin. This word seems pretty common throughout much of the East Coast.
EDIT2: Fixed the first two words per Linguaphile's post below (yes, they are all from a linguistics book) :)
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2021-02-28, 17:53, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-02-28, 16:03

vijayjohn wrote:Hungarian (hu) ember - man
Estonian (et) lippu - flag

vijayjohn wrote:(All from the same book btw)

Is it a linguistics book?
It's interesting that they use the from lippu. That is the partitive singular and also illative singular of lipp, so "[some] flags", "into the flag" etc. Lipp is the nominative singular.
Ember does mean "man" in the sense of "mankind, human being, person" but not in the sense of "male".

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-28, 16:25

(ca) esplugabous cattle egret
(ga) iarmhairt consequence
(cy) ofergoel a superstition
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby dEhiN » 2021-03-03, 21:35

(fr) le cours numérique digital course
(fr) le marque-page bookmark
(fr) la citoyenneté netizen (i.e., citizen of the Internet)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-03-04, 17:08

dEhiN wrote:(fr) la citoyenneté netizen (i.e., citizen of the Internet)

Citoyenneté means "citizenship". The usual word for "netizen" is internaute.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-03-05, 14:34

(pt-br) estanho tin (element)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby dEhiN » 2021-03-05, 15:47

Dormouse559 wrote:
dEhiN wrote:(fr) la citoyenneté netizen (i.e., citizen of the Internet)

Citoyenneté means "citizenship". The usual word for "netizen" is internaute.

Oh ok! My mistake, I was mixing up with citoyen which is just "citizen". Thanks for the correction. :D
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby dEhiN » 2021-03-05, 15:51

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) estanho tin (element)

Is a different word used when referring to the product material, like a tin can?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-03-05, 18:33

dEhiN wrote:
Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) estanho tin (element)

Is a different word used when referring to the product material, like a tin can?


Yes, a tin can is uma lata. Most latas nowadays are made alumínio, so there's no connection to the material "tin" in the name in Portuguese. The further I dig into the word lata though, the more confused I get. My wife insists that lata to her just means "can", that you can't describe something as being made of "lata" (e.g. foi feito de lata) any more than we can say "it was made of can". And linguee seems to agree mostly, with "bairro de lata" as a set phrase being the only use that even looks like it might take "lata" to mean some kind of material. I saw some discussion on a WordReference forum where a translator, who seemed to be a native PT-PT speaker, was considering if "banheira de lata" or "banheira de estanho" were appropriate translations for "tin bathtub", which implies she didn't dismiss "banheira de lata" out of hand as ridiculous, but that's about the only evidence I have for "lata" as referring to a material rather than a receptical. I think the fact that "latão" exists with the meaning "brass, copper" makes me think that at some point "lata" must have referred to a material...

EDIT: So, according to Wiktionary, latão comes from Arabic 'lātūn', from Turkish 'altln', whereas lata comes from Italian 'latta', from Old High German 'latta', so there's ni connection.
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