Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

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Linguaphile
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-04, 22:49

linguoboy wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:With that type of reading, I almost always try to gain some background knowledge about it by reading in English on the same topic before reading about it in a language I know less well. For one thing, for the types of words you're talking about, often even in English when writing about it they'll use the native words, so you'll learn them. And then of course it helps to have the background knowledge even when that isn't the case.

He lulled me into a false complacency by not going into details for the first 100+ pages of the novel

LOL

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-04, 22:57

Linguaphile wrote:LOL

Honestly, that's one of my frustrations with Roberts. It's not always clear what's important for understanding the story and what's just colourtext. At first I was reading very closely and trying to remember as much as possible. But then he wasted my time with some absurdist nonsense in Italy and I decided to read more for speed. Now I guess that's catching up with me again.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-06, 16:45

(es-ar) pelela child's potty chair

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-01-06, 23:58

(fr)
au forceps adv - painfully, arduously
haletant adj - breathless, panting; (figuratively) gripping

Le Soir wrote:Etats-Unis: suspense haletant en Géorgie, probable victoire démocrate au forceps
United States: gripping suspense in Georgia, likely Democratic victory hard won
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby schnaz » 2021-01-08, 6:45

kwe hello in the Algonquin language
http://www.hilaroad.com/camp/nation/hello1.wav
I am already against our next war. https://www.antiwar.com/

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Multiturquoise » 2021-01-08, 20:54

(en) Goonerette

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linguoboy
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-12, 22:56

(ca) congesta

I always enjoy learning foreign terms that have no close equivalents in English. A congesta is an accumulation of snow in a high-altitude clotada (another word without a close English equivalent; it means an area that is low-lying compared to the terrain around it and can designate anything from a relatively flat expanse connecting two valleys to a steep narrow gulch). It's glossed in various sources as "snowdrift" or "snowbank", but these are just masses of snow that can occur at any altitude and on any sort of terrain. I was curious if I could find a technical term in glaciology that corresponded to congesta but there doesn't seem to be one.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-12, 23:45

linguoboy wrote:(ca) congesta

I always enjoy learning foreign terms that have no close equivalents in English. A congesta is an accumulation of snow in a high-altitude clotada (another word without a close English equivalent; it means an area that is low-lying compared to the terrain around it and can designate anything from a relatively flat expanse connecting two valleys to a steep narrow gulch). It's glossed in various sources as "snowdrift" or "snowbank", but these are just masses of snow that can occur at any altitude and on any sort of terrain. I was curious if I could find a technical term in glaciology that corresponded to congesta but there doesn't seem to be one.


Could the altitude thing not be down to Catalan-speaking areas not generally having much snow outside of higher altitude areas?
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-13, 2:08

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:Could the altitude thing not be down to Catalan-speaking areas not generally having much snow outside of higher altitude areas?

Sure, the meaning of the term is rooted in the geography and climate of the Catalan-speaking areas. But when it comes to describing accumulations of snow at lower altitudes in places like Moscow or New York, Catalan-speakers seem to prefer other expressions like pila de neu instead of extending the meaning of congesta. Furthermore, Spanish is spoken natively over a wider geographic range and it has its own word (ventisquero) for the same concept, one also not used to described snow and ice collecting at lower altitudes.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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