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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-15, 11:06
by linguoboy
Woods wrote:knappenål (Danish) - a pin that you use to stick a piece of paper at the ad board in a supermarket

IOW, a pushpin.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-15, 15:19
by Woods
linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:knappenål (Danish) - a pin that you use to stick a piece of paper at the ad board in a supermarket

IOW, a pushpin.

Yup! That comes as my newest word now, cause I'd never heard anyone talk of those in English so far.

Even though the Google Image' results in Danish seem to show more frequently than those some sort of a needle with a little round thing on top:

https://www.google.com/search?q=knappen%C3%A5l&client=firefox-b-e&sxsrf=ALeKk03MpFUXeB_KxdrTkmfnKtNLS98TQQ:1605453449574&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjhtcKU7ITtAhUhxosKHSx2DMMQ_AUoAXoECA4QAw&biw=1252&bih=556

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-15, 20:30
by md0
Cypriot Turkish gayabarçası (piece of rock) ~= Cypriot Greek τούτος ο ρότσος (this rock): self-deprecating term for Cyprus

Glad to find out we agree on the terminology :)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-16, 6:47
by Allekanger
md0 wrote:Cypriot Turkish gayabarçası (piece of rock) ~= Cypriot Greek τούτος ο ρότσος (this rock): self-deprecating term for Cyprus

Glad to find out we agree on the terminology :)

I clumsily connected ρότσος with Ρόδος, thinking for a moment that Greek speaking Cypriots used the name of another island as the self-deprecating term :whistle:

lacklustre (English) - 'lacking in vitality, force, or conviction; uninspired or uninspiring'

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-17, 17:54
by oho
(es) ladino - cunning (hmm is that kind of anti-semitic? :hmm: )

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-17, 20:23
by Yasna
oho wrote:(es) ladino - cunning (hmm is that kind of anti-semitic? :hmm: )

Apparently not.

"Inherited from Latin latīnus; compare latín, latino, doublets which were borrowed later. Compare also Portuguese ladino (“learned, cultured”). The sense of "astute" or "crafty" developed from medieval times, when the word was used to describe scholars and learned people, who were familiar with Latin and were involved in a process of "Latinization", i.e. using and incorporating learned terms. It was also used as a general designation for Romance speakers in the Middle Ages, as opposed to others speaking different kinds of languages, especially Arabic in the context of Spain/Iberia (compare the name of Ladino, the Sephardic Jewish language of Spain, descended from a form of Old Spanish, as well as the Ladin of northern Italy)."

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ladino#Spanish

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-17, 20:29
by oho
Thanks!

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-20, 6:21
by Sarabi
skikk - custom på norsk

Jeg har en ny språkblogg for å øve språk, så har jeg øvd dette ordet der.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-29, 7:24
by Dormouse559
(fr) jusqu'au-boutisme nm - extremism, hardline stance (< jusqu'au bout "all the way; to the bitter end")

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-11-30, 20:58
by linguoboy
(ca) viola de bruixa intermediate periwinkle [Vinca difformis]
(cy) isgwmni subsidiary
(fr) écouillé emasculated
(de) (Alemmanic) Sermde bundle of twigs

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-12-07, 22:40
by linguoboy
(cy) argaen veneer (which is feminine even though the root word caen "covering" is masculine; ah, languages!)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-12-16, 5:57
by schnaz
🇨🇳


竖弯钩 shu4wan1gou1 a stroke ( brush or pen) used to form a Chinese character and it looks like this: 乚. 竖 means vertical. 弯 means bend. 钩 means hook.
Used for example in the character 元 yuan2 meaning first.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2020-12-28, 18:30
by Linguaphile
(es-AR) colimba draft, mandatory military service

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-01, 18:07
by Linguaphile
(es-AR) piantado crazy, nutcase

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-03, 1:00
by Linguaphile
(hmn) cogci fabric strips decorated with sequins and triangular edging

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-03, 1:29
by linguoboy
(cy) gwythwch wild sow

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-04, 17:36
by Linguaphile
(es-ar) garúa drizzle, sprinkle, light rain (this is used throughout Latin America so I've probably heard it before, but I generally use llovizna)
(es-ar) piloto de lluvia raincoat

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-04, 20:07
by linguoboy
(cy) priodolder proprietary right of possession of land

I've gotten back to reading Y pla and hit a paragraph that I realised didn't make much sense at all without some understanding of the mediaeval system of land tenure in Wales. In particular, I was baffled by the presence of the word gwely, the usual equivalent of "bed", until I found out that it also refers to lands held in common by a kin grouping. Priodolder looks like it should mean "propriety" (and it does in some contexts), but here it was referring to the right of certain individuals to portions of a gwely.

It makes me wonder what other passages I might have misunderstood because I was parsing some other words with their common meanings rather than the specialised ones they might have in the native legal system.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-04, 22:01
by Linguaphile
linguoboy wrote:didn't make much sense at all without some understanding of the mediaeval system of land tenure in Wales. In particular, I was baffled by the presence of the word gwely, the usual equivalent of "bed", until I found out that it also refers to lands held in common by a kin grouping. Priodolder looks like it should mean "propriety" (and it does in some contexts), but here it was referring to the right of certain individuals to portions of a gwely.

It makes me wonder what other passages I might have misunderstood because I was parsing some other words with their common meanings rather than the specialised ones they might have in the native legal system.

With that type of reading, I almost always try to gain some background knowledge about it by reading in English on the same topic before reading about it in a language I know less well. For one thing, for the types of words you're talking about, often even in English when writing about it they'll use the native words, so you'll learn them. And then of course it helps to have the background knowledge even when that isn't the case.
It's one of those language-teaching principles that I try to apply to my own learning as well: use familiar language to learn unfamiliar concepts, use familiar concepts to learn unfamiliar language.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Posted: 2021-01-04, 22:29
by linguoboy
Linguaphile wrote:With that type of reading, I almost always try to gain some background knowledge about it by reading in English on the same topic before reading about it in a language I know less well. For one thing, for the types of words you're talking about, often even in English when writing about it they'll use the native words, so you'll learn them. And then of course it helps to have the background knowledge even when that isn't the case.

He lulled me into a false complacency by not going into details for the first 100+ pages of the novel. Up to now, it's been common feudal concepts like "manor", "serf", "regent", etc. so I didn't think I needed much specialised background. But now I've dusted off Davies' History of Wales and I'm reading the chapters from the Edwardian Conquest forward (though I think I'll probably need to go back as far as Hywel Dda to grok the intricacies of land tenure).