Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

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linguoboy
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-11, 14:50

indung mutiara mother-of-pearl

Indung seems to be a variant of induk "dam; mother [of animals]", but I don't know if this is a calque or a parallel development.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-02-13, 14:59

(pt-br) lele da cuca - slang term for doido, maluco (crazy)
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-20, 9:42

(fr) compléter v - complete; complement

I already knew this word for the "complete" meaning, but not the idea of "complement", two or more things/people that together form a whole or that have well-matched strengths and weaknesses. I noticed that sense while watching a book-recommendation video from YouTuber Émile Roy.

Émile Roy wrote:Donc c'est important de recommander des livres qui se complètent, qui ont pas toutes les mêmes opinions, la même vision politique, la même vision du monde, qui ont des voix qui se répondent, qui se complètent.

So it's important to recommend books that complement each other, that don't have all the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-20, 21:34

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) compléter v - complete; complement

I didn't know that meaning either, so I just learned something!

Dormouse559 wrote:
Émile Roy wrote:Donc c'est important de recommander des livres qui se complètent, qui ont pas toutes les mêmes opinions, la même vision politique, la même vision du monde, qui ont des voix qui se répondent, qui se complètent.

So it's important to recommend books that complement each other, that don't have all the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other.

I think this is one aspect of French syntactic grammar that has always confused me - considering several clauses put together a valid sentence even when some of the clauses are contrastive but no contrastive conjunction is used. For example, if I were writing that in English, I would've naturally said, "... that don't all have the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, but that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other." As such, if I were to write that in French, I would've used mais and done the same thing. It confuses me that in French, the word mais isn't required. When I was a beginner learner, I didn't understand how French could have a grammatical structure like that. Now, of course, I'm more used to it and I know that grammatical structures vary across languages, but what confuses me today is how to write like that in French. When could I write two clauses that are contrastive side by side without a constrastive conjunction, and when do I need to add a word like mais?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-20, 22:47

dEhiN wrote:I think this is one aspect of French syntactic grammar that has always confused me - considering several clauses put together a valid sentence even when some of the clauses are contrastive but no contrastive conjunction is used. For example, if I were writing that in English, I would've naturally said, "... that don't all have the same opinions, the same political views, the same worldview, but that have voices that answer each other, that complement each other." As such, if I were to write that in French, I would've used mais and done the same thing. It confuses me that in French, the word mais isn't required. When I was a beginner learner, I didn't understand how French could have a grammatical structure like that. Now, of course, I'm more used to it and I know that grammatical structures vary across languages, but what confuses me today is how to write like that in French. When could I write two clauses that are contrastive side by side without a constrastive conjunction, and when do I need to add a word like mais?

It's possible to leave out conjunctions in English too. That's why I also did it in my translation. I think in both languages, it's a natural result of speaking off the top of your head. I'd say adding "but/mais" specifically is an option here but not necessary. It depends on how you interpret the the negative in the first subordinate clause. Are you saying "they do not do x and instead of that do y", or are you saying "they both (a) do not do x and (b) do do y"?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-02-21, 16:13

(pt-br) sortelégio - sortilege
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12


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