Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

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Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Ashucky » 2020-01-17, 21:36

Continuation of the Last word in a foreign language that you learnt thread, which can now be found in the Forum Archives. If you want to continue a conversation or a discussion from the old thread, post a quote and/or a link to the relevant post here.

What's the last word (or words) in a foreign language that you've learnt? Please provide the language, the word, and context if possible.
Slovenščina (sl)English (en)Italiano (it)漢語 (zh)Español (es)Suomi (fi)Svenska (sv)日本語 (ja)فارسی (fa)Nešili (hit)
The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
Največji sovražnik znanja ni nevednost, marveč iluzija znanja.

Synalepha

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-19, 22:35

(lld) rascia - rush

I'm intrigued by the similarity. I suppose rascia is cognate with (or a borrowing from) the French word that gave "rush" to English (i.e: ruser)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-22, 0:30

(haw) pu’uone pond near the shore
(haw) pu’u one sand dune
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Synalepha

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-23, 9:23

(lld) purana - soul in purgatory
(lld) nzaul - somewhere

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-01-26, 22:54

(es) calabaza - pumpkin
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-28, 14:27

(haw) leokani vowel
(haw) leokanipū consonant
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Synalepha

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-28, 17:55

Samoan

a'aa'a - to kick repeatedly

English

maelstrom - a powerful often violent whirlpool sucking in objects within a given radius

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-04, 21:09

(haw) kūkae faeces
(ga) meamram memorandum
(fr) museau muzzle
(mi) tiriti treaty
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-02-11, 22:50

(fr)
banc des accusés nm - prisoner's dock
en filigrane - (adjectival) watermarked; implicit (adverbial) implicitly
sommité nf - luminary
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-11, 23:05

(ko) 몰카 hidden camera (or footage from one)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Synalepha

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Synalepha » 2020-02-12, 8:24

English (Scotland, N. England)

lass - girl

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Luís » 2020-02-12, 9:50

(en) sinew a piece of tough fibrous tissue uniting muscle to bone; a tendon or ligament.
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-02-13, 2:56

(nan) 拋拋走 (pha-pha-tsáu) to rush around
(nan) 袂和 (bē-hô) not worth it
(nan) 剉咧等 (tshuah leh tán) waiting in fear and trepidation
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Naava » 2020-02-14, 17:24

(en)
sprig - a single small plant stem with leaves on it
rasher - a thin flat piece of bacon

I may or may not have been watching this. :mrgreen:

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-02-15, 19:31

(es) (es-MX)
avilantarse to be insolent
manirrotura spendthriftness, extravagance
servirse con la cuchara grande to look out for oneself first, to look out for number one
sainetero sketch writer, writer of sainetes (comic opera pieces)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-02-19, 22:02

(zh) 脏辫 (zang bian, literally "filthy braids") dreadlocks

Couldn't have come up with a more fitting term if I tried.
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-19, 22:13

Yasna wrote:(zh) 脏辫 (zang bian, literally "filthy braids") dreadlocks

Couldn't have come up with a more fitting term if I tried.

I guess you're using "fitting" here in the special sense of "inaccurate"?

Are dreadlocks dirty?

Simple answer, No.

Dreadlocks inherently are not any different than unlocked hair. They are just hair that has felted together. There has been a myth that if you don't wash your hair, that is how you will get dreadlocks, that is actually pretty far from the truth because a personas natural oils make the hair slippery and cause them to not lock, that is why folks would put things like bees wax or honey in their hair to get dreads to form, in what has been called the "neglect" method.

Source: https://www.quora.com/Are-dreadlocks-dirty. (Plus, you know, anybody you know with dreadlocks. Which, in your case, is how many people?)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-02-19, 23:49

linguoboy wrote:
Are dreadlocks dirty?

Simple answer, No.
[...]

Source: https://www.quora.com/Are-dreadlocks-dirty. (Plus, you know, anybody you know with dreadlocks. Which, in your case, is how many people?)


The issue isn't that they are inherently filthy, it's that they require such high maintenance that many people don't manage to keep them clean. Take it from someone with a keen sense of smell who often rides in crowded trains. Or just read the reply directly below the one you quoted.

Honestly, mine are filty, and if I am in the bush for weeks, my dreads start to stink if they get wet. I have to use coconut oil, shampoo etc etc and wash each dread out properly.

If I find a good waterfall, or a great storm with lots of rain pouring of roofs top or any catchment system, I will use that time to really give my dreads a good wash.

yes, dreadlocks are dirty. Regular washing is highly recommended ( and just common sense as well)
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-02-20, 12:44

Yasna wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Are dreadlocks dirty?

Simple answer, No.
[...]

Source: https://www.quora.com/Are-dreadlocks-dirty. (Plus, you know, anybody you know with dreadlocks. Which, in your case, is how many people?)


The issue isn't that they are inherently filthy, it's that they require such high maintenance that many people don't manage to keep them clean. Take it from someone with a keen sense of smell who often rides in crowded trains. Or just read the reply directly below the one you quoted.


If people don't manage to keep them clean, the issue is not with the dread-locks, it's with the people.
People who really care about it take care of them, go to the hairdresser or someone they know to turn them (not sure if you say it like this in English?) when hair starts growing, and wash them to keep them clean.
It's totally doable.

Yasna wrote:

Honestly, mine are filty, and if I am in the bush for weeks, my dreads start to stink if they get wet. I have to use coconut oil, shampoo etc etc and wash each dread out properly.

If I find a good waterfall, or a great storm with lots of rain pouring of roofs top or any catchment system, I will use that time to really give my dreads a good wash.

yes, dreadlocks are dirty. Regular washing is highly recommended ( and just common sense as well)



Also, if I stay in a bush for weeks without washing my hair, I am pretty sure they will be smelly too. But that might be just me?

EDIT: I guess that the bush is not a bush but something similar to Australian countryside
Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Saim » 2020-02-20, 15:03

Lutrinae wrote:
Yasna wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Are dreadlocks dirty?

Simple answer, No.
[...]

Source: https://www.quora.com/Are-dreadlocks-dirty. (Plus, you know, anybody you know with dreadlocks. Which, in your case, is how many people?)


The issue isn't that they are inherently filthy, it's that they require such high maintenance that many people don't manage to keep them clean. Take it from someone with a keen sense of smell who often rides in crowded trains. Or just read the reply directly below the one you quoted.


If people don't manage to keep them clean, the issue is not with the dread-locks, it's with the people.
People who really care about it take care of them, go to the hairdresser or someone they know to turn them (not sure if you say it like this in English?) when hair starts growing, and wash them to keep them clean.
It's totally doable.

Yasna wrote:

Honestly, mine are filty, and if I am in the bush for weeks, my dreads start to stink if they get wet. I have to use coconut oil, shampoo etc etc and wash each dread out properly.

If I find a good waterfall, or a great storm with lots of rain pouring of roofs top or any catchment system, I will use that time to really give my dreads a good wash.

yes, dreadlocks are dirty. Regular washing is highly recommended ( and just common sense as well)



Also, if I stay in a bush for weeks without washing my hair, I am pretty sure they will be smelly too. But that might be just me?

EDIT: I guess that the bush is not a bush but something similar to Australian countryside


Yes, in Australia “the bush” refers to wooded areas. In my home town we had little areas of trees and stuff in between the major suburbs and highways which we would call “bush”. So it’s not exactly countryside, although it can be.


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