True false friends 2

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Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-02-22, 3:52

(en) veneer thin decorative covering
(et) vineer plywood

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-03-02, 17:41

(en) evade/evasion
(fr) s'évader/évasion - escape, break out of

In English, "evade" describes getting away from places or states you aren't in yet, or people who haven't caught you yet. French "s'évader/évasion" is the opposite; it's for getting away from places/states you're already in, or from someone who's caught you.

"Escape" is the closest general translation of "s'évader", but it doesn't specify whether you've been caught; context normally clarifies that.

I noticed the false friendship in this article from Le Figaro.

Le Figaro wrote:Évasion de deux détenus de la prison de Bourges

Two inmates escape Bourges Jail
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-03-29, 19:55

(es) suministro nm - provision, supply
(fr) sous-ministre nmf - deputy minister

I mean, they wouldn't normally be confused, but as someone with only a passive knowledge of Spanish, I could only come up with sous-ministre when I tried to figure out what suministro meant.

Univision wrote:Nueva York tiene una semana de suministros, dice el alcalde, Bill de Blasio.

New York has one week of supplies, says the mayor, Bill de Blasio.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby OldBoring » 2020-03-30, 17:13

What's the difference between vice and deputy in English?

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-03-30, 18:19

OldBoring wrote:What's the difference between vice and deputy in English?

I was really confused for a moment until I realised you meant "vice" as a prefix. ("Deputy" can be used alone as a title, but not "vice". That's one difference.)

I would say the difference it primarily lexical. That is, some titles take "vice" (e.g. "vice president", "vice principal"), some take "deputy" (e.g. "deputy sheriff"), and some take either (e.g. "vice/deputy director", "vice/deputy prime minister") depending on the institution. Arguably, "deputy" retains more the meaning of the original meaning of "person appointed to act on an officeholder's behalf" whereas "vice" simply denotes a rank below, but in practice I would say the choice is arbitrary and historical. Someone who is appointed to fulfill the duties of a vacant position without a formal job search, election, etc. would most commonly be called "interim".

And if that weren't confusing enough, a third element with much the same meaning is "lieutenant", as in "lieutenant colonel" or "lieutenant governor", which respectively denote an office just below that of "colonel", bzw. "governor". All of these titles originated with the idea of having someone ready to fill in if the person a step above (often the highest officeholder in that particular chain of command) was incapacitated.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-03-31, 17:36

(en) clean
(cy) clên

The Welsh is derived from the English but is generally used of people rather than things and with the sense of "decent", "sound" rather than referring to literal cleanliness.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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