True false friends 2

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Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-02, 1:52

linguoboy wrote:(ca) noia girl
(pt-BR) noia drug addict, crazie

(et) nõia witch :mrgreen:

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-05, 22:12

(es-mx) boliche bowling alley
(es-ar) boliche nightclub; small store
(es-es) boliche cup-and-ball toy (balero)
(es-cu) boliche a type of pot roast

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-05, 22:21

Linguaphile wrote:(es-mx) boliche bowling alley
(es-ar) boliche nightclub; small store
(es-es) boliche cup-and-ball toy (balero)
(es-cu) boliche a type of pot roast

(ca) bolig [pronounced /boˈliʧ/] jack ball (for bowls); corn marigold; sweep net
(The first meaning is borrowed from Spanish, the others are ultimately from Greek βολίς.)
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-05, 22:43

(pt-br) educado - mannerly
(en-gb) educated

educado can also have the meaning of "educated", and "educated" actually does have a secondary meaning of "mannerly", but the immediate connotations of both are different. When someone describes someone as mal educado they usually mean that they are rude, not that the have not gone through sufficient schooling, which is what my first thought is.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-06, 1:13

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) educado - mannerly
(en-gb) educated

educado can also have the meaning of "educated", and "educated" actually does have a secondary meaning of "mannerly", but the immediate connotations of both are different. When someone describes someone as mal educado they usually mean that they are rude, not that the have not gone through sufficient schooling, which is what my first thought is.

It's the same with Spanish: educado = polite, well-mannered; maleducado = rude, impolite, ill-mannered

linguoboy wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(es-mx) boliche bowling alley
(es-ar) boliche nightclub; small store
(es-es) boliche cup-and-ball toy (balero)
(es-cu) boliche a type of pot roast

(ca) bolig [pronounced /boˈliʧ/] jack ball (for bowls); corn marigold; sweep net
(The first meaning is borrowed from Spanish, the others are ultimately from Greek βολίς.)

When I came across boliche in Argentine Spanish my first impulse was to think "Why on earth is she asking her husband to pick up some milk from the bowling alley on the way home?" :silly: I mean, I knew that couldn't be right, but I had to look it up.

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Car » 2021-01-07, 10:13

Linguaphile wrote:
Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) educado - mannerly
(en-gb) educated

educado can also have the meaning of "educated", and "educated" actually does have a secondary meaning of "mannerly", but the immediate connotations of both are different. When someone describes someone as mal educado they usually mean that they are rude, not that the have not gone through sufficient schooling, which is what my first thought is.

It's the same with Spanish: educado = polite, well-mannered; maleducado = rude, impolite, ill-mannered

Same in Italian with educato and maleducato respectively as well as French bien/ mal éduqué for well- and ill-mannered respectively.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby OldBoring » 2021-01-07, 10:40

I saw someone in the Milan Expat Facebook group getting angry at an Italian for calling her "maleducata". She was like, how dare this person assume I didn't have an education? :P

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-08, 14:10

(en-gb) to be on the ball - to do well, deal with effectively
(pt-br) pisar na bola (lit. "to step on the ball") - to mess up, screw up
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-08, 15:46

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(en-gb) to be on the ball - to do well, deal with effectively
(pt-br) pisar na bola (lit. "to step on the ball") - to mess up, screw up

The meaning depends very much on the verb used. For example:
(en) to drop the ball - to mess up, mishandle things, miss an opportunity
After having dropped the ball, I suppose you might step on it. :mrgreen:

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-08, 16:09

Linguaphile wrote:The meaning depends very much on the verb used. For example:
(en) to drop the ball - to mess up, mishandle things, miss an opportunity
After having dropped the ball, I suppose you might step on it. :mrgreen:


True, but confusingly enough, having stepped on the ball, you would now be on it! :D
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-01-08, 21:38

(fr) adjectif attribut - predicative adjective
(en) attributive adjective

An attributive adjective is one that is part of a noun phrase, as in "ripe fruit". Meanwhile, French adjectif attribut means "predicative adjective", an adjective as the complement in a copular clause, such as "The fruit is ripe". The French term for an attributive adjective is adjectif épithète.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-19, 1:00

(cy) siopwr

I was thrown to learn that this means not only "shopper" but also "shopkeeper".
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-01-25, 6:41

For whatever reason (probably because they are both used to describe people), I've mixed up these two several times lately.

(es) cabal honest, upright, level-headed, sensible
(et) kaval sly, cunning, deceitful, clever

(es) cabal has other meanings too, but it's the usage that involves describing people that has tripped me up. It kind of changes the impression you get of the person being described, if they are (es) cabal or they are (et) kaval . :mrgreen:

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-26, 15:04

(pt-br) asseverar - to assert, guarantee, assure
(en-gb) to sever - cortar, romper, separar
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-01-28, 17:20

(pt-br) meio-termo - middle-way, compromise
(en-gb) medium-term - médio prazo
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-13, 18:53

(en) martinet disciplinarian
(fr) martinet swift [a type of small songbird]
(ca) martinet heron [a type of large wading bird]
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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