True false friends 2

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-10-14, 15:47

(es) metal brass [in a musical context]
(en) metal

I'm currently editing an article translated rather too literally from the Spanish and I was confused by the line "participating only with metals and keyboards" until I realised the original was "participando solo con metales y teclados".
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-18, 17:11

(en) indoctrinated taught to accept a set of beliefs without questioning them; brainwashed
(es) indoctrinado uneducated, lacking education, ignorant ("indoctrinated" is adoctrinado)

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-10-22, 21:00

(ca) xocolatina chocolate bar; bonbon
(fr) chocolatine pain au chocolat
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-23, 0:08

linguoboy wrote:(ca) xocolatina chocolate bar; bonbon
(fr) chocolatine pain au chocolat

(es) chocolatina chocolate bar (=tableta de chocolate)
(es-ar) chocolatín chocolate bar (=tableta de chocolate)
(es-mx) chocolatín pain au chocolat (=napolitana de chocolate)

And then there are Chocolatines made by Gamesa (Mexican cookie company), which are basically a marshmallow ball on a chocolate wafer, dipped in chocolate and covered with peanuts.

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-23, 4:44

(en) experiment
(es) experimentado experienced, seasoned
(es) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to experience, to undergo, to feel
(pt) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to try, to attempt

(en) practically
(es) prácticamente (1) practically; (2) through practice

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-27, 4:47

(en) Pope
(es) pope Eastern Orthodox priest

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby OldBoring » 2020-10-27, 14:17

Linguaphile wrote:(en) experiment
(es) experimentado experienced, seasoned
(es) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to experience, to undergo, to feel
(pt) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to try, to attempt

What surprised me is that in Portuguese experimentar can also be used to mean "to taste, to try food or beverages".
I am confused by the last two, cause the meanings are not too different, but when thinking better I'd say that Italian sperimentare is like Spanish.

(en) practically
(es) prácticamente (1) practically; (2) through practice
(it) practicamente basically

(ca) xocolatina chocolate bar; bonbon
(fr) chocolatine pain au chocolat
(es) chocolatina chocolate bar (=tableta de chocolate)
(es-ar) chocolatín chocolate bar (=tableta de chocolate)
(es-mx) chocolatín pain au chocolat (=napolitana de chocolate)

And then there are Chocolatines made by Gamesa (Mexican cookie company), which are basically a marshmallow ball on a chocolate wafer, dipped in chocolate and covered with peanuts.

(it) cioccolatino chocolate bonbon
Pain au chocolat is fagottino in Italian.

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-10-27, 15:27

OldBoring wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(en) experiment
(es) experimentado experienced, seasoned
(es) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to experience, to undergo, to feel
(pt) experimentar (1) to experiment, to try out; (2) to try, to attempt

What surprised me is that in Portuguese experimentar can also be used to mean "to taste, to try food or beverages".
I am confused by the last two, cause the meanings are not too different, but when thinking better I'd say that Italian sperimentare is like Spanish.

French is like Spanish in this case, and I can say the "experience" meaning for expérimenter takes getting used to for an English speaker. We express "experience" with, well, "experience". "Experiment" is treated as an unconnected verb with its own semantic space.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-11-11, 18:28

(fr) gosses kids
(fr-QC) gosses bollocks
(fr-frc) gosses husks, shells
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-12, 4:08

(en) permanence state of remaining unchanged indefinitely; everlasting quality
(es) permanencia (1) state of remaining unchanged indefinitely; everlasting quality; (2) stay; visit; sojourn (3) term; tenure; duration i.e. de corta permanencia = short-term, short-lived

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby oho » 2020-11-13, 7:11

OldBoring wrote:
(en) practically
(es) prácticamente (1) practically; (2) through practice
(it) practicamente basically
Watch where the branches of the willows bend
See where the waters of the rivers tend
Graves in the rock, cradles in the sand
Every land is the holy land

Here was the battle to the bitter end
Here's where the enemy killed the friend
Blood on the rock, tears on the sand
Every land is the holy land

Willow by the water bending in the wind
Bent till it's broken and it will not stand
Listen to the word the messengers send
Life like the broken rock, death like the sand
Every land is the holy land

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-11-14, 18:50

(en) avuncular
(de) onkelhaft

This one is interesting to me because it's a difference of connotation rather than denotation (doubtless stemming from different cultural stereotypes around the behaviour of uncles). Duden labels onkelhaft as "meist abwertend" ("usually pejorative") and says, yes, it means "kindly" but also "gönnerhaft [und herablassend]" ("patronising [and condescending]").

This makes me wonder if the meaning of English "avuncular" might vary according to dialect.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-16, 20:53

(et) avarii crash, accident
(es) avería breakdown, failure

I know I've posted this one before in a different thread but it got me again: hearing about someone who had frequent "averías" on a long trip and my immediate thought was that they had gotten into a lot of car accidents (!), when actually the car kept breaking down. Neither is a good situation but having frequent breakdowns on a long trip with an old car is a lot more understandable than having a lot of car accidents along the way. :mrgreen:

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-11-17, 19:13

This one is really embarrassing. Today I was doing some authority work on Welsh musicians and I was puzzled by the fact that a brass band from Anglesey was referred to as both "Seindorf Beaumaris Band" and just "Beaumaris Band". Beaumaris is the name of the town where it is based and Seindorf, well, I assumed it was a personal name like "Waldorf" and that, at some point in the past, there must have been a rich benefactor of German or German-Jewish origin who endowed the band.

Turns out, "seindorf" is just an older term for "band", a native compound formed from sain "sound" and torf "crowd" (cognate with Latin turba) which shows up in the proper names of other longstanding musical groups in Wales.
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-11-23, 6:31

It was mentioned last year that "notorious" has negative connotations in English while its Romance cognates are neutral/positive. I happened upon another set of this kind of false friend:

(en) egregious - especially bad; conspicuous
(it)/(es) egregio - distingished, illustrious
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby OldBoring » 2020-11-24, 16:42

I may consider myself lucky for having never written "Egregious Sir" (egregio signore in Italian) in my life... :para:


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