Random language thread 6

This is our main forum. Here, anything related to languages and linguistics can be discussed.

Moderator: Forum Administrators

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23687
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2019-12-20, 22:59

Synalepha wrote:So is it possible to know whether they just merged by sheer phonological similarity or whether it was also a semantic thing? Metaphorically, each season could be seen as a different "station" of the year.

I don't think phonetic similarity had ought to do with it. In Catalan, saó and estació don't sound much alike at all. (In many dialects, in fact, saó is misconstrued as *saor, leading to derivatives like saoreta instead of expected/standard saoneta.)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Ser
Posts: 7628
Joined: 2008-08-14, 2:55
Real Name: Renato
Gender: male
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Ser » 2019-12-21, 22:09

Yeah, I think this is just an extension (among many others) of statiōnem borrowed one way or another, relegating the inherited satiōnem (Portuguese sazão, Catalan saó) to the background or non-use. It is pretty interesting that in Latin the two words have a similar sound though (you only need to remove a -t- from statiōnem). Dunno if that's relevant.

Also, whoa, I didn't know Catalan completely deleted the initial consonant of -tiōnem in inherited words: ratiōnem also becomes raó.

Romanian nowadays uses sezon, the form of borrowed French saison. In the past, the word in common use was anotimp, lit. year-time, a surprising un-Romanian-like straightforward compound that apparently calques German Jahreszeit (Jahr[-es] 'year' + Zeit 'time'). All the more surprising because the surrounding Slavic languages prefer to render "year" as the adjective "yearly, annual": Czech roční období, Serbian godišnje doba, both "yearly time". Russian uses a genitive: время года "time of-year".

User avatar
Antea
Posts: 3435
Joined: 2015-08-23, 10:53
Real Name: c
Gender: female

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Antea » 2019-12-22, 10:45

Please, where is the Turkish word-association game? I am looking for it like for half an hour in the Turkish sub forum and because it’s all in Turkish I cannot find it :cry:

User avatar
voron
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 4901
Joined: 2007-07-15, 3:29
Real Name: Igor
Gender: male
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby voron » 2019-12-22, 12:37

Antea wrote:Please, where is the Turkish word-association game? I am looking for it like for half an hour in the Turkish sub forum and because it’s all in Turkish I cannot find it :cry:

Here:
https://forum.unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=62&t=51902

User avatar
Antea
Posts: 3435
Joined: 2015-08-23, 10:53
Real Name: c
Gender: female

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Antea » 2019-12-22, 12:45

voron wrote:
Antea wrote:Please, where is the Turkish word-association game? I am looking for it like for half an hour in the Turkish sub forum and because it’s all in Turkish I cannot find it :cry:

Here:
https://forum.unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=62&t=51902


Thanks! Teşekkürler! :D
Last edited by Antea on 2019-12-23, 19:04, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
voron
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 4901
Joined: 2007-07-15, 3:29
Real Name: Igor
Gender: male
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby voron » 2019-12-22, 14:02

Antea wrote:Thanks! Teşekkür! :D

Rica ederim.

It's either teşekkürler or teşekkür ederim, cannot be just teşekkür.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23687
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2019-12-23, 15:35

I'm not used to reading all this Welsh and it's messing up my brain. I messaged an Ecuadorean friend last night to tell him I wanted to see him and came very close to typing "Me gustaría ti weld", an inexplicable munging of "Me gustaría verte" and "Fe fyddai'n dda gyda fi dy weld di".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Ciarán12

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Ciarán12 » 2019-12-27, 20:28

My pronunciation of the word "Portuguese" seems to have changed. My brother noticed it before I did and pointed it out, I'm now saying it with the stress on the first syllable whereas he says it with secondary stress on the first syllable and primary stress on the final syllable (which, upon reflection, is how I used to say it too). This new pronunciation is not coming from Portuguese itself, as I stress "Português" on the final syllable, but more likely from how my wife and other Brazilians tend to pronounce "Portuguese" in English.

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8854
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Osias » 2019-12-27, 22:56

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23687
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2019-12-28, 1:46

I took a Lyft yesterday with a driver named “Baker”. One look at him and I knew it was a pseudonym. We chatted and I waited for him to ask where I was from before I asked him. When he said “Jordan”, I replied, “So ‘Baker’ is a translation or you name? Is your real name Khabbāz?” He was surprised. His next question surprised me. He asked, “Are you Jewish?” (I think he meant “Israeli”.)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Antea
Posts: 3435
Joined: 2015-08-23, 10:53
Real Name: c
Gender: female

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Antea » 2019-12-28, 9:29

linguoboy wrote:I took a Lyft yesterday with a driver named “Baker”. One look at him and I knew it was a pseudonym. We chatted and I waited for him to ask where I was from before I asked him. When he said “Jordan”, I replied, “So ‘Baker’ is a translation or you name? Is your real name Khabbāz?” He was surprised. His next question surprised me. He asked, “Are you Jewish?” (I think he meant “Israeli”.)


It could also come from the Arabic surname بكر , or from the name أبو بكر. There’s also a Hebrew version of the name בכור.

User avatar
md0
Posts: 7650
Joined: 2010-08-08, 19:56
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby md0 » 2019-12-30, 7:15

Random language complaint thread:

There's an advert playing for a long time on radio in Cyprus that says something like "the joyous spark in the eyes of those around us" (it's selling eyeglasses). The problem is, the voice actor adds an extra /n/ by mistake, and as a result I can't stop hearing "the joyous spark in the eyes of our döner".

What he says: i xarmósini spítha sta mátja ton jíron mas
What he should have said: i xarmósini spítha sta mátja ton jíro mas
"If you like your clause structure, you can keep your clause structure"
Stable: Cypriot Greek (el-cy)Standard Modern Greek (el)English (en) Current: Netherlands Dutch (nl)Standard German (de)
Legacy: France French (fr)Japanese (ja)Standard Turkish (tr)Elementary Finnish (fi)

User avatar
Synalepha
Posts: 227
Joined: 2019-11-30, 18:17
Real Name: Riccardo

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Synalepha » 2019-12-30, 17:00

I'm not a prescriptivist but I think it's a pity some grammatical features of Italian are almost dead, such as:

1) inclusive / generic "we" (noi) vs exclusive "we" (noialtri)

2) codesto/a: a demonstrative pronoun or adjective used when something is far from the speaker and near to the person who's spoken to.

3) costì / costà: two adverbs used when the place is far from the speaker and near to the one who's spoken to. Basically they mean "there" for the speaker and "here" for the one spoken to.

4) colui / colei / coloro; costui / costei / costoro - I know it's not grammatical in English but the best way I can translate those is "that/this he", "that/this she", "those/these they" or even "the abovementioned he/she/they".

P.S: 2) and 3) are very Tuscan but even over here, they'll probably die out with my parents' generation.
IG: canis_quercus

User avatar
Synalepha
Posts: 227
Joined: 2019-11-30, 18:17
Real Name: Riccardo

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-06, 20:49

What's the status of Javanese in Indonesia nowadays? Is it a literary language, or is there a diglossic situation where Javanese in the spoken language and Indonesian the literary language and the language of the media at large?
IG: canis_quercus

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23687
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-07, 16:06

In the Hong Kong classic New Dragon Gate Inn (新龍門客棧), travellers are murdered and their flesh made into the filling for meat buns. When guests ask what kind of meat is in the buns, they are told "spicy meat". I never caught what the name was in Cantonese so today on a whim I looked it up and found out it's "十香肉", literally "ten fragrance meat". So not "spicy" as in "spicy hot" but "spicy" as in "well-spiced".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23687
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-07, 19:14

In other news, here's a nasty pair of heteronyms I just came across:

underage /ˌʌndəɹˈeɪdʒ/ below the legal age for an activity
underage /ˈʌndəɹɪdʒ/ shortfall, deficit

I'm familiar with both words and I've never confused them (since the latter only occurs in specialised financial contexts), but this has got to make L2 speakers' heads hurt.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Luís
Forum Administrator
Posts: 7814
Joined: 2002-07-12, 22:44
Location: Lisboa
Country: PT Portugal (Portugal)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Luís » 2020-01-11, 14:18

Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

User avatar
Vlürch
Posts: 891
Joined: 2014-05-06, 8:42
Gender: male
Location: Roihuvuori, Helsinki
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Vlürch » 2020-01-13, 4:42

I just mistook 性格 (seikaku; "personality") for 性欲 (seiyoku; "sexual desire") and was confused because the context was about people born on a certain date, which... well, you know, doesn't really make sense... not that any kind of predictions based on birthdays and stuff really make sense, but ones about sexuality make even less sense than ones about overall personality or whatever. I had to copypaste it and check on Wiktionary to realise my mistake, and the kanji aren't even similar... :oops:

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8854
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Osias » 2020-01-13, 16:58

I think they do, if mirror flipped.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Synalepha
Posts: 227
Joined: 2019-11-30, 18:17
Real Name: Riccardo

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-23, 11:26

I've recently gone back to watching some videos from the YT polyglot community (after many years of voluntary abstinence) and some of them such as Luca Lampariello and Lýdia Machová have morphed into self-defined "language coaches/mentors" that is someone who is supposed to teach you how to learn languages.

Do you have any opinion about this concept? Or has anyone tried them out?

My cynical self is always skeptic of people who want to tell you how to do things (of course there are exceptions) but maybe they can be helpful?
IG: canis_quercus


Return to “General Language Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest