Random language thread 6

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Osias » 2019-09-23, 18:07

Gente boa, ele.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Luís » 2019-09-23, 19:24

Apparently in Canada "hydro" refers to an electricity supplier (because hydroelectric plants are popular?)

When I was in Ottawa a while back I remember being puzzled after seeing a couple of guys from the Hydro Ottawa company on top of a ladder working on a utility pole. I thought to myself "why are the guys from the water company doing that kind of work?" :lol:
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Dormouse559 » 2019-09-24, 2:46

Luís wrote:Apparently in Canada "hydro" refers to an electricity supplier (because hydroelectric plants are popular?)

I'd say it's normal to refer to hydroelectric power as "hydro" in the U.S. as well, especially when the context of electricity generation has already been established.

EDIT: Ah, I didn't know about the broader meaning you meant. I haven't encountered that one in the states.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-09-24, 7:43

OldBoring wrote:Probably either by car or by The El

I don't think the "the" is usually capitalized, but I'm not sure.
linguoboy wrote:I replied "Die spinnen, die Amis", which is a play on the German version of Asterix' "Ils sont fous, ces Romains!" You could translate it as, "They're crazy, these Yankees".

(You may have already known this, but) at least British English versions of Asterix translate this as "these Romans are crazy!"
Vlürch wrote:
linguoboy wrote:I had my first comment reported for "violation of community standards" on Facebook. A friend posted a picture of himself in Munich eating “New York Style Cheeseburgers" which he described as "open face on a half a garlic baguette that must be eaten with fork and knife like we do all the time in NYC". I replied "Die spinnen, die Amis", which is a play on the German version of Asterix' "Ils sont fous, ces Romains!" You could translate it as, "They're crazy, these Yankees". So even if you missed the underlying joke completely, it's really the mildest form of disparagement imaginable.

Could it be that it was misinterpreted as being a death threat or something in English? It's a short enough sentence that maybe the die was all that was picked up by some algorithm

"Die Bart, Die"
Massimiliano B wrote:In A description of Abun: a West Papuan language of Irian Jaya, I have found the following sentence (page 68):

Fredik bari-wa git yetu, and the meaning is... "Fredik does not want to eat people" :shock: :o

New Guinea in general was so well known for cannibalism in the previous century that you would be hard-pressed to find any other information on that part of the world back then.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Massimiliano B » 2019-09-24, 10:39

vijayjohn wrote:
Massimiliano B wrote:In A description of Abun: a West Papuan language of Irian Jaya, I have found the following sentence (page 68):

Fredik bari-wa git yetu, and the meaning is... "Fredik does not want to eat people" :shock: :o

New Guinea in general was so well known for cannibalism in the previous century that you would be hard-pressed to find any other information on that part of the world back then.


I know, but it is funny to find such sentence in a scientific description of a language.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby aaakknu » 2019-09-24, 17:58

Здайся на Господа у твоїх справах, і задуми твої здійсняться. (Приповідки 16, 3)
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2019-09-24, 18:17

So this is kind of perverse: The chữ Nôm spelling of rét "very cold", is derived from the Hanzi 烈 (which contains the fire radical () and means "fiery" or "ardent") with the addition of the ice radical (冫).
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Osias » 2019-09-24, 21:07

Reminds of 'aguardente'.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Saim » 2019-09-25, 11:26

I just uploaded my MA thesis into my unversity's thesis archives, and I got some pretty baffling options for what language the thesis is written in, including:

Arabic (Tunisian dialect)
Indo-European
Malayan
sgr
Srpski
Syrian

I guess Malayan is just a translation error for the English version of the site (I couldn't even figure out where I could switch it to Polish), but I don't know how the rest could have happened. I also assume sgr is meant to stand for starogrecki (Ancient Geek) and not Sangisari.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby voron » 2019-09-25, 11:53

Saim wrote:I just uploaded my MA thesis into my unversity's thesis archives

And what is Syrian? Syrian dialect of Arabic? Or Syriac?

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Saim » 2019-09-25, 12:18

voron wrote:
Saim wrote:I just uploaded my MA thesis into my unversity's thesis archives

And what is Syrian? Syrian dialect of Arabic? Or Syriac?


I just checked and the most common Polish term for Syriac seems to be język syryjski, so it must just be another bad translation. Syryjski also means Syrian in Polish.

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C4%99zyk_syryjski

^ One of the references there is Wprowadzenie do języka syryjskiego.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby księżycowy » 2019-09-25, 18:27

Ancient Geek? :P

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-09-26, 4:40

Yes, of course, all MA theses are written in Ancient Geek. ;)
Massimiliano B wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Massimiliano B wrote:In A description of Abun: a West Papuan language of Irian Jaya, I have found the following sentence (page 68):

Fredik bari-wa git yetu, and the meaning is... "Fredik does not want to eat people" :shock: :o

New Guinea in general was so well known for cannibalism in the previous century that you would be hard-pressed to find any other information on that part of the world back then.


I know, but it is funny to find such sentence in a scientific description of a language.

Then you haven't read enough linguistics papers! Linguists love using gory and violent example sentences.

I saw a couple of people circulating the picture of him with the sign on Twitter. I didn't know his language was Udmurt, though.
linguoboy wrote:So this is kind of perverse: The chữ Nôm spelling of rét "very cold", is derived from the Hanzi 烈 (which contains the fire radical () and means "fiery" or "ardent") with the addition of the ice radical (冫).

Why is that kind of perverse? AFAICT that's just how people in tropical climates perceive ice: something that's as cold as fire is hot. The concept of cold temperatures is difficult to fathom in such places.
Saim wrote:I just uploaded my MA thesis into my unversity's thesis archives

It's in Polish, though, right?

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-09-26, 5:09

vijayjohn wrote:
linguoboy wrote:So this is kind of perverse: The chữ Nôm spelling of rét "very cold", is derived from the Hanzi 烈 (which contains the fire radical () and means "fiery" or "ardent") with the addition of the ice radical (冫).

Why is that kind of perverse? AFAICT that's just how people in tropical climates perceive ice: something that's as cold as fire is hot. The concept of cold temperatures is difficult to fathom in such places.

Not limited to tropical climates. There's also these cognates from Finnic and Saamic:

(liv) pallõ to burn
(vot) pallõttaa to freeze
(krl) palella to freeze completely, to burn completely
(fi) paleltaa to be freezing, to feel cold
(fi) polttaa to burn
(et) põletama to burn
(smi-sme) buollát to catch fire, ignite
(smi-sme) buolaš frost, frosty weather

Here I don't think it's a matter of the concepts being "difficult to fathom;" Finnic- and Saamic-speaking areas have always had both extreme cold (winter weather) and extreme heat (fire). But extreme heat and extreme cold can feel so similar that if you unexpectedly touch something that is cold enough, your brain will initially perceive it as burning hot. Even in English, we have the expression "freezer burn". Perhaps it's not what the Vietnamese had in mind with rét, but at extremes hot and cold are more similar than you'd think.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Saim » 2019-09-26, 6:59

vijayjohn wrote:It's in Polish, though, right?


No, it’s in English. I just had to translate the title and abstract. I relied heavily on Hungarian- and Ukrainian-language sources, though, and mostly gave citations in the original language alongside my translation.

The only class I took in Polish over the two years was my one elective. I would’ve loved to study in Polish but this was the only degree that interested me.
Last edited by Saim on 2019-10-06, 18:27, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Naava » 2019-09-26, 7:16

Linguaphile wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
linguoboy wrote:So this is kind of perverse: The chữ Nôm spelling of rét "very cold", is derived from the Hanzi 烈 (which contains the fire radical () and means "fiery" or "ardent") with the addition of the ice radical (冫).

Why is that kind of perverse? AFAICT that's just how people in tropical climates perceive ice: something that's as cold as fire is hot. The concept of cold temperatures is difficult to fathom in such places.

Not limited to tropical climates. There's also these cognates from Finnic and Saamic:

You can also describe something that is extremely cold (objects, weather, season...) as (fi) polttavan kylmä, 'burning cold'. Like Linguaphile said, when something is cold enough, it does feel like it was burning you. I think I've read somewhere that extreme coldness causes the same nerves to react as extreme heat, but I'm not sure. It was long ago. :)

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby md0 » 2019-09-28, 18:19

I was going to start a new thread about reading numbers but maybe it's not worth it yet. In any case, I'm curious how you deal with reading the numbers after a decimal point in other languages and contexts, and what are the standard ways to do it where consistency is needed.

So, currency amounts seems to be straightforward: twenty UNIT fifty-five SUBUNIT, twenty and fifty-five, twenty fifty-five. It would be the same in Greek and every other language I'm familiar with.

I've noticed some variation with units of measurement (sometimes they will be read number by number but it's still common to read them as we read currency amounts). Unit-less numbers though seem to be almost always read number by number.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Osias » 2019-10-04, 18:40

I used to criticize the 'Shazam' app for only identifying songs recorded by record labels and not the ones we sing, which is the feature that most interested me. But yesterday I discovered it can be useful for showing the lyrics of said songs.

Not many songs in the languages we are learning have lyric videos on youtube and Shazam worked for all I've tried until now, showing the the lyrics line by line, following the point where the song is (in opposition to we having to detect with our eyes what line the song is playing now, a hard task when we are learning the language) and even with the kanji in case of Japanese instead of a romaji transcription. (Didn't work for Korean alphabet, though.)

Also, it works for songs playing in other devices, like a tv, a radio, or even a (entirely offline) toy I gave to my nephew yesterday. Turns out it was playing a Romanian song.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-10-06, 4:12

md0 wrote:I was going to start a new thread about reading numbers but maybe it's not worth it yet. In any case, I'm curious how you deal with reading the numbers after a decimal point in other languages and contexts, and what are the standard ways to do it where consistency is needed.

Here, we were taught that the general rule is to say "dot" and then just read out the digits after the decimal point (e.g. 12.05 would be 'twelve dot oh five' or, probably less often, 'twelve dot zero five'), or else to convert the part after the decimal point to fractions over ten/a hundred/whatever the lowest possible denominator was (e.g. 'twelve and five-hundredths', 12.50 -> 'twelve and a half') even though no one does this (except for 0.5). Malayalam also seems to do the 'twelve dot zero five' thing ('dot/decimal point' in Malayalam, as I discovered after posting a video elsewhere on this forum, is [d̪əˈɕaːmɕəm]).
So, currency amounts seems to be straightforward: twenty UNIT fifty-five SUBUNIT, twenty and fifty-five, twenty fifty-five. It would be the same in Greek and every other language I'm familiar with.

Yes, except that people convert subunits sometimes, e.g. $4.25 can be 'four dollars and a quarter' (as well as 'four dollars and twenty-five cents') since a quarter is twenty-five cents (at least in the US...).

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-10-06, 4:26

md0 wrote:I was going to start a new thread about reading numbers but maybe it's not worth it yet. In any case, I'm curious how you deal with reading the numbers after a decimal point in other languages and contexts, and what are the standard ways to do it where consistency is needed.


12.05 =
English: twelve point oh five or twelve point zero five
Spanish: doce punto cero cinco (literally: twelve point zero five) or doce coma cero cinco (twelve comma zero five)
Estonian: kaksteist koma null viis (literally: twelve comma zero five; normally written 12,05)

vijayjohn wrote:people convert subunits sometimes, e.g. $4.25 can be 'four dollars and a quarter' (as well as 'four dollars and twenty-five cents') since a quarter is twenty-five cents (at least in the US...).

Or four and a quarter, without saying the word "dollars".


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