Random language thread 6

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mōdgethanc
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby mōdgethanc » 2018-11-28, 4:16

IpseDixit wrote:Do you consider burgundy a type of red or a color on its own (or a type of another color)?
I would consider it a shade of red, but depending on the exact hue I might see it as more of a purple.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Car » 2018-11-28, 10:35

IpseDixit wrote:Do you consider burgundy a type of red or a color on its own (or a type of another color)?

Some days ago, I had to meet up with a friend of mine who's a native-Portuguese-speaker, and since we had to meet in a very crowded square, I told him I was wearing a red shirt, when he saw me he told me that my shirt was burgundy, not red, and ok, I'm the first one to admit that burgundy is not what I would immediately picture if I thought of the color red (I would actually picture something like scarlet), nonetheless burgundy definitely remains a kind of red for me (and that's what we call it in Italian: rosso bordeaux).

What does burgundy have to do with Bordeaux? Did you get confused there?

Anyway, burgundy is called Burgunderrot (Burgundy red) in German, so it's a kind of red, but I wouldn't expect that either when I'm told you're wearing a red shirt.
Please correct my mistakes!

IpseDixit

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-11-28, 10:54

Car wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Do you consider burgundy a type of red or a color on its own (or a type of another color)?

Some days ago, I had to meet up with a friend of mine who's a native-Portuguese-speaker, and since we had to meet in a very crowded square, I told him I was wearing a red shirt, when he saw me he told me that my shirt was burgundy, not red, and ok, I'm the first one to admit that burgundy is not what I would immediately picture if I thought of the color red (I would actually picture something like scarlet), nonetheless burgundy definitely remains a kind of red for me (and that's what we call it in Italian: rosso bordeaux).

What does burgundy have to do with Bordeaux? Did you get confused there?


Beacuse maroon, claret and burgundy are all normally grouped under the term bordeaux. Of course there are specific words for each of them, but I don't think many people know them.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Car » 2018-11-28, 11:50

IpseDixit wrote:
Car wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Do you consider burgundy a type of red or a color on its own (or a type of another color)?

Some days ago, I had to meet up with a friend of mine who's a native-Portuguese-speaker, and since we had to meet in a very crowded square, I told him I was wearing a red shirt, when he saw me he told me that my shirt was burgundy, not red, and ok, I'm the first one to admit that burgundy is not what I would immediately picture if I thought of the color red (I would actually picture something like scarlet), nonetheless burgundy definitely remains a kind of red for me (and that's what we call it in Italian: rosso bordeaux).

What does burgundy have to do with Bordeaux? Did you get confused there?


Beacuse maroon, claret and burgundy are all normally grouped under the term bordeaux. Of course there are specific words for each of them, but I don't think many people know them.

Ok, I see, although maroon is a type of brown for German-speakers.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Naava » 2018-11-28, 12:17

I would call maroon, claret, and burgundy "dark red" or "wine red" in Finnish.

IpseDixit

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-11-28, 12:30

Naava wrote:I would call maroon, claret, and burgundy "dark red" or "wine red" in Finnish.


They're used in Italian too.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Luís » 2018-12-02, 11:58

I just learned that in Spanish both Amazonia and Amazonía are valid forms (the accentuated form is apparently common in Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela)
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Surgeon » 2018-12-02, 18:25

Are there any resources for Hejazi and Najdi Arabic? Or is Khaliji the only option?

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Yasna » 2018-12-04, 19:00

Just noticed that cuneiform now displays as normal, editable text in Wikipedia articles, without having to choose fonts or anything. What glorious times we live in.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2018-12-05, 16:25

Friend shared a PM which he ended with "Alvitzzane". You know, the way they say "goodbye" in German.
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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Vlürch » 2018-12-05, 17:11

IpseDixit wrote:Do you consider burgundy a type of red or a color on its own (or a type of another color)?

Like Naava, I consider all the different dark reddish hues "dark red" or "wine red". Sometimes just "red" if there's no need to specify, so I wouldn't be all that surprised if someone said "red" and it turned out to be burgundy. Then again, it would be weird if it was specifically dark burgundy because to me that's much closer to purple or even brown if it's not very saturated.

Related: does anyone else feel like pink-orange spectra should be included among the "standard" colour spectra? You know, something like this:
Image
Image
Image

To me, that's like a "spectrum of cute warm colours". If the pink gets too bluish or the orange gets too reddish and fleshy, it doesn't fit on that spectrum at all, even though they all fit together on larger spectra and of course on the spectrum of all colours. I guess my definition of pink may be skewed, though? I mean, to me the colour of cherry blossoms is the "default" pink, like that's what I think of first when I think of "pink" rather than some more saturated and unnatural hue like the left end of the central pic; my gut tells me that's right at the edge of becoming a "cold ugly colour", which I guess is many people's "default" pink?

EDIT: Forgot an important question: does any language consider pink and orange to form a spectrum, or otherwise link them more closely?

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Luís » 2018-12-06, 19:51

I was browsing through one of my Polish books and came across the following sentence in one of the first lessons:

Cześć. Cieszę się, że jesteście. (Hi, I'm glad that you're here)

/t͡ʂɛɕt͡ɕ ˈt͡ɕɛ.ʂɛ ɕɛ̃ ʐɛ jɛˈstɛɕ.t͡ɕɛ/

I quickly remembered why I gave up on it. This language is simply unpronounceable for mere mortals.
(and yes, I'm aware some people think EP sounds like Polish)
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby księżycowy » 2018-12-07, 0:07

Polish certainly has an interesting cadence. But it's hardly unpronounceable. I mean, if I can get Vijay to do it, I can get anyone pronouncing Polish well in a day. :P

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby mōdgethanc » 2018-12-07, 0:18

Luís wrote:I was browsing through one of my Polish books and came across the following sentence in one of the first lessons:

Cześć. Cieszę się, że jesteście. (Hi, I'm glad that you're here)

/t͡ʂɛɕt͡ɕ ˈt͡ɕɛ.ʂɛ ɕɛ̃ ʐɛ jɛˈstɛɕ.t͡ɕɛ/

I quickly remembered why I gave up on it. This language is simply unpronounceable for mere mortals.
(and yes, I'm aware some people think EP sounds like Polish)
I think it sounds more like Russian. The nasal vowels are like Polish, but the dark /l/ (which Polish has shifted to /w/) and vowel reduction are very much like Russian.

Anyway, the really hard part of Slavlangs to me is when they have weird clusters like /vzgl/ that begin a word. English has some tricky clusters as well, but beginning a word with four consonants is just wacky.

IpseDixit

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-07, 0:25

Luís wrote:I was browsing through one of my Polish books and came across the following sentence in one of the first lessons:

Cześć. Cieszę się, że jesteście. (Hi, I'm glad that you're here)

/t͡ʂɛɕt͡ɕ ˈt͡ɕɛ.ʂɛ ɕɛ̃ ʐɛ jɛˈstɛɕ.t͡ɕɛ/

I quickly remembered why I gave up on it. This language is simply unpronounceable for mere mortals.
(and yes, I'm aware some people think EP sounds like Polish)


Putting that sentence in one of the first lessons seems quite an asshole move to be honest. It seems that Poles really need to let other people know that their language is really difficult (apparently). I've seen this countless times on social media or other forums and it really left me wondering what kinds of insecurities they're trying to make up for.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby mōdgethanc » 2018-12-07, 7:21

Might have something to do with their language and culture being targeted for extermination within living memory.

Or maybe they're just rationalizing why nobody else speaks it.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Saim » 2018-12-07, 9:27

Am I the only one who thinks that (European) Portuguese sounds like (Eastern) Catalan? And not like Russian or Polish or whatever?

Luís wrote:Cześć. Cieszę się, że jesteście. (Hi, I'm glad that you're here)

/t͡ʂɛɕt͡ɕ ˈt͡ɕɛ.ʂɛ ɕɛ̃ ɕɛ ʐɛ jɛˈstɛɕ.t͡ɕɛ/


No-one would nasalise this vowel in normal speech.

mōdgethanc wrote:Might have something to do with their language and culture being targeted for extermination within living memory.

Or maybe they're just rationalizing why nobody else speaks it.


I think it has more to do with the latter since I've seen Czechs, Slovaks and Hungarians do this.

mōdgethanc wrote:The nasal vowels are like Polish,


Pronounced in isolation (and in final position for many but not all speakers) <ą> is fairly close to <ão>, and I guess the nasalised dipthong in, say, wiedski is similar to <em>, but in general Polish only really nasalises before fricatives whereas the Portuguese system is much more robust.

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby księżycowy » 2018-12-07, 10:29

Saim wrote:
Luís wrote:Cześć. Cieszę się, że jesteście. (Hi, I'm glad that you're here)

/t͡ʂɛɕt͡ɕ ˈt͡ɕɛ.ʂɛ ɕɛ̃ ɕɛ ʐɛ jɛˈstɛɕ.t͡ɕɛ/


No-one would nasalise this vowel in normal speech.

I thought the same thing, but didn't comment. :P

And what makes it a bit weirder is, the first <ę> is correctly not nasalized. :hmm:

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Car » 2018-12-07, 11:08

księżycowy wrote:Polish certainly has an interesting cadence. But it's hardly unpronounceable. I mean, if I can get Vijay to do it, I can get anyone pronouncing Polish well in a day. :P

Teach us then. :P
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Random language thread 6

Postby Luís » 2018-12-07, 11:29

księżycowy wrote:
Saim wrote:No-one would nasalise this vowel in normal speech.

I thought the same thing, but didn't comment. :P

And what makes it a bit weirder is, the first <ę> is correctly not nasalized. :hmm:


I copy pasted the phonetic transcriptions from Wiktionary, that's why :P

Each word per se is not very hard to pronounce, but that particular sentence looks like a tongue twister to me (think "She sells sea shells by the sea shore")
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