Random language thread 6

This is our main forum. Here, anything related to languages and linguistics can be discussed.

Moderator: Forum Administrators

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 6402
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby dEhiN » 2021-01-07, 4:28

linguoboy wrote:As far as I know, he spoke no Welsh. According to Wikipedia he required "special coaching" to say his lines, but I'm not sure of the source for that.)

I recall several years ago, living in Toronto, I would frequent language exchange Meetups and one of them in particular was always held at the Ontario Conservatory of Music in downtown TO. Anyway, for a brief period one of the regular attendees was a woman training in opera at the OCM and she was trying to improver her German I think in part to help her opera singing. She told us how they had to learn to read IPA to help them sing in other languages better. I also read/heard somewhere (perhaps even on here?) about a past pope from modern times that knew IPA and would learn speeches he was going to say using IPA to help him say a speech in another language.

(On another non-linguistic note, it's amazing to me how TV/movie productions will take whatever steps they need to teach actors specialized skills just for the right part. Apparently several of the cast of The Fast and the Furious series didn't know to drive when they were first signed on, but were taught. This was also true of some cast for the FF one about drifting, and as well, Vin Diesel had never driven stick shift prior to the FF series.)
N: (en-ca) B1: (fr) A1: (pt-br) ((es) (ta-lk)) A0: (sv) (ro)

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 6402
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby dEhiN » 2021-01-11, 12:44

I was looking up Romanian greetings and their etymologies on Wiktionary and I'm curious how the greetings came to be because they don't seem to follow the same pattern. For example, Romanian has bună dimineața for "good morning", bună ziua for "good afternoon / good day", bună seara for "good evening" and noapte bună for "good night". However, if I break them down linguistically, we get:

bună - feminine indefinite singular for "good"
dimineața - definite singular of "morning", feminine gender
ziua - definite singular of "day", feminine gender
seara - definite singular of "evening", feminine gender
noapte - indefinite singular of "night", feminine gender

The matching forms for the above would be:

dimineață - indefinite singular of "morning", feminine gender
zi - indefinite singular of "day", feminine gender
seară - indefinite singular of "evening", feminine gender
buna - feminine definite singular for "good"

So, the only greeting that fits in terms of agreement is noapte bună. For the others, I would either expect:

*bună dimineață
*bună zi
*bună seară

Or:

*buna dimineața
*buna seara
*buna ziua

I'm also not sure why the greeting for "goodnight" has the adjective following the noun, though I know that in both Portuguese and French, some adjectives change their meaning when preceding versus following a noun. I doubt that's the case here, but I can see the fact that noapte is the indefinite singular form affecting things.

Anyway, if anyone else can shed light on how or why the greetings came to be like this, I would love to hear about it.
N: (en-ca) B1: (fr) A1: (pt-br) ((es) (ta-lk)) A0: (sv) (ro)

User avatar
OldBoring
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 6051
Joined: 2012-12-08, 7:19
Real Name: Francesco
Gender: male
Location: Milan
Country: IT Italy (Italia)
Contact:

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby OldBoring » 2021-01-11, 14:50

Shit... you already listed all the Romanian words I know...

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24390
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Random language thread 6

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-11, 17:42

dEhiN wrote:I'm also not sure why the greeting for "goodnight" has the adjective following the noun, though I know that in both Portuguese and French, some adjectives change their meaning when preceding versus following a noun. I doubt that's the case here, but I can see the fact that noapte is the indefinite singular form affecting things.

I can also see it being affected by prosody. Of those last three, only noapte contains a heavy syllable.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


Return to “General Language Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest