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Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-25, 18:38
by Aurinĭa
Continuation of this thread, which can now be found in the Forum Archives.

Post your multilingual false friends here!

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-26, 14:46
by Vlürch
English (en) kitchen
Tatar (tt) кичен/kiçen - in the evening

Turkish (tr) küçük - small
Azeri (az) küçük - puppy
Kurdish (ku) kûçik - dog
Azeri (az) kiçik - small
Crimean Tatar (crh) kiçik - small
Uzbek (uz) kichik - small
Khakas (kjh) кічіг - small
кичиг - small
Southern Altai (alt) кӱчӱк - puppy
Tajik (tg) кучук - dog
Persian (fa) کوچک (kučak) - small
Balochi (bal) کچک (kucak) - dog

Macedonian (mk) кучка - female dog
Bulgarian (bg) кучка - bitch
Serbo-Croatian (sh) кучка/kučka - female dog

Finnish (fi) hoi - hey, ahoy (sailor greeting)
Rapa Nui (rap) hoi - horse
hoi - deep sea; go in; put in
Andi (ani) хой - dog
Khakas (kjh) хой - sheep
Tuvan (tyv) хой - sheep

Kyrgyz (ky) кой - sheep
Kazakh (kk) қой - sheep
Uyghur (ug) قوي/қой - sheep
Crimean Tatar (crh) къой/qoy - sheep
Turkish (tr) koy - cove; put, fuck (imperative)
Erzya (myv) кой - law, tradition, custom
Finnish (fi) koi - cloth moth; Japanese carp
Estonian (et) koi - cloth moth
Karelian (krl) koi - moth
koi - moth
Japanese (ja) (koi) - carp
English (en) koi - Japanese carp
Bulgarian (bg) кой - who, which, what
Palauan (pau) koi - grey
Maori (mi) koi - spike; sharp
koy - slave
koy - horse

Finnish (fi) kukka - flower
kukka - flower
Chuvash (cv) кукка - maternal uncle
Faroese (fo) kukka - (childish) to defecate
Italian (it) cucca - he/she/it obtains by deceit, deceives
Neapolitan (nap) cuccà - to lay (someone or something) down; to lie down
Sicilian (scn) cucca - female cuckoo; little owl; bad luck-bringer person, jinx

English (en) kin
Turkish (tr) kin - hatred
Azeri (az) kin - hatred
Crimean Tatar (crh) кин/kin - hatred
Karaim (kdr) кин - day; hatred
Chuvash (cv) кин - daughter-in-law
Udmurt (udm) кин - who
Hungarian (hu) kin - on whom
Japanese (ja) (kin) - gold
Kurdish (ku) kin - short
Dutch (nl) kin - chin
Afrikaans (af) kin - chin
West Frisian (fy) kin - chin

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:11
by linguoboy
(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:18
by IpseDixit
linguoboy wrote:(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]


ת is pronounced [s] in Yiddish? :o

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:22
by vijayjohn
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]


ת is pronounced [s] in Yiddish? :o

Yep, and not just in Yiddish either:
In traditional Ashkenazi pronunciation, tav represents an /s/ without the dagesh and has the plosive form when it has the dagesh.

(From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taw)

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:24
by linguoboy
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]


ת is pronounced [s] in Yiddish? :o

Generally, yes. Historically it lenited to [θ] in Hebrew. In areas where the dominate vernacular had /θ/ (e.g. Greece, Iraq, Yemen), it was maintained as such. Otherwise it fell together with /s/ (Ashkenazic), /d/ (Spain, Portugal), or /t/ (other Sephardic communities).

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:29
by IpseDixit
And is it of Germanic or Semitic origin? Modern Israeli Hebrew has that word too, only it's pronounced [ta'xat].

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 18:33
by vijayjohn
Semitic.

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 19:03
by linguoboy
IpseDixit wrote:And is it of Germanic or Semitic origin? Modern Israeli Hebrew has that word too, only it's pronounced [ta'xat].

You can tell from the spelling: ת is only ever used in Yiddish words of Semitic origin. The normal way to write /s/ is ס and /t/ is ט. Similarly with ח, since the usual way to write /x/ in Yiddish is with כ. (Using כ for /k/ is another sure sign of a Semitic loan since /k/ in words of European origin is written ק.)

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-30, 19:30
by IpseDixit
Interesting to know.

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-31, 3:14
by vijayjohn
American English (en-US) potty - toilet (especially for children)
Tamil (ta) போட்டி [ˈpoːʈi] - competition

Malayalam doesn't have a cognate with this Tamil word, so when I first saw it written in a Tamil cartoon, I had no idea what it meant, and it always reminded me of the American English word. :P

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-01-31, 14:00
by atalarikt
Japanese (ja) 黒 (kuro) black
True Motu kurokuro white

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-04, 20:21
by vijayjohn
Tagalog (tl) bawal (apparently pronounced [ˈbaʔwal]) - forbidden
Amharic (am) በኋላ bähwala - after

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-09, 13:37
by atalarikt
Low German (nds) buuk belly
Sundanese (su) buuk [bʊʔʊk] hair

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-12, 7:25
by cHr0mChIk
In the old thread, I've mentioned this example:

cHr0mChIk wrote:Polish (pl) "szukam drogi na zachód" - I am looking for the road on the west
Czech (cs) "šukam drogy na záchod" - I am f**king drugs in the toilet


Today, I've stumbled upon an another similar, bizarre one. However, this time, it's the other way around. The sentence sounds normal in Czech/Slovak, but... hmm... highly inappropriate in Polish:

Czech (cs) "Tam byla porucha v odbytu" - There was a malfunction in sales
Slovak (sk) "Tam bola porucha v odbyte" - There was a malfunction in sales
Polish (pl) "Tam była "porucha" w odbycie" - There was sex in the anus

"Porucha" - means "malfunction/failure/disturbance" in Czech/Slovak - and it comes from the verb rušit' (to disturb) - *rušiti in Proto-Slavic (Russian рушить - to tear down; Serbo-Croatian rušiti - to demolish/crush; Polish ruszyć - to stir/touch/move etc.). However, in Polish, the verb (po)ruchać means "to f**k". The Polish word might share the root and etymology, however, a semantic shift appears to have taken place here, which resulted what it means in modern Polish.

"Odbyt" means "sales" in CZ/SK, and "anus" in Polish. I've tried to research these, however I didn't find anything in the books I have and in the ones which are available to me. Perhaps someone else has an idea of the etymology of these words. Also, I might attempt a more in depth research in the future, about the etymology of Czech "odbyt" vs. the Polish "odbyt".

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-12, 19:06
by Vlürch
English (en) mast
Persian (fa) مست (mast) - drunk

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-13, 3:40
by vijayjohn
مست is actually where the English word must(h) comes from.

I am so tempted to buffalax this famous 90s Bollywood song now, though. :P "Do cheese a buddy, hey, mustard, mustard! Do cheese a buddy, hay must!" (Anybody who's heard that song enough times probably knows which song I'm talking about even without clicking on the hyperlink).

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-13, 3:46
by הענט
linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]


ת is pronounced [s] in Yiddish? :o

Generally, yes. Historically it lenited to [θ] in Hebrew. In areas where the dominate vernacular had /θ/ (e.g. Greece, Iraq, Yemen), it was maintained as such. Otherwise it fell together with /s/ (Ashkenazic), /d/ (Spain, Portugal), or /t/ (other Sephardic communities).


Is תּחת relative to the English word tush?

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-13, 3:54
by vijayjohn
Hent wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(yi) תּחת /toxəs/ buttocks
(ga) tochas /toxəs/ scratching [to relieve an itch]


ת is pronounced [s] in Yiddish? :o

Generally, yes. Historically it lenited to [θ] in Hebrew. In areas where the dominate vernacular had /θ/ (e.g. Greece, Iraq, Yemen), it was maintained as such. Otherwise it fell together with /s/ (Ashkenazic), /d/ (Spain, Portugal), or /t/ (other Sephardic communities).


Is תּחת relative to the English word tush?

Yep, apparently, that's where it comes from. Tush is (or at least was) short for toches.

Re: Multilingual false friends 2

Posted: 2018-02-13, 5:44
by cHr0mChIk
Vlürch wrote:English (en) mast
Persian (fa) مست (mast) - drunk


Serbian (sr) маст (mast) - lard/fat