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Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 3:58
by vijayjohn
I think razlem pretty much hit the nail on the head. I think this is also the first time I have said that about anyone.

And oops, I just noticed this:
mōdgethanc wrote:Aixquirôzu!

What's "aixquirôzu"?

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 4:11
by mōdgethanc
vijayjohn wrote:What's "aixquirôzu"?
It's supposed to be asqueroso in a caricature of Brazilian Portuguese.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 6:57
by vijayjohn
You just taught me a new word. :shock:

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 9:14
by Naava
Vlürch wrote:-- to get some clarity on whether everyone I know has just some weird speech imediment that's infected me as well

That's called "stadin slangi".

I had to. I just had to. I don't know if I'm sorry.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 15:14
by Serafín
I like asco and asqueroso. They're worse than "disgust/disgusting", yet they're not quite "nausea/nauseating".

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-17, 15:41
by dEhiN
Serafín wrote:I like asco and asqueroso. They're worse than "disgust/disgusting", yet they're not quite "nausea/nauseating".

So what would be more equivalent to "disgust/disgusting"?

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-18, 0:46
by vijayjohn
Serafín wrote:I like asco and asqueroso.

I knew asco but not asqueroso.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-18, 1:42
by Serafín
dEhiN wrote:
Serafín wrote:I like asco and asqueroso. They're worse than "disgust/disgusting", yet they're not quite "nausea/nauseating".

So what would be more equivalent to "disgust/disgusting"?

Hmm, actually, the more I've been thinking about it, the more I think I'm wrong, and these pairs of words are pretty much the same.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-18, 9:24
by eskandar
vijayjohn wrote:
I used to think that Chicago with /ʃ/ was a Chicago dialect thing... only later I realised it's the standard English pronunciation (at least everywhere in the US).
I've been wondering if Chicago with /tʃ/ is common among non-American English speakers.

I have never heard anyone ever pronounce this word with /tʃ/ in any language.

I've always heard Chicanos pronounce this word with /tʃ/ and never with /ʃ/, actually. Though I wonder if Mexicans who live in Chicago say it with /ʃ/.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-18, 12:26
by vijayjohn
eskandar wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
I used to think that Chicago with /ʃ/ was a Chicago dialect thing... only later I realised it's the standard English pronunciation (at least everywhere in the US).
I've been wondering if Chicago with /tʃ/ is common among non-American English speakers.

I have never heard anyone ever pronounce this word with /tʃ/ in any language.

I've always heard Chicanos pronounce this word with /tʃ/ and never with /ʃ/, actually. Though I wonder if Mexicans who live in Chicago say it with /ʃ/.

I don't think I've ever heard Chicanos talk about Chicago. :lol: To be fair, it would make more sense in Spanish since /tʃ/ exists (in Spanish) but not /ʃ/.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-18, 12:51
by linguoboy
Though there are several Mexican dialects where /tʃ/ is deaffricated to [ʃ] and others where /tʃ/ contrasts with /ʃ/, which confuses the picture somewhat.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 3:30
by vijayjohn
linguoboy wrote:Though there are several Mexican dialects where /tʃ/ is deaffricated to [ʃ] and others where /tʃ/ contrasts with /ʃ/, which confuses the picture somewhat.

Really? :shock: Huh, I guess that's true! I didn't realize that.

I'm going through the Dravidian Etymological Dictionary page by page and trying to find the first Malayalam word I don't already know. Not much there, it seems. So much of the data is just wrong, as I'm sure I've said before.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 9:04
by dEhiN
Pour les gens qui parlent les deux le français et l'espagnol et qui connaissent la chanson « Despacito » , j'ai besoin de votre aide : quelle reprise en français est meilleur entre celui-ci et celui-là ? Les paroles sont différentes et je veux savoir quelle reprise et plus proche d'original ?

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 12:28
by IpseDixit
I've always been curious about the Spanish habit of respelling any* loanword the Spanish way (e.g: football --> fútbol, meeting --> mitin, leader --> lider), over here if you did that, you'd be laughed at and taken for someone belonging to the uncultured riffraff. I'd really like to know what the cause of these two diametrically opposed approaches to loanwords is.

*not sure about "any" tbh, but at least seemingly many.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 12:41
by Saim
IpseDixit wrote:*not sure about "any" tbh, but at least seemingly many.


They maintain the spellings of some recent loans but they tend to put them in italics.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 14:48
by linguoboy
IpseDixit wrote:I've always been curious about the Spanish habit of respelling any* loanword the Spanish way (e.g: football --> fútbol, meeting --> mitin, leader --> lider), over here if you did that, you'd be laughed at and taken for someone belonging to the uncultured riffraff. I'd really like to know what the cause of these two diametrically opposed approaches to loanwords is.

Do you think the fact that Spain was being ruled by a Fascist 30 years later than Italy has anything to do with it?

Respellings used to be more common in German, even of proper names. (Older publications use "Chikago" and "San Franzisko", for instance.) But recommendations from the 1996 reform like "Kautsch" for Couch were non-starters.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 16:18
by Luís
In Brazilian Portuguese you can come across things such as leiaute and blecaute.

Not as common in European Portuguese when it comes to recent loanwords, but older ones definitely get a respelling.

football -> futebol
handball -> andebol
soutien -> sutiã
chauffeur -> chofer
whisky -> uísque
dossier -> dossiê
beef -> bife
tennis -> ténis
spaghetti -> espa(r)guete

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 19:38
by Michael
How accurate is this? Is Croatian really that much closer to Russian in lexicon than Serbian?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYdZrvtJyR4

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-19, 20:05
by IpseDixit
Michael wrote:How accurate is this?


How accurate can a (very probably) cherry-picked, small sample of words be?

Just to clarify: I'm not saying that what they're claiming is false, I'm simply saying that the methodology to prove it is ridiculously flawed.

However the intents of the video are clearly humorous and I'm not sure they're really "claiming" anything.

Re: Random language thread 5

Posted: 2017-07-20, 0:01
by vijayjohn
That's odd, I always thought it was Serbian that was lexically closer to Russian...

I sit next to a Slovak colleague at work who sits next to a Czech colleague. Since yesterday, they've been starting to teach me random phrases in their languages. Yesterday, it was a phrase in Czech that the Slovak lady wrote out with a translation as follows (at least, I think this was exactly what she wrote. She has kind of cursivy handwriting, so I'm not 100% sure): "nemelkovat, nezahàlet = should not talk, should not idle." Today, it was a phrase in some nonstandard dialect of Slovak that I wrote down in my notebook as kúci kúci chodzi dzeci robi, which apparently means something like 'wherever he goes, he makes babies'. Apparently, it's a line from a Slovak movie that she says is really good.

Then she said they were going to teach me one phrase in Slovak every day, and then in two weeks, I'd speak fluent Slovak. :P