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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2016-10-02, 5:11
by vijayjohn
OldBoring wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
OldBoring wrote:So aside from the perceived social status, let's say that the main difference is that a barman serves alcohol and a barista coffee, to put it simply.

I'm not sure how commonly "barman" is used in English (I don't think I've ever even heard that word, just "bartender"), but other than that, yes. :)

Barman is British English and the anglicism used in Italy.

I just realized I forgot that people already discussed this in this thread! :lol:

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2016-10-02, 11:55
by Car
Kenny wrote:Oh, lesson there then. I wasn't aware those two were distinct things, Car - then again, my German would probably be bested by a 3-year-old native (but I just started working on it again). :-)

The concepts are related, though. Just look at how duden.de defines Wellness:
http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/Wellness
and wellnessen:
http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/wellnessen

Good to "hear" you've started working on it again. :)

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-18, 20:23
by Dormouse559
(fr) peps - pep, energy
English meaning: plural of "pep". But for me, "pep" is uncountable, so not even that. French in turn uses this plural form as a singular uncountable.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 9:51
by Ciarán12
(pt-BR) dating - a date (romantic)
English - "dating" is used to refer to the act of going on dates (or the continuous participle of "to date"), but not to refer to a specific date. "I'm going on a dating" is wrong, it's "I'm going on a date".

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 11:41
by Osias
Nunca vi ninguém falar isso mas acredito 100%

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 13:09
by Ciarán12
Osias wrote:Nunca vi ninguém falar isso mas acredito 100%


Vc nunca marcou um "deitim" com alguém? :P

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 13:41
by Osias
Ih, menino, eu só beijei na boca depois dos 30 anos, eu comecei namorar pela internet e só saí com a namorada quando já estava namorando.

E todo mundo que eu conheço nem fala "date" nem "encontro", fala só "vou sair com fulano/a". "Encontro" é coisa que eu só vejo na televisão mesmo, geralmente em série ou filme traduzido. Uma vez ou outra pode ter acontecido de falarem "encontro", mas é raro.

Esses dias rolou uma hashtag "#dateruim" no twitter, mas acho que já foi uma ideia importada. Sei lá. Podia ser "#baddate", né? :hmm: #ontopic

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 14:03
by Ciarán12
Osias wrote:E todo mundo que eu conheço nem fala "date" nem "encontro", fala só "vou sair com fulano/a". "Encontro" é coisa que eu só vejo na televisão mesmo, geralmente em série ou filme traduzido. Uma vez ou outra pode ter acontecido de falarem "encontro", mas é raro.


Faz sentido, dizemos "to go out with someone" mais frequentamente do que "to go on a date with someone" até em inglês (aqui na irlanda pelo menos). Eu ouvi "marcar um encontro" também, mas achei que isso pode significar "encontrar alguém (de propósito, conforme um plano, mas não espacificamente no sentido romântico)" também, não é?

Osias wrote:Esses dias rolou uma hashtag "#dateruim" no twitter, mas acho que já foi uma ideia importada. Sei lá. Podia ser "#baddate", né? :hmm: #ontopic


Pode ser, não sei nada do twitter.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-21, 14:15
by Osias
Ciarán12 wrote:
Osias wrote:E todo mundo que eu conheço nem fala "date" nem "encontro", fala só "vou sair com fulano/a". "Encontro" é coisa que eu só vejo na televisão mesmo, geralmente em série ou filme traduzido. Uma vez ou outra pode ter acontecido de falarem "encontro", mas é raro.


Faz sentido, dizemos "to go out with someone" mais frequentemente do que "to go on a date with someone" até em inglês (aqui na Irlanda pelo menos). Eu ouvi "marcar um encontro" também, mas acho que isso pode significar "encontrar alguém (de propósito, conforme um plano, mas não especificamente no sentido romântico)" também, não é?

Sim.

Osias wrote:Esses dias rolou uma hashtag "#dateruim" no twitter, mas acho que já foi uma ideia importada. Sei lá. Podia ser "#baddate", né? :hmm: #ontopic


Pode ser, não sei nada do twitter.
Não precisa saber de Tuíter pra isso, é um fenômeno normal na língua até fora da Internet, essas misturas.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-11-24, 15:33
by OldBoring
Did someone already mention (pt-br) shopping?

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-12-24, 5:31
by vijayjohn
OldBoring wrote:Did someone already mention (pt-br) shopping?

On this thread, no. (I didn't learn that word until I recently came across it in a video).

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2017-12-24, 16:37
by Linguaphile
I know that many (maybe all?) of these are shared by other European languages, and some probably ended up in Estonian through them rather than directly from English, but...
(et) dress - tracksuit, gym suit
(et) greip - grapefruit
(et) kombinesoon - overalls, onesie
(et) novell - short story
(et) smoking - dinner jacket, tuxedo (in other words, a type of suit; and by coincidence, suits in Estonian means smoke, so the meanings are somewhat reversed in the two languages)

Another, which isn't an Anglicism since it comes from French, nevertheless strikes me as funny when I see it (yeah, I know that it's the English meaning of séance that's the odd one though):
(et) seanss - showing (of a film), session

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-25, 18:45
by הענט
(cs) gamesa (videogame)

Šopovat (to go shopping)

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-25, 18:51
by linguoboy
Hent wrote:(cs) gamesa (videogame)

Wait, so they took the plural form and gave it a feminine singular ending? Is there a precedent for that?

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-25, 21:14
by OldBoring
vijayjohn wrote:
OldBoring wrote:Did someone already mention (pt-br) shopping?

On this thread, no. (I didn't learn that word until I recently came across it in a video).

Wait, you already knew the word. You just didn't know what it meant in pt-br. :P

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-25, 21:27
by vijayjohn
OldBoring wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
OldBoring wrote:Did someone already mention (pt-br) shopping?

On this thread, no. (I didn't learn that word until I recently came across it in a video).

Wait, you already knew the word. You just didn't know what it meant in pt-br. :P

I mean the word in pt-br. That's not the same as the word in English. ;)

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-26, 1:18
by JackFrost
(fr-qc) steamé steamed hotdogs. Popular fast-food staple in Quebec as they're cheaper than the (fr-qc) toastés (grilled hotdogs).

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-26, 8:56
by הענט
linguoboy wrote:
Hent wrote:(cs) gamesa (videogame)

Wait, so they took the plural form and gave it a feminine singular ending? Is there a precedent for that?


I know, right? It's probably because gamea wouldn't be understood and gama would be misunderstood for gamma ( as in gamma ray). Videohra or simply hra is way more common.

And hra is also feminine so they kept the gender.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-26, 18:25
by linguoboy
Hent wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Hent wrote:(cs) gamesa (videogame)

Wait, so they took the plural form and gave it a feminine singular ending? Is there a precedent for that?

I know, right? It's probably because gamea wouldn't be understood and gama would be misunderstood for gamma ( as in gamma ray). Videohra or simply hra is way more common.

And hra is also feminine so they kept the gender.

And here I'd always thought of Czech as a language that preferred to respell borrowings (e.g. tým, hokej, čip). Polish, for instance, apparently has gejm (which pluralises irregularly as gejmsy).

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-01-27, 13:55
by הענט
Yes it does, but not always. For example cash flow is never keš flou. Unless someone can't spell.

Laser is spelled and pronounced the same way as in English
(Lejzr) unlike the Russian лазер (lazer).

I don't think there are any rules for the way borrowing are spelled or pronounced except the time it was introduced. Or maybe because words like víkend and gauč are not looked upon as borrowing whereas fake news, upstart, hoax or selfie are.
I don't like the word hoax, because we already have a nice way of saying it - novinářská kachna (journalistic duck). :)


Tým - a football team, group of co-workers etc.
Teambuilding - I've never seen týmbyldyng or anything like that.