Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-12, 20:43

I've heard "freshman, sophomore, etc." used pretty often where I live. My university uses the words alongside "first year, second year, etc." and defines them in terms of units taken. That can get tricky sometimes because your chronological year in college might not line up with your "unit year".
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-08-14, 6:16

I've never liked the bizarre, un-intuitive American practice of referring to students as "freshmen" etc., just as I've never liked many other facets of the American education system (frats, legacy spots, the obsession with college sports). I also find it to be kind of a slap in the face to people who - unlike the minority of privileged white Ivy Leaguers who this system was probably devised for - don't finish their degrees according to this regimented schedule and might be forced to take some time off from school, only attend part-time, etc. and may not finish in the prescribed four years. I find it to my advantage that I can be intentionally vague and avoid prying questions: in my first year I said I was in my second year (because I had previously done a worthless year at another school), in my second year I said I was in second year, in my third I said I was in third, and in my fourth now I say I'm in third (because I am according to the number of credits I have), and in my last I'll say I'm in fourth. It's nobody else's business how old I am or how long I've been working on my degree for; my reasons for being a mature student are quite personal and I would rather not discuss them with randoms.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-08-14, 12:34

Well, this system also allows you to be vague about which year you're in. :) Here, I think we use that system primarily for high school, not so much for college. I did high school and college each in three years instead of four (because I couldn't wait to get to the next stage in each case :P). In my first year of high school, I said I was a "freshman"; in my second year, I'm pretty sure I said I was a "sophomore"; and in my third year, I said I was a "senior." (Ironically, it was actually the second-year courses, not the third-year ones, that I skipped by taking correspondence courses for them over the summer). I guess it was easier to tell people I was graduating early than to explain to them how I managed to go from taking first-year courses directly to taking third-year courses. (Also, seniors have privileges for some dumb reason, so people are way less likely to question them, too :twisted:).

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby TeneReef » 2016-08-14, 12:49

hepiend (Croatian) - happy ending
ful dobro (Croatian) - very good
frendica (Croatian) - female friend, (girl's) girlfriend
na svakodnevnoj bazi (Croatian) - on everyday basis (literal translation!)
imati seks (Croatian) - have sex (literal translation!)
:mrgreen:
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-17, 19:21

[flag=]fr[/flag] recordman/recordwoman - (world) record holder
English meaning: None, but the meaning is transparent. The reformed plurals of the terms are recordmans and recordwomans.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Osias » 2016-08-18, 0:24

[flag=]pt-br[/flag]barman - bartender
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby TeneReef » 2016-08-18, 0:46

Osias wrote:[flag=]pt-br[/flag]barman - bartender

Barman is UK English, bartender is US English

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/diction ... ish/barman
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-18, 1:25

Osias wrote:[flag=]pt-br[/flag]barman - bartender

This term is current in American English as well (although less frequently encountred than bartender). (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/barman#English)
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Osias » 2016-08-18, 1:40

Oh, well, some youtubers need to get updated about that.

I hope this one still counts:

[flag=]pt-br[/flag] smoking - tuxedo
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Ser » 2016-08-18, 2:21

TeneReef wrote:ful dobro (Croatian) - very good

Quebec French uses "full" meaning "very" too. Full québécois, full fucké (crazy as hell), full poche (very bad)...

In El Salvador, people say fulear, for "filling [one's car's tank]". When people go to a gas station they often say "fuléemelo por favor". You can also just say "full por favor" in this situation though (and it's about the only situation where we use "full").
Last edited by Ser on 2016-08-18, 6:09, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-18, 3:15

Serafín wrote:
TeneReef wrote:ful dobro (Croatian) - very good

Quebec French uses "full" meaning "very" too. Full québécois, full fucké (crazy as hell), full poche (very bad)...

Twenty years ago now, I asked a Québécoise what the current word for "cool" was, and she told me that to show her enthusiastic approval of something, her teenaged niece would say, "C'est full flash!"
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby OldBoring » 2016-08-18, 7:34

Once a Peruvian friend told me that his online game account was "full cash" while speaking Italian.
"Cash" being a virtual currency you purchase with real money and so you can buy stuff to tweak your game account.
I guess it means "full of cash, with a lot of cash".
I wonder if full used this way is common in Peruvian Spanish.

vijayjohn wrote:Well, this system also allows you to be vague about which year you're in. :) Here, I think we use that system primarily for high school, not so much for college. I did high school and college each in three years instead of four (because I couldn't wait to get to the next stage in each case :P). In my first year of high school, I said I was a "freshman"; in my second year, I'm pretty sure I said I was a "sophomore"; and in my third year, I said I was a "senior." (Ironically, it was actually the second-year courses, not the third-year ones, that I skipped by taking correspondence courses for them over the summer). I guess it was easier to tell people I was graduating early than to explain to them how I managed to go from taking first-year courses directly to taking third-year courses. (Also, seniors have privileges for some dumb reason, so people are way less likely to question them, too :twisted:).

Yeah, I don't see any difference between 1st, 2nd etc. year and freshman etc. in allowing to be vague.
Here the "American" system is only used for college, since college (undergrad) is 4 years, while high school is 3 years.
The exception is medical schools, where the undergraduate is 5 years. I wonder how you can say 5th year... extra-senior?
Even here in China most people aren't aware that medical schools are 5 years, so when I say that I'm in 大五 (5th year) people assume I'm in the 1st year of grad school, lol.

Osias wrote:[flag=]pt-br[/flag]barman - bartender

Funnily enough, in English a fancy bartender is a barista, while in Italy an ordinary bartender is a barista and a fancy bartender is barman.

I feel that the different terms are useful to distinguish the two types:
-a barman/bartender (only the first one is understood in Italy) serves (mainly) alcohol in bars;
-a barista serves (mainly) coffee in coffee bars / cafés (that's what bar means in Italian).

Maybe a bar is considered fancy in Italy, so a bartender making cocktails is fancier than one who makes coffee.
While in English-speaking country a café is considered fancier than a bar, so a bartender making espressos and lattes is considered fancy.

Which leads to:

[flag=]it[/flag] bar - coffee bar, café

In Italy it makes sense to call them "bar" since they really have bars where you can drink a coffee standing. So I feel better translation in English would be coffee bar, cause they are rather different from cafés.
Then you also have more high-ended places called caffè instead of bar, and that's more similar to a café in other countries.
While a bar that serves mainly alcohol and is opened at night is called pub, from British English.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-18, 19:00

OldBoring wrote:Funnily enough, in English a fancy bartender is a barista, while in Italy an ordinary bartender is a barista and a fancy bartender is barman.
I don't know if "barista" really means "fancy bartender" in English, not anymore anyway. For me, it simply means someone who serves coffee in a coffee shop. If the word ever had any kind of cachet, it's possible the ubiquity of Starbucks has diminished it; all the employees who make its drinks are called baristas.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby lyle1996 » 2016-08-23, 17:02

German is full of them, heres a few I can remember:

[flag=]de-de[/flag] Beamer = [flag=]en-gb[/flag] projector
[flag=]en-gb[/flag] beamer = slang for BMW

[flag=]de-de[/flag] Handy = [flag=]en-gb[/flag] mobile phone = [flag=]en-us[/flag] cell phone
[flag=]en-gb[/flag] handy = useful

[flag=]de-de[/flag] Oldtimer = [flag=]en-gb[/flag] classic car
[flag=]en-gb[/flag] oldtimer = old person

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby OldBoring » 2016-10-01, 13:47

Dormouse559 wrote:I don't know if "barista" really means "fancy bartender" in English, not anymore anyway. For me, it simply means someone who serves coffee in a coffee shop. If the word ever had any kind of cachet, it's possible the ubiquity of Starbucks has diminished it; all the employees who make its drinks are called baristas.

Thanks for the clarification. :)
So aside from the perceived social status, let's say that the main difference is that a barman serves alcohol and a barista coffee, to put it simply.

lyle1996 wrote:[flag=]de-de[/flag] Handy = [flag=]en-gb[/flag] mobile phone = [flag=]en-us[/flag] cell phone

I think both Japanese and Korean call it "handphone", and in many other Asian countries too. I often see HP in China too.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Kenny » 2016-10-01, 15:34

We have wellness in Hungarian (also in German, but I've also seen the native word "Wohlfühl" IIRC), which I don't believe is used the same way in English.

Going to a spa for the weekend would be "wellnesezni" and we have "wellness hotels" which translate to high-end hotels with spa facilities, massages and such. But do tell me if I'm mistaken and this has gained traction in actual English-speaking countries.

French is chock-full of these, including "bowling" for a bowling alley, "footing" as a synonym for jogging, "parking" for a parking lot.

"Old timer", which was mentioned in one of the posts above, is also used in Hungarian to refer to vintage cars rather than old people.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-10-01, 15:37

OldBoring wrote:So aside from the perceived social status, let's say that the main difference is that a barman serves alcohol and a barista coffee, to put it simply.

I'm not sure how commonly "barman" is used in English (I don't think I've ever even heard that word, just "bartender"), but other than that, yes. :)

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby OldBoring » 2016-10-01, 15:57

vijayjohn wrote:
OldBoring wrote:So aside from the perceived social status, let's say that the main difference is that a barman serves alcohol and a barista coffee, to put it simply.

I'm not sure how commonly "barman" is used in English (I don't think I've ever even heard that word, just "bartender"), but other than that, yes. :)

Barman is British English and the anglicism used in Italy.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Car » 2016-10-01, 16:32

Kenny wrote:We have wellness in Hungarian (also in German, but I've also seen the native word "Wohlfühl" IIRC), which I don't believe is used the same way in English.

Going to a spa for the weekend would be "wellnesezni" and we have "wellness hotels" which translate to high-end hotels with spa facilities, massages and such. But do tell me if I'm mistaken and this has gained traction in actual English-speaking countries.

"Old timer", which was mentioned in one of the posts above, is also used in Hungarian to refer to vintage cars rather than old people.

Wohlfühl (as part of compounds, it can't be used on its own) isn't the same as Wellness. Sure, you can speak of a Wohlfühlhotel, but that's not the same concept as Wellnesshotel which are what you described for Hungarian.

I don't know if it was mentioned above, but "Oldtimer" also has that meaning in German.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Kenny » 2016-10-01, 23:00

Oh, lesson there then. I wasn't aware those two were distinct things, Car - then again, my German would probably be bested by a 3-year-old native (but I just started working on it again). :-)


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