Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Varislintu » 2016-08-04, 19:30

I've realised that the clothing item for babies that's known as a body in Finnish and Swedish isn't called anything remotely like that in English (?). I've come to understand that it's called a baby romper. This made me curious as to where body came from. Finnish probably took it from Swedish usage, but where did Swedish take it from?
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-04, 19:42

Varislintu wrote:I've realised that the clothing item for babies that's known as a body in Finnish and Swedish isn't called anything remotely like that in English (?). I've come to understand that it's called a baby romper. This made me curious as to where body came from. Finnish probably took it from Swedish usage, but where did Swedish take it from?

I've never heard of a piece of clothing called a "romper", though Wikipedia tells me it's one-piece garment which combines shorts and a shirt. This is extremely similar to the garment I know as a "onesie". Again, Wikipedia tells me that the generic name for this is "infant bodysuit".

So, at a guess, "[infant] bodysuit" > "body".
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Varislintu » 2016-08-04, 19:55

linguoboy wrote:
Varislintu wrote:I've realised that the clothing item for babies that's known as a body in Finnish and Swedish isn't called anything remotely like that in English (?). I've come to understand that it's called a baby romper. This made me curious as to where body came from. Finnish probably took it from Swedish usage, but where did Swedish take it from?

I've never heard of a piece of clothing called a "romper", though Wikipedia tells me it's one-piece garment which combines shorts and a shirt. This is extremely similar to the garment I know as a "onesie". Again, Wikipedia tells me that the generic name for this is "infant bodysuit".

So, at a guess, "[infant] bodysuit" > "body".


Really? :shock: Wow, I thought I had actually looked into this before bringing it up here, but I somehow missed all that. Thanks! That certainly makes sense. :yep:
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Luís » 2016-08-04, 20:00

Varislintu wrote:I've realised that the clothing item for babies that's known as a body in Finnish and Swedish isn't called anything remotely like that in English (?). I've come to understand that it's called a baby romper. This made me curious as to where body came from. Finnish probably took it from Swedish usage, but where did Swedish take it from?


We use that in Portuguese as well.

I suppose it comes from (British) English body "woman’s close-fitting stretch garment for the upper body, fastening at the crotch."
Quite similar to those babies wear.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Varislintu » 2016-08-04, 20:13

Luís wrote:I suppose it comes from (British) English body "woman’s close-fitting stretch garment for the upper body, fastening at the crotch."
Quite similar to those babies wear.


Oh, that can be called a body, too, in English? I only knew the words leotard and unitard (both of which are very funny sounding words :lol:).
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-08-05, 3:52

I've never heard that kind of clothing called a "body", only a leotard. There's also the word "bodysuit", which I thought covered the whole body but apparently can also mean something more like a leotard.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby OldBoring » 2016-08-05, 5:46

Yea, that's called body in a lot of European languages, but not in English. Maybe an abbreviation of bodysuit?

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-05, 7:32

Not unheard of. The French word (and a lot of other languages' words apparently) for "tuxedo" is smoking, shortened from "smoking jacket".
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Car » 2016-08-05, 20:00

Like Luís wrote, it's British English:
clothing
[countable] (British English) (North American English bodysuit) a piece of clothing which fits tightly over a woman’s upper body and bottom, usually fastening between the legs


http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.c ... glish/body
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-05, 20:03

Never heard that usage of "body" before, but maybe I'm not watching the right programmes.

[flag=]es[/flag] ticket receipt
Last edited by linguoboy on 2016-08-05, 21:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Ser » 2016-08-05, 20:47

OldBoring wrote:school - 学院, department of a university, or college constituting a university.
college - 学院, either same as "school" above or a university institution with only one "college".

That use of "school" is common in Canadian English ("The Joseph L. Rotman School of Management", "Sauder School of Business", "UBC School of Music", "BCIT School of Computing and Academic Studies", etc.). Maybe you got it from us. :P Using the word "college" like this is also common in the US and the UK.

"College" is also used in Canada and the US for what are basically higher education institutions focused in an area, like liberal arts colleges such as Wheaton College. This use of "college" seems similar to the second use of "college" in the English produced in China that you mention.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Ser » 2016-08-05, 20:59

My favourite pseudo-Anglicism in Salvadoran Spanish is mix y mix 'more or less' (the adverb, not the quantifying demonstrative).

    —¿Cómo estuvo la fiesta?
    —Mix y mix.

    "How was the party?"
    "More or less (good)." ~ "Was alright."

Ok, it's not quite a pseudo-anglicism as much as it is a term formed with an anglicism. The conjunction y in the middle is ostensibly not an English word.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Luís » 2016-08-05, 21:08

linguoboy wrote:Never heard this usage before, but maybe I'm not watching the right programmes.

[flag=]es[/flag] ticket receipt


That's not a Pseudo-Anglicism, but rather French ;)

At least in Portuguese we even pronounce it /ti'ke/.

It seems French borrowed "ticket" from English back in the 18th century, which in turn came from French "estiquet". So yeah, that word kept going back and forth across the Channel.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Ser » 2016-08-05, 21:22

Yeah, some speakers pronounce it [tiˈkete] in Spanish even.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-08-06, 6:39

Serafín wrote:That use of "school" is common in Canadian English ("The Joseph L. Rotman School of Management", "Sauder School of Business", "UBC School of Music", "BCIT School of Computing and Academic Studies", etc.). Maybe you got it from us. :P Using the word "college" like this is also common in the US and the UK.

All of those examples sound exactly like American usage to me, too.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Varislintu » 2016-08-06, 9:51

Car wrote:Like Luís wrote, it's British English:
clothing
[countable] (British English) (North American English bodysuit) a piece of clothing which fits tightly over a woman’s upper body and bottom, usually fastening between the legs


http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.c ... glish/body


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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-12, 6:45

[flag=]fr[/flag] stripteaseur (-euse) - stripper
English meaning: The equivalent formation "stripteaser" exists apparently, but it sounds odd to me. "Stripper" is a lot more common in my experience.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby OldBoring » 2016-08-12, 15:03

[flag=]it[/flag] ticket - prescription charge of the National Healthcare

Serafín wrote:—Mix y mix.

Reminds me of Argentinian Spanish maso maso.

Serafín wrote:That use of "school" is common in Canadian English ("The Joseph L. Rotman School of Management", "Sauder School of Business", "UBC School of Music", "BCIT School of Computing and Academic Studies", etc.). Maybe you got it from us. :P Using the word "college" like this is also common in the US and the UK.

"College" is also used in Canada and the US for what are basically higher education institutions focused in an area, like liberal arts colleges such as Wheaton College. This use of "college" seems similar to the second use of "college" in the English produced in China that you mention.

Nice eh.
I've found out that some "higher education institutions focused in an area" call themselves "university" in English, even when they are 学院 in Chinese. :shock: Translations into English are far from being consistent.

What seems unique in China is that international students are all grouped in their own classes, and are considered a separate "college", hence universities that accept international students have an "International School" or "International College".

vijayjohn wrote:All of those examples sound exactly like American usage to me, too.

On top of that, in China they use college the American way to mean "university" in general in daily life, like "going to college", "college student". The most widespread English textbook for universities is also called "College English" (Chinese: 大学英语). They also use the American words freshman, sophomore, junior, senior. And consider it wrong to say "first year student", "second year student", etc.

In Italy people also use college to mean "American university", because American movies dubbed into Italian use the word "college", they don't translate it. For us, "college" has become associated with university campuses with dorms and all the services cause students live inside. While Italian universities tend to have only classrooms and libraries, and very limited dorms available.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Ser » 2016-08-12, 18:23

On top of that, in China they use college the American way to mean "university" in general in daily life, like "going to college", "college student". The most widespread English textbook for universities is also called "College English" (Chinese: 大学英语).

That's perfectly normal Canadian and American usage. It's a bit colloquial.
And consider it wrong to say "first year student", "second year student", etc.

I see. Yeah, in Canada we usually say "second year student", etc.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-12, 18:44

Serafín wrote:
And consider it wrong to say "first year student", "second year student", etc.

I see. Yeah, in Canada we usually say "second year student", etc.

At my university (Chicago), we used "first-year", "second-year", etc. (up to the tongue-in-cheek "nth-year student"), but we were exceptional in this respect. I don't think I know of another US university that prefers this scheme to "freshman", "sophomore", etc. and I ascribed it to the fact that many students at Chicago finished their undergraduate degrees in more or less than four years.
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