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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-05, 18:30
by linguoboy
(ko) 비닐 < (en) vinyl
(ko) 플라스틱 < (en) plastic

According to Using Korean: a guide to contemporary usage, the Korean words really meaning something like "soft plastic" and "hard plastic", respectively. So "plastic bag" would most commonly correspond to 비닐봉지 /pinilpongci/ in Korean.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-23, 8:35
by Ciarán12
(pt-br) fitness (en) fit

"Malhar é bom para a saúde e te faz fitness."
"Working out is good for your health and makes you fit."

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-23, 10:37
by atalarikt
(id)(jv) charge/cas [tʃas] charge (as in, charging battery)

"Tolong cas HP Ibu!" = "Please charge Mother's phone!"

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-23, 23:31
by languagepotato
I don't know how widespread the words for fist bump are in the rest of the Netherlands but in my area they're quite common

(nl) power/box - fist bump
(nl) coffeeshop - cafe-like establishment where they sell cannabis

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-24, 0:42
by linguoboy
languagepotato wrote:(nl) power/box - fist bump

Is this one word or two?

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-24, 3:31
by vijayjohn
linguoboy wrote:
languagepotato wrote:(nl) power/box - fist bump

Is this one word or two?

Probably two. The Dutch Wikipedia article for vuistje begins with the words: "Het vuistje, boks of fistbump, is een informele begroeting..."

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-03-24, 16:04
by languagepotato
vijayjohn wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
languagepotato wrote:(nl) power/box - fist bump

Is this one word or two?

Probably two. The Dutch Wikipedia article for vuistje begins with the words: "Het vuistje, boks of fistbump, is een informele begroeting..."


Two indeed, they're synonyms

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-07-04, 18:31
by Ciarán12
(pt-br) um black-power
(en-gb) an afro (haircut)

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-09-16, 9:19
by Ciarán12
(pt-br) um cover
(en-gb) a double, a doppleganger

"Cover" in English is used in reference to music to mean a version of a song performed by a different artist to the original one, in Portuguese they've sort of extended that to portraying an actual person. They have their own word for this already - sósia - but hey, English sounds sophisticated I guess...

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-09-16, 14:25
by vijayjohn
Korean (ko) 화이팅! hwaiting! / 파이팅! paiting! - good luck, go (for it; also used in sports games)
Japanese (ja) ファイト faito - fight, competitive (especially boxing) match, fighting spirit in sports, go for it, don't give up, take heart
English (en) fight(ing)

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-09-16, 19:33
by OldBoring
Add oil!

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2018-10-30, 12:41
by Car
(fr)(es) footing
(en) jogging

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 16:17
by vijayjohn
[jɛsˈtiɖi] in Malayalam at least means a regular phone call (as opposed to a collect call), from the term standard trunk dialing. Probably not used much these days given the proliferation of cell phones at the beginning of the century.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 21:32
by OldBoring
vijayjohn wrote:[jɛsˈtiɖi] in Malayalam at least means a regular phone call (as opposed to a collect call), from the term standard trunk dialing. Probably not used much these days given the proliferation of cell phones at the beginning of the century.

At first I was like wtf is yestidi? Then I remembered S is pronounced yes in Mayalayam Malayalam.

So it doesn't mean sexually transmitted disease?

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 22:05
by vijayjohn
Some people are familiar with that use of the term nowadays, but everyone at least used to know it to mean simply 'phone call'. I think it's still possible to find phone booths all over India with "STD" written in big letters on the side (usually vertically).

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 22:32
by Saim
linguoboy wrote:Polish, for instance, apparently has gejm (which pluralises irregularly as gejmsy).


This -s infix has generalised to recent foreign loans in general: Latynosi, naczosy, czipsy... and in some cases (probably having to do with avoiding the vowel ending) it is carried back into the singular - on jest Latynosem.

vijayjohn wrote:[jɛsˈtiɖi] in Malayalam at least means a regular phone call (as opposed to a collect call), from the term standard trunk dialing. Probably not used much these days given the proliferation of cell phones at the beginning of the century.


How does standard become [jɛsˈtiɖi]?

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 22:52
by vijayjohn
It doesn't, sorry. It's an abbreviation.

Standard Trunk Dialing -> STD -> [jɛsˈtiɖi]

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-21, 23:47
by OldBoring

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-01-22, 3:19
by vijayjohn
Both exist, and standard is the one I encountered first. AFAICT there isn't a difference between standard trunk dialing and subscriber trunk dialing.

Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Posted: 2019-02-28, 18:41
by linguoboy
(ko) 서비스 < (en) service

In addition to meaning "service" in the general sense, 서비스 can also have the specific meaning of "something provided for free", e.g. 이 커피는 서비스 입니다. lit. "This coffee is a service" = "This coffee is on the house."