Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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IpseDixit
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2016-08-27, 14:24

Yasna wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:And btw, this leads me to a mini-rant: I can't stand how some non native English speakers use super colloquial, obscure slang terms taken from God knows which dialect(s) of the English language just to give a (quite blatantly false) impression of full mastery of the language.

I don't think I've ever experienced this. The issue I see from time to time is non-native speakers overusing colloquial language in an attempt to sound more fluent, which just sounds awkward.


Yeah, that too.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-08-27, 14:30

What I've seen from (especially younger) Indians online is...this weird combination of Indian English and...like, American slang. Which also sounds awkward to me. I specifically recall seeing "hack and slash whatever you feel like, dude" (OK, I guess that's basically just unexpected American slang for me) and my favorite (by an Indian guy who was regretting that he forgot about my birthday), "Oh ****! I missed it. Belated B-day greetings to you, dude!" "Belated B-day greetings to you" is exactly the sort of thing Indians would say, and then he tagged "dude" (and "oh ****" :lol:) onto it. :P

EDIT: Note that he did NOT write an actual curse word there. "****" was exactly how he originally wrote it.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-08-27, 15:14

vijayjohn wrote: I've never heard of that phrase being used like that, and I'm skeptical that it really means that especially given the search results in Google for it. Urban Dictionary generally doesn't seem to be a very reliable resource.
I'm not so skeptical. The term might not be quite so specific, though. I'd bet it can mean generally "indulgent cuddling" or "an indulgent embrace", which could run the gamut from highly sexual to familial or platonic.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-08-27, 15:53

Dormouse559 wrote:
vijayjohn wrote: I've never heard of that phrase being used like that, and I'm skeptical that it really means that especially given the search results in Google for it. Urban Dictionary generally doesn't seem to be a very reliable resource.
I'm not so skeptical. The term might not be quite so specific, though. I'd bet it can mean generally "indulgent cuddling" or "an indulgent embrace", which could run the gamut from highly sexual to familial or platonic.

Yeah, that sounds reasonable to me.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Koko » 2016-09-02, 8:51

[flag=]cr[/flag] mostos — buffalo; however, it is also the word for cow, which is the meaning i learned first. It actually makes sense to use the word for buffalo for cow as well, but i wonder if there is now a way to distinguish the two, especially up here where I was pleasantly surprised to find out buffalo ranches are (pretty close to Kamloops too, somewhere around Osoyoos i think?).

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Koko » 2016-09-04, 10:36

Most important word I will ever know in the present era: [flag=]cr[/flag] môstawinawêw be sexually attracted to someone

(It being a TA verb, you could actually say "Nimôstawinwawâw pahkêsikan" (I'm sexually attracted to bread))

Time to find "romantically attracted" (but doubt it will be an easy find)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2016-09-05, 16:01

[flag=]pt[/flag]
vindouro coming, next
bagunceiro hooligan, rowdy
apaziguar to pacify, appease
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2016-09-05, 19:56

[flag=]en[/flag]
rowdy
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-05, 22:43

Osias wrote:[flag=]en[/flag]
rowdy

IME, more commonly an adjective than a noun. (In fact, my first encountre with nominal "rowdy" may have been as a Fremdwort in German.)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2016-09-06, 0:03

linguoboy wrote:
Osias wrote:[flag=]en[/flag]
rowdy

IME, more commonly an adjective than a noun. (In fact, my first encountre with nominal "rowdy" may have been as a Fremdwort in German.)

I don't think "hooligan" fits entirely also, the literal translation for bagunceiro is "maker of mess".
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-06, 3:24

Osias wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Osias wrote:[flag=]en[/flag]
rowdy

IME, more commonly an adjective than a noun. (In fact, my first encountre with nominal "rowdy" may have been as a Fremdwort in German.)

I don't think "hooligan" fits entirely also, the literal translation for bagunceiro is "maker of mess".

Maybe the translators thought it was figurative? Another (US) term for someone who deliberately causes trouble is a "shit-disturber".

A person who literally makes a mess is a "pig" or a "slob".
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2016-09-06, 14:09

To being called a pig you need to make a dirty mess, don't you? I mean, can't a bagunceiro make a lot of noise and this be called a 'mess'?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2016-09-06, 17:43

Osias wrote:To being called a pig you need to make a dirty mess, don't you? I mean, can't a bagunceiro make a lot of noise and this be called a 'mess'?

Bagunça and its adjective bagunceiro have the same root in Portuguese, but their respective equivalents in English, "mess" and "rowdy, chaotic", do not.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2016-09-06, 18:32

Michael wrote:
Osias wrote:To being called a pig you need to make a dirty mess, don't you? I mean, can't a bagunceiro make a lot of noise and this be called a 'mess'?

Bagunça and its adjective bagunceiro have the same root in Portuguese, but their respective equivalents in English, "mess" and "rowdy, chaotic", do not.

I know. I'm just trying to check if the meaning is the same.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-12, 21:42

[flag=]de[/flag] Messerspitze (in the extended sense of "pinch" [i.e. "a small quantity, such as would fit on the tip of a knife blade"])
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-09-12, 23:33

Osias wrote:To being called a pig you need to make a dirty mess, don't you? I mean, can't a bagunceiro make a lot of noise and this be called a 'mess'?
In English, being noisy is not thought of as making a mess. It might be called "making a racket" instead. ("Racket" means a lot of noise here.)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2016-09-13, 0:52

So, forget about "saudade", "bagunceiro" is the new exactly untranslatable word.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-15, 20:29

[flag=]es-MX[/flag] gamborimbo
hpéženíi
[flag=]ga[/flag] cnámhóga
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-19, 17:22

wépukxa soap (lit. "it rubs on things")
[flag=]es-AR[/flag][flag=]es-PE[/flag] ni chicha ni limonada neither fish nor fowl
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Yasna » 2016-09-28, 14:24

[flag=]ja[/flag]シャーレ (shāre) Petri dish (from the German "Schale")
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