Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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linguoboy
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-07-11, 15:18

(ca) fefaent reliable
(ca) ferum scent, stench
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-07-15, 15:40

(es) llamarada de petate flash in the pan
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-07-22, 7:29

Persian (fa) ایستادن istâdan - to stop

Perhaps more importantly, though, I learned the phrase:

جائی وسط راه می ایسته؟ Jâ'i vasat-e-râh mi-isteh? 'Does it stop anywhere along the way?'

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2019-07-24, 8:14

(es) azufre sulfur ((pt) enxofre)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-07-24, 22:25

(sv) angå concern, have to do with
(sv) dyka dive
(sv) hinna manage to, have time to
(sv) tappa lose, drop
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-07-25, 20:43

(nl) ondersteboven upside down
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2019-07-29, 21:55

(fr) Quésaco ? - What is it?

From Occitan Qu'es aquò ? "What is it?"
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Ciarán12 » 2019-07-29, 22:55

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) Quésaco ? - What is it?

:rotfl:

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby OldBoring » 2019-07-30, 8:12

Looks like Portuguese que saco

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2019-07-30, 12:27

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) Quésaco ? - What is it?

From Occitan Qu'es aquò ? "What is it?"


Interesting. I didn't know that came from Occitan.

My boss sometimes uses it, but he writes it as késako :para:
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2019-08-03, 10:20

(en) at someone's beck and call always ready to do whatever someone asks
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2019-08-04, 12:14

(fr) nibards boobs, tits (slang)
(fr) taffe drag (cigarrette or joint) (slang)
(fr) chichon marijuana (slang)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Antea » 2019-08-04, 12:18

(ru) чрезвычайных ситуаций emergency situations
(ru) рифмах rhymes

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-08-07, 14:23

(sw) mgeni guest
(sw) ndani inside
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-08-07, 16:39

(et) lükanduks sliding door
(et) uksepöör door latch; wooden toggle latch

(ay) tiranqhaya jaw
(ay) mujlli elbow

shika riches, wealth, luxury, money
hewalɛwoo encouragement, motiviation

Waanc Leiz Dangh Zingh Great Wall of China
    waanc ten thousand
    leiz (1) law, custom, tradition (same meaning as Hmong kevcai); (2) [postposition] inside
    dangh long (used for rivers, time, etc)
    zingh large city; area surrounded by a wall (cf. , เชียง, ຊຽງ)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2019-08-09, 15:13

(en-us) to play hooky - to skip school or work
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-09, 19:11

Persian (fa) مسکن maskan - dwelling, residence (I also saw this translated as 'accommodation')
Linguaphile wrote: Waanc Leiz Dangh Zingh Great Wall of China

When I saw this, I happened to be chatting with a native speaker of Chinese and remarked that I thought it was odd that in Iu Mien, it's basically 万里长城 Wànlǐ Chángchéng instead of just Dangh Zingh, i.e. 长城 Chángchéng (both expressions exist in Mandarin). Then he told me that in his native variety of Chinese, if you said just 长城, people probably wouldn't understand what you were saying.

Also, this part was interesting and kind of amusing to me:
leiz (1) law, custom, tradition (same meaning as Hmong kevcai); (2) [postposition] inside

里 can mean 'inside' in Chinese, and I think generally does these days, but not 'law, custom, tradition'. However, it was also traditionally a unit of distance, and that's what it refers to in 万里长城. Interesting that Iu Mien speakers apparently understood 里 in the sense of 'inside' rather than in the sense of a measurement.
Luís wrote:(en-us) to play hooky - to skip school or work

I think this may be kind of a regional term in the US. I think I've heard/seen some Americans claim they've never heard it before, and indeed, I haven't heard it here, either. I have read it, though, specifically in the sense of skipping school (I don't recall ever seeing it used to mean 'to skip work' except on Wiktionary).

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-08-09, 20:07

vijayjohn wrote:
leiz (1) law, custom, tradition (same meaning as Hmong kevcai); (2) [postposition] inside

里 can mean 'inside' in Chinese, and I think generally does these days, but not 'law, custom, tradition'. However, it was also traditionally a unit of distance, and that's what it refers to in 万里长城. Interesting that Iu Mien speakers apparently understood 里 in the sense of 'inside' rather than in the sense of a measurement.

Yeah, that amused me, too. But China adopted metric in 1925, so there's hardly anyone left alive who still remembers when the old Imperial measures were in use.

As for the other meanings, I assumed those derived from a homophonic Chinese borrowing such as 理.

vijayjohn wrote:
Luís wrote:(en-us) to play hooky - to skip school or work

I think this may be kind of a regional term in the US. I think I've heard/seen some Americans claim they've never heard it before, and indeed, I haven't heard it here, either.

Odd. I have trouble thinking of another expression as widely understood in the USA. Both "cut" and "ditch" strike me as more restricted youth slang.

vijayjohn wrote:I have read it, though, specifically in the sense of skipping school (I don't recall ever seeing it used to mean 'to skip work' except on Wiktionary).

I've heard it used that way before. It's a pretty natural extension, on a par with the widespread use of "school night", and has the same slightly jocular connotation.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-08-09, 20:45

vijayjohn wrote:Also, this part was interesting and kind of amusing to me:
leiz (1) law, custom, tradition (same meaning as Hmong kevcai); (2) [postposition] inside

里 can mean 'inside' in Chinese, and I think generally does these days, but not 'law, custom, tradition'. However, it was also traditionally a unit of distance, and that's what it refers to in 万里长城. Interesting that Iu Mien speakers apparently understood 里 in the sense of 'inside' rather than in the sense of a measurement.

No, it was left off inadvertently; all three meanings should have been listed. Mienh speakers use leiz for measurement too. For example "kilometer" in Mienh is gong-leiz, just like 公里 in Chinese.
Leiz actually has even more meanings than that; here is what my dictionary says:
    leiz1 law; rule; regulation or constitution
    leiz2 custom; tradition; culture; habit or practice
    leiz3 righteousness; chasteness; moral
    leiz4 a Mien family name
    leiz5 inside
That is why I compared it to Hmong kevcai, which has the same range of meaning as the first three Mienh definitions. It seemed simpler to write "same meaning as Hmong kevcai" than to write out "law, rule, regulation, constitution, custom, tradition, culture, habit, practice, righteousness, chasteness, moral," since I didn't think anyone would care to know the exact range of meaning, but I thought the parallel with the meanings of the Hmong word was kind of cool. :D

Edit, because when I posted above I hadn't seen that Linguoboy had responded as well:

linguoboy wrote:As for the other meanings, I assumed those derived from a homophonic Chinese borrowing such as 理.

Or not a Chinese borrowing at all. I have no source for Mienh etymologies, nor do I (or the Mienh speakers I know) know Chinese, but I looked up 理 and it seems quite a bit different in meaning. Not that it isn't possible that it originated from that word and the meaning changed, of course, but certainly not all Mienh words have a Chinese origin.

linguoboy wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Luís wrote:(en-us) to play hooky - to skip school or work

I think this may be kind of a regional term in the US. I think I've heard/seen some Americans claim they've never heard it before, and indeed, I haven't heard it here, either.

Odd. I have trouble thinking of another expression as widely understood in the USA. Both "cut" and "ditch" strike me as more restricted youth slang.

If "cut" and "ditch" are restricted to youth slang, then "play hooky" is restricted to elder slang (at least here). I don't think I've ever heard a school-aged child or teenager say "play hooky," even though the term is certainly known here. "Cut" and "ditch" seem far more common, or simply "skip school/work" or "be truant". "Play hooky" is fairly well-known here, but nowadays it has a sort of almost nostalgic ring to it - an adult saying of a child, "oh, he's just playing hooky, it's not a big deal" while reminiscing of having done so himself as a child. It comes off sounding both old-fashioned and dismissive.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2019-08-09, 21:27

Now "truant" is one of those words I've known for a long time but never ever heard anyone said IRL.
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