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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-22, 15:12
by linguoboy
(uk) кацап Russian [derogatory]

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-26, 21:22
by linguoboy
(ca) empat draw (sports)
(de) stillen breastfeed
(he) עוף bird

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-29, 9:46
by Gadano
pauken (de) - to learn really hard something

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-29, 14:28
by linguoboy
(ga) giobach rough, shaggy
(ga) saighid incite
(ga) spoch as tease
(ga) tionchar impact

(es) bengala flare
(es) enjambre swarm
(es-MX) parque ammo
(es) rodear surround

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-29, 17:07
by Car
linguoboy wrote:(es) bengala flare

While you're at it, you might as well want to learn (de) Bengalo as a colloquial word for flare.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-03, 11:04
by Iván
(de) saufen - to guzzle, to drink alcohol continually

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-07, 8:34
by Aleksey
linguoboy wrote:(uk) кацап Russian [derogatory]

Hello! :D
As I can remember from this https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_Quiet_Flows_the_Don

Not "кацап" but "москаль" was the right name for Russian. Of course both of this words have enough negative sense like "nigga" or "niger" ( excuse me ).
But I need notice "кацап" was used by cossacs for settled ukranians.
And if it is interesting for somebody : "гуцул" was used for man from Moldavia.
:yep:
Best regards

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-09, 15:43
by linguoboy
(osa) wéðį rope
(osa) wéšį oatmeal

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-10, 15:14
by linguoboy
(fr-QC) gratteux stingy, cheap; scratchcard

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-12, 14:34
by linguoboy
(es-MX) cuerito pickled pig skin
(it) cotica pork rind
(vi) đồ chua pickled shredded carrot and radish (lit. "sour thing")

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-17, 8:34
by Luís
(fr) beffroi belfry

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-17, 16:01
by Dormouse559
(fr)
rouleau à pâtisserie nm - rolling pin
échafaudage nm - scaffolding

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-20, 3:09
by JackFrost
linguoboy wrote:(fr-QC) gratteux stingy, cheap; scratchcard

These days, it just means the scratchcards.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-23, 19:53
by linguoboy
(ga) teilileideoir teleprompter

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-27, 15:12
by Luís
(fr) trombone paper clip (yeah, it kinda looks similar to the musical instrument when you think of it)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-27, 20:35
by Olinguito
Luís wrote:(fr) trombone paper clip (yeah, it kinda looks similar to the musical instrument when you think of it)

It can mean both.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-29, 8:21
by Luís
Olinguito wrote:
Luís wrote:(fr) trombone paper clip (yeah, it kinda looks similar to the musical instrument when you think of it)

It can mean both.


Hence my comment...

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-29, 8:34
by md0
(de) Zyprer [Cyprian]

It's in the title of a photo exhibition opening soon at the local Goethe-Institut. In class, we were taught the nationality is Zypriot. It seems like Zyprer is the term in official use. I can say that at least most Greek-Cypriots hate being referred with the non -iot term, eg Cyprian in English.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-29, 14:43
by vijayjohn
I didn't even know until now that Cyprian was a word in English.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-04-29, 14:48
by linguoboy
vijayjohn wrote:I didn't even know until now that Cyprian was a word in English.

It sounds somewhat archaic to me, at least in reference to people. According to the OED, in Victorian times it mean "licentious" and was applied to prostitutes, so I can see why modern Cypriots might not be found of it.