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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-02-25, 23:34
by SamoSamNina
dživdisaren - 'they live', in the Džambas dialect of Macedonian Romani

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-02-26, 20:14
by Prowler
(de) die Fertigstellung - the completion

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-02-26, 21:51
by linguoboy
(ca) forat de cuc wormhole
(sv) rymd space; outer space

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-02-28, 13:21
by Gadano
linguoboy wrote:
Gadano wrote:Dynks (pl)- something small, that you can't name

Daj mi ten dynks!
Give me that something!

Is Polish not your native language?

(ga) cuach abhlann ciborium


Oh, my mistake, somehow I must've thought that it's about any word that you learnt recently. My mistake, let me try again. :oops:

nyāya - a procedure, a rule; it's really old sansrkit word, today used to name one of the brahmin schools. It's more of a philosophical term now.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-02-28, 13:29
by vijayjohn
In Malayalam, it means 'justice'.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-01, 15:10
by linguoboy
(cy) rheithfarn verdict
(ga) séanas gap between the front teeth

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-01, 16:19
by Ciarán12
linguoboy wrote:(ca) forat de cuc wormhole
(sv) rymd space; outer space


What were you reading that day? Is there some sci-fi novel out there set in a Catalan-Swedish bilingual dystopian future?

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-01, 16:59
by linguoboy
Ciarán12 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(ca) forat de cuc wormhole
(sv) rymd space; outer space

What were you reading that day? Is there some sci-fi novel out there set in a Catalan-Swedish bilingual dystopian future?

I think that post crossed over from an alternative universe where such a thing exists.

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-04, 16:01
by linguoboy
(es) arenisca roja red sandstone
(ga) neamhbhuan temporary

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-05, 17:47
by linguoboy
(ca) flor de neu edelweiss
(cy) gwenithfaen granite [lit. "wheatstone"]
(ga) cearc fhraoigh moorhen

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-06, 17:14
by Ciarán12
(pt-br) relento - the air humidity of the night, that forms dew.
As in the phrase "dormir ao relento" - "to sleep rough".

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-06, 18:08
by linguoboy
Ciarán12 wrote:(pt-br) relento - the air humidity of the night, that forms dew.
As in the phrase "dormir ao relento" - "to sleep rough".

That definition is classic English As She Is Spoke.

What's the difference between relento and sereno?

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-06, 18:23
by Ciarán12
linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:(pt-br) relento - the air humidity of the night, that forms dew.
As in the phrase "dormir ao relento" - "to sleep rough".

That definition is classic English As She Is Spoke.


You mean my translation is to colloquial?

linguoboy wrote:What's the difference between relento and sereno?


As far as I know, they are synonymous in the meaning of "the air humidity of the night, that forms dew", though I don't think you can substitute sereno for relento in the phrase dormir ao relento, and sereno much more usually is used as an adjective meaning "serene".

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-06, 18:36
by linguoboy
Ciarán12 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:(pt-br) relento - the air humidity of the night, that forms dew.
As in the phrase "dormir ao relento" - "to sleep rough".

That definition is classic English As She Is Spoke.

You mean my translation is to colloquial?

I mean it sounds like a word-for-word translation of a Portuguese phrase. There are equivalents in other Romance languages (e.g. Sp. relente, Cat. rellent) and the standard English translation is "night dew". If you think that puts too much focus on the result rather than the condition, "humid night air" would work as well.

Ciarán12 wrote:As far as I know, they are synonymous in the meaning of "the air humidity of the night, that forms dew", though I don't think you can substitute sereno for relento in the phrase dormir ao relento, and sereno much more usually is used as an adjective meaning "serene".

I found numerous hits for dormir ao sereno, but many were from 19th-century works. It could be the phrase is archaic or poetic in contemporary Portuguese, though it's still current in Galician (possibly under influence of Spanish al sereno).

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-10, 13:04
by linguoboy
(es) ardid trick, ruse
(es-MX) balazera shoot-out

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-12, 7:24
by Ciarán12
(pt-br) facultativo - facultative, optional

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-13, 17:55
by linguoboy
(ga) dícheadal incantation
(osa) pxáðaži demented, confused

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-14, 14:26
by linguoboy
Tá scéalta Liam Uí Flaithbheartaigh á léagh agam arís.

(ga) cnuasach gathering, garnering; food which has been gathered or garnered [e.g. nuts, seaweed, shellfish]
(ga) díogha the worst (díogha gach díogha the worst of all)
(ga) folc downpour
(ga) gairfean roughness; rough weather
(ga) scoth-thrá exposed beach at low tide
(ga) tiormach drought
(ga) tréig abandon, forsake

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-18, 15:13
by linguoboy
(ga) airdeall watchfullness
(ga) ál brood, litter
(ga) bradal drake
(ga) crotach curlew
(ga) scailp bank [etc.]
(ga) scinn start; fly away
(ga) sconsa fence [etc.]

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Posted: 2019-03-21, 20:40
by Dormouse559
(fr) metteur (-euse) en scène - (live theater) director

I think I've come across this phrase before and gotten it through context, but it just occurred to me that it represents a distinction French makes that English doesn't. A metteur en scène works on plays while a réalisateur works on movies. In English, we call them both the "director".