Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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Yasna
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Yasna » 2018-09-18, 0:05

ceid donn wrote:(id) lusa - the day after tomorrow

This may be the most succinct word for this concept of time I've seen in any language so far.

Korean is also concise with this concept: 모레 mo-le
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-09-18, 0:08

Yasna wrote:
ceid donn wrote:(id) lusa - the day after tomorrow

This may be the most succinct word for this concept of time I've seen in any language so far.

Korean is also concise with this concept: 모레 mo-le

Hindi, Urdu, and Punjabi all have [pəɾˈsõ] meaning both 'day before yesterday' and 'day after tomorrow'.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-09-18, 13:32

(es-MX) reloj de arena - hourglass

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-18, 16:58

(cy) blaendafodi to touch with the tip of the tongue
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2018-09-18, 22:09

(fr) casser du sucre sur le dos de quelqu'un to talk about someone behind their back (lit. to break sugar in someone's back)

(fr) avoir une araignée dans le plafond to be a bit crazy (lit. to have a spider in the attic)

(es) allanar to smooth, to flatten ((pt) aplanar)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-18, 22:15

Luís wrote:(fr) avoir une araignée dans le plafond to be a bit crazy (lit. to have a spider in the attic)

Is this a regional variation? In Standard Hexagonal French, the expression is avoir une araignée au plafond. (Plafond means "ceiling". "Attic" is grenier [if used only for storage] or mansarde [if someone lives there].)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2018-09-18, 22:22

linguoboy wrote:
Luís wrote:(fr) avoir une araignée dans le plafond to be a bit crazy (lit. to have a spider in the attic)

Is this a regional variation? In Standard Hexagonal French, the expression is avoir une araignée au plafond. (Plafond means "ceiling". "Attic" is grenier [if used only for storage] or mansarde [if someone lives there].)


I have no idea, but both expressions seem to exist.

And of course, you're right about plafond. I was probably thinking of the corresponding Portuguese expression ter macacos no sótão (lit. to have monkeys in the attic) when translating from French to English... :para:
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-18, 22:25

Luís wrote:I have no idea, but both expressions seem to exist.

Interesting. Looks like there may have been some cross contamination from avoir une araignée dans le cerveau.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-19, 16:17

(cy) dilladach old clothes, worn-out clothing
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-09-20, 18:06

(gd) manadh - a vision or premonition of future events, a clairvoyant expereince (dialects in the Outer Hebrides and northern parts of the Inner Hebrides); a ghost or an evil spirit (Islay, Jura and Colonsay)

The Scottish Gaels were really into this sort of stuff--and to some extent still are. We even have our own Gaelic Nostradamus, the Brahan Seer, who apparently, in rather foreseeable irony, did not predict his own quite horrific death.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-21, 14:27

ceid donn wrote:(gd) manadh - a vision or premonition of future events, a clairvoyant expereince (dialects in the Outer Hebrides and northern parts of the Inner Hebrides); a ghost or an evil spirit (Islay, Jura and Colonsay)

The Irish cognate (mana in reformed spelling) has undergone an interesting evolution from "omen, portent" through "attitude, outlook" to "motto, slogan".
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-09-23, 4:07

(fr) farfelu - hare-brained, ridiculous, eccentric

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-24, 16:41

(de-AT) Stanitzel cone, esp. a paper cone used for carrying items
(de) strampeln struggle, thrash
(fr) suie soot
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2018-09-25, 19:12

(fr) clope cigarette (slang)
(fr) thune money, dough (slang) (e.g. avoir de la thune)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-27, 17:40

(cy) dortur dormitory [of a monastery]
(cy) ffreutur friary, refectory [of a monastery]
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-09-28, 14:18

beech
bramble
to true up

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-28, 14:26

IpseDixit wrote:to true up

New to me, too, but then I don't cycle.

(fr) blondinet fair-haired boy
(es) cazo saucepot
(ga) formad envy
(cy) penlinio kneel
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-09-28, 14:44

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:to true up

New to me, too, but then I don't cycle.


I haven't found it in the context of cycling though.

<<It was such an easy matter to him to make a silvery light shine in a dark room, or find a lost pin by thinking about it, or true up a warped joint by running his hands over the wood and talking to it [...]>>

linguoboy wrote:(es) cazo saucepot


Interesting, in Ladin ciaz means "dipper".

IpseDixit

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-09-28, 17:46

reed bed
teal
tinsel
bulwark
to ensconse
(to) bungle
to hark back (to something)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-02, 13:53

Me: I really need to make more substantial progress with Japanese

Also me: Let me fritter away my morning study time learning superfluous anime terms

(ja) スーパーロボット - super robot
(ja) 本部 (ほんぶ ) - headquarters, command central
(ja) ええええ - emotional onomatopoeia, or 擬情語 (ぎじょうご), indicating realization, understanding or surprise


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