Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Osias » 2017-08-20, 22:06

Interesting.

We have the expression "o cérebro ainda não pegou no tranco".
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-21, 0:03

(es-ve) cotufas popcorn

My Ecuadorian friend said he thought this word originated in Catalan but I did a little research and found that it's apparently limited to a few Balearic dialects (cf. Eivissenc catufes) and the Standard Catalan equivalent is crispetes. It's more widespread in the Spanish of the Canary Islands, so it probably either originated there or in Venezuela.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-08-22, 1:30

(fr)
à sa décharge - in his/her defense
garçon manqué m - tomboy
exciser v - excise; perform female genital mutilation
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-23, 15:27

(fr) faire la manche panhandle, go begging
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2017-08-23, 17:48

(es) salpicadero dashboard ((pt) tabliê)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-08-24, 5:21

Luís wrote:((pt) tabliê)

Is that a colloquial word? Or is it used only in Portugal? I couldn't find that on WordReference but only painel de controle, and I also couldn't find it on Wiktionary. Of course Wiktionary just says that painel de controle means control panel, and not specifically a car's dashboard. (I know just because WR and Wiktionary don't have the word does that mean the word is colloquial or slang or something.)


(pt) cobrar to charge (money)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2017-08-24, 7:49

dEhiN wrote:Is that a colloquial word? Or is it used only in Portugal? I couldn't find that on WordReference but only painel de controle, and I also couldn't find it on Wiktionary. Of course Wiktionary just says that painel de controle means control panel, and not specifically a car's dashboard. (I know just because WR and Wiktionary don't have the word does that mean the word is colloquial or slang or something.)


No, it's a proper word.
Many times the original spelling is used (tablier). AFAIK it's specific to Portugal.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2017-08-26, 19:49

(fr) érable maple ((pt) ácer)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Ser » 2017-08-27, 15:15

English tetchy ("bad-tempered, irritable").

English dehiscent. Heard it as "a dehiscent seed", i.e. a seed that's opening up to become a growing sprout, i.e. undergoing dehiscence.

French stage 'period in which a student who just graduated, or a student about to graduate, has some work experience'. It's close to North American English "internship" but it doesn't quite mean the same thing. I heard it in the context of Canadian students of French immersion teaching about to graduate, as they do a 4-month stage, as is typical of teachers' training. Talking about a stage after graduating is apparently more commonly said of lawyers.

Mandarin 行星 xing2xing1 'planet', which, annoyingly, sounds almost exactly the same as 星星 xing1xing1 'star'.

Mandarin 以及 yi3ji2 'and'. I thought there were only five ways of saying "and" in Mandarin to link two nouns, namely 和 he2, 跟 gen1, 同 tong2, 与 yu3 and 及 ji2, but I just read there's really six. I find it interesting that each of the six words is slightly different: 和 he2 is the most common one (used in any register), 跟 gen1 is colloquial and typical of northerners, 同 is colloquial and typical of southerners, 与 yu3 is formal, 及 ji2 is formal and implies the second thing is less important or prominent, 以及 yi3ji2 is like 及 ji2 but less common.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby JackFrost » 2017-08-27, 16:32

(fr)
argent liquide - cash
compte courant - chequing account

Never knew they'd say those differently. Here, we say argent comptant/cash and compte-chèques respectively. :?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-27, 16:46

Serafín wrote:French stage 'period in which a student who just graduated, or a student about to graduate, has some work experience'. It's close to North American English "internship" but it doesn't quite mean the same thing. I heard it in the context of Canadian students of French immersion teaching about to graduate, as they do a 4-month stage, as is typical of teachers' training. Talking about a stage after graduating is apparently more commonly said of lawyers.

In American English, I've heard this pronounced in two syllables (and sometimes even spelled accordingly, i.e. "stagé") specifically in the context of a kitchen stage, i.e. an unpaid internship with a chef in order to learn particular techniques on the job.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Kenny » 2017-08-27, 18:56

linguoboy wrote:
Serafín wrote:French stage 'period in which a student who just graduated, or a student about to graduate, has some work experience'. It's close to North American English "internship" but it doesn't quite mean the same thing. I heard it in the context of Canadian students of French immersion teaching about to graduate, as they do a 4-month stage, as is typical of teachers' training. Talking about a stage after graduating is apparently more commonly said of lawyers.

In American English, I've heard this pronounced in two syllables (and sometimes even spelled accordingly, i.e. "stagé") specifically in the context of a kitchen stage, i.e. an unpaid internship with a chef in order to learn particular techniques on the job.

I think the meaning of stage in French extends even beyond that: it can also be used to refer to courses, as in "stage d'été" or "stage linguistique".

@Jack:
I think compte chèque also exists in European French, but it might be less common (there is also DAV - dépôt à vue).
Cash and argent comptant, too. Although technically, as far as I know, argent comptant isn't really cash in the sense of physical money (as opposed to a credit or debit card), but cash as in the whole amount being paid upfront instead of by installments/on credit.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-28, 1:23

(it) weekend fuori porta weekend getaway
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-08-28, 22:21

Kenny wrote:I think the meaning of stage in French extends even beyond that: it can also be used to refer to courses, as in "stage d'été" or "stage linguistique".

Yes, stage in France French (at least) also refers to any sort of training course and if I remember correctly can be used even of college programs.

Cash and argent comptant, too..

I didn't know cash was used in France French. Is it slang? I've definitely heard argent liquide before, but not sure if I've ever come across cash.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Car » 2017-08-29, 19:20

dEhiN wrote:
Cash and argent comptant, too..

I didn't know cash was used in France French. Is it slang? I've definitely heard argent liquide before, but not sure if I've ever come across cash.

We were taught that while cash is used, you shouldn't use it, so I guess it is.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-30, 14:25

(fr) réverbère streetlight
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Car » 2017-08-30, 19:53

linguoboy wrote:(fr) réverbère streetlight

Funny you post it today, I also learnt it the other day.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-30, 19:58

Car wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(fr) réverbère streetlight

Funny you post it today, I also learnt it the other day.

I learned it last week but wasn't sure I'd remember it. Then today it popped up in my reading (En finir avec Eddy Bellegueule) and I was like, "I know what that means!"
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-09-03, 4:53

You'll also find it in Le Petit Prince, should that ever turn up on your reading list. :)
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2017-09-03, 9:12

(es) huella footprint ((pt) pegada)

This is a rather common word, but I had never really come across it until now... :hmm:
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