Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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Serafín
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Serafín » 2017-09-03, 13:43

Luís wrote:(es) huella footprint ((pt) pegada)

This is a rather common word, but I had never really come across it until now... :hmm:

Maybe it's because in Spanish we often use el rastro ‘trail (of an animal), footprints’ or la pista ‘track’ instead of using plural las huellas. Buscamos al venado siguiendo el rastro que dejó en la arena ("We looked for the deer following the footprints it left on the sand"). Le seguí la pista al venado por varias horas ("I kept track of the deer for some hours"). Using plural las huellas is fine though, but I'm saying it often sounds just as idiomatic to say el rastro or la pista instead.

huella can also mean "fingerprint" by the way.

This is how I also felt regarding English "wag" (as in look at the dog, it's wagging its tail). Similarly for some other Germanic verbs like wriggle, wring [a rag] and tug.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Car » 2017-09-03, 14:14

Dormouse559 wrote:You'll also find it in Le Petit Prince, should that ever turn up on your reading list. :)

That's where I learnt it, actually.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-09-03, 17:12

(es) una bruja witch

(pt) um rim kidney
(pt) entrosar to fall in with; 'to gear' or 'to mesh' (for a set of gears)

(ta) கூட்டம் /kuːʈːəm/ crowd
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2017-09-04, 8:31

(en_old) cneordlǣċan to be diligent, study
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-04, 8:33

dEhiN wrote:(ta) கூட்டம் /kuːʈːəm/ crowd

This can also mean 'group'. Both meanings exist in Malayalam as well.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-09-04, 15:23

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:(ta) கூட்டம் /kuːʈːəm/ crowd

This can also mean 'group'. Both meanings exist in Malayalam as well.

நன்றி. But I think I wrote that wrong. I just looked up my Anki deck and I have கூட்டம் as gathering, and பட்டாலம் as crowd? I used to think பட்டாலம் meant group because I only knew it from context: my family would always refer to extended family get-togethers as 'the whole pattalam'. But then a friend told me it meant crowd and கூட்டம் meant gathering. Though maybe they are used interchangeably and both also can mean group? Or do you know if there's a difference between them?
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-04, 15:37

Wait, wut? Tamil has the word பட்டாலம்?? :shock:

Oh wtf, it also has பட்டாம், and apparently, both words can refer to the military. :?

This is extra-weird to me because Malayalam only has பட்டாளம், and it means 'army' and is a Portuguese loanword from batelão...ohh, and I just realized I always got batelão '(nautical) barge, lighter, hoy' mixed up with batalhão 'battalion, swarm, crowd'! :shock: Wait, so then which one does it come from? :? Well, anyway, the point is, it's a Portuguese loanword that has to do with the military, and it looks like it can refer to the military in Tamil, too, but the meaning has been more generalized (in Tamil), I guess kind of like how you can talk about a group of people metaphorically as "troops" or whatever in English (as in "rally the troops").

EDIT: Oh, apparently, it comes from batalhão. Huh, okay.

EDIT2: Sorry for all these jumbled thoughts! :lol:
EDIT3: And yes, I'm pretty sure கூட்டம் can also mean 'crowd' in Tamil (this is the only meaning listed in the Tamil Wiktionary, for instance).

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-09-04, 16:51

vijayjohn wrote:Wait, wut? Tamil has the word பட்டாலம்?? :shock:

Oh wtf, it also has பட்டாம், and apparently, both words can refer to the military. :?

This is extra-weird to me because Malayalam only has பட்டாளம், and it means 'army' and is a Portuguese loanword from batelão...ohh, and I just realized I always got batelão '(nautical) barge, lighter, hoy' mixed up with batalhão 'battalion, swarm, crowd'! :shock: Wait, so then which one does it come from? :? Well, anyway, the point is, it's a Portuguese loanword that has to do with the military, and it looks like it can refer to the military in Tamil, too, but the meaning has been more generalized (in Tamil), I guess kind of like how you can talk about a group of people metaphorically as "troops" or whatever in English (as in "rally the troops").

EDIT: Oh, apparently, it comes from batalhão. Huh, okay.

EDIT2: Sorry for all these jumbled thoughts! :lol:
EDIT3: And yes, I'm pretty sure கூட்டம் can also mean 'crowd' in Tamil (this is the only meaning listed in the Tamil Wiktionary, for instance).

No worries about the jumbled thoughts! I didn't realize Tamil has pattalam with small l and big l. Now I'm not sure which one my family usually uses when referring to the extended family gatherings. According to Tamildict.com, பட்டாலம் means military while பட்டாளம் means brigade. Also that same site has a whole bunch of meanings for கூட்டம் including crowd. So maybe my friend just told me one common meaning for each word, or even a colloquial meaning? She's Lankan Tamil so perhaps this is how Lankans or at least her family uses these words?

Well this Friday I start my Tamil lessons, so I can ask my teacher. I'll also ask my parents and see what they say.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-04, 19:28

dEhiN wrote:According to Tamildict.com, பட்டாலம் means military while பட்டாளம் means brigade.

In which case I think they're probably just slightly different words for the same thing. :lol:

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-09-07, 18:42

(fr) cabas shopping basket
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-09-08, 2:07

(fr)
sempiternel adj - (pejorative) unending, constant
hécatombe f - hecatomb, great sacrifice; bloodbath; mass destruction

From looking up sempiternel, I learned English "sempiternal", but I don't know if it has the same negative connotation.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Aurinĭa » 2017-09-08, 10:37

linguoboy wrote:(fr) cabas shopping basket

Huh, interesting. There's a word /kɑ'bɑ/ in the local dialect here, but it means (shopping) bag, not basket.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-09-09, 10:38

(en) Coton de Tulear

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Antea » 2017-09-09, 11:03

IpseDixit wrote:(en) Coton de Tulear


I have also looked it up in Wikipedia and it's sooo cute

Image

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-09-09, 12:31

Antea wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:(en) Coton de Tulear


I have also looked it up in Wikipedia and it's sooo cute

Image


It is, indeed.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-09-09, 18:00

Belgian French (fr-be) couque f - brioche, general word for pastries; (holiday) cookie
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2017-09-09, 23:16

(it) snello slim, slender
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Serafín » 2017-09-10, 18:37

This amazing abbreviation of four sayings in abbreviated language. A meta-abbreviation, if you will!

Image

喜大普奔

EDIT: I have now been informed that this term is mostly used to celebrate someone else's loss nowadays...

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-09-17, 19:45

(fr) plume f - writer, speechwriter

I found this usage of the word (whose most basic meanings are "feather" and "quill") in this article, which quotes a woman who was "l'une des plumes de Bill Clinton" (one of Bill Clinton's speechwriters).
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2017-09-20, 19:59

(it)
ruffiano tattle-tale, snitch
ristorazione veloce fast food
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”


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