Cognates

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Homine.Sardu
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Re: Cognates

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-08-16, 13:48

(it) mandria (herd of animals)
(sc) mandra (animal pen)

from Latin and Greek "mandra" (herd or animal pen)

P.S.

From the noun "mandra" the Latin-speaking Sardinians coined the verb "In Mandrare", in actual Sardinian "Immandrare or Ismandrare" (to close in). From the same root there is also the adjective "Mandrone" (lazy, lazybones). Literally the adjective "Mandrone" could be translated as "someone who spends his time locked up" (doing nothing); with centuries this adjective has become a synonymous of "lazy, lazybones".
Last edited by Homine.Sardu on 2018-08-22, 7:59, edited 2 times in total.

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linguoboy
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Re: Cognates

Postby linguoboy » 2018-08-21, 20:49

Two words I'm surprised to find are not cognates: quail (n.) and quail (v.).

I'd always assumed the verb was derived from the noun (i.e. "acting in a way similar to a small skittish game bird") but they're from entirely distinct sources. The noun is an onomatopoeia coloured by the PIE root for "quail" and thus related to German Wachtel, Ancient Greek ὄρτυξ, etc. The verb, on the other hand, is from PGmc *kwelaną "suffer" and, thus, is cognate to German quälen "torture", Swedish kvälja "arraign", etc.
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linguoboy
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Re: Cognates

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-17, 16:20

Here's an unexpected pair: Catalan ble "wick" and Welsh blaidd "wolf".

Supposedly the connexion is the white mullein (Verbascum lychnitis, a plant whose leaves could be made into candle wicks and which also goes under the name of "wolf's tail". (Cf. Spanish gordolobo "mullein", which is considered a corruption of Andalusian codalupo < VL cauda(m) lupi.)
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Re: Cognates

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-09-18, 0:06

Telugu has borrowed so many words from Hindi/Urdu it's even ended up borrowing [z] from it (and the whole [z] ~ [d͡ʒ] alternation).

Persian (fa) روز roz - day
Urdu (ur) روز roz/roj - day
Telugu (te) రోజు rōzu/rōju - day

IpseDixit

Re: Cognates

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-11-20, 1:29

The word for "today" in many languages of northern Italy comes from Latin hanc horam (this hour). (e.g: Venetian: ancò, Ladin: anché, Ligurian: ancheu, Piedmontese: ancheuj).

From hanc horam Italian got ancora (still/yet) and according to some sources, from ancora we got anche (also), although I kind of struggle to see the logic that got us from "still" to "also".

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Re: Cognates

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-11-20, 1:36

Can't ancora and anche both mean 'even'?

IpseDixit

Re: Cognates

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-11-20, 1:42

vijayjohn wrote:Can't ancora and anche both mean 'even'?


Nope.

"Even" would be persino/perfino or addirittura.

IpseDixit

Re: Cognates

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-11-20, 21:28

IpseDixit wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Can't ancora and anche both mean 'even'?


Nope.

"Even" would be persino/perfino or addirittura.


It just dawned on me that yeah, there is (at least) one instance where "even" is translated as ancora, namely: even more---> ancora di più. I can't really think of other ones though.

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Re: Cognates

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-11-21, 4:24

The Wiktionary entry for ancora (in English) says:

5. even
Ancor(a) meglio che sia così!
It's even better if it is so!
Synonyms: addirittura, anche, perfino, persino, pure, finanche

EDIT: Well, okay, I guess that's basically what you were saying.

But still...is it still hard to see how ancora and anche might be semantically related?


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