The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-11, 3:17

dEhiN wrote:
Michael wrote:to wax to grow, increase

Isn't that the meaning in the phrase to wax and wane, basically to increase and decrease, to grow and lessen?

Yes.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Olinguito » 2017-07-11, 14:03

Bassaricyon neblina

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Michael » 2017-07-13, 18:52

[flag=]en[/flag] an adder a snake, a serpent (←"a nadder", from earlier sēo nǣd[d]r/e, pl.: þā -an)
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-07-13, 19:19

Michael wrote:[flag=]en[/flag] an adder a snake, a serpent (←"a nadder", from earlier sēo nǣd[d]r/e, pl.: þā -an)

Adder for a snake in general is archaic. In modern usage, this term is applied to certain small vipers (esp. the common adder) and other species resembling them.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-07-14, 12:41

[flag=]en[/flag] shibboleth
1. A word, especially seen as a test, to distinguish someone as belonging to a particular nation, class, profession etc.
2. A common or longstanding belief, custom, or catchphrase associated with a particular group, especially one with little current meaning or truth.


(Taken from Wikipedia).

I've seen this word a few times in the past, but never knew what it meant. Dormouse recently used it here when responding to me and that forced me to look it up.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Olinguito » 2017-07-14, 15:29

dEhiN wrote:[flag=]en[/flag] shibboleth
1. A word, especially seen as a test, to distinguish someone as belonging to a particular nation, class, profession etc.
2. A common or longstanding belief, custom, or catchphrase associated with a particular group, especially one with little current meaning or truth.


(Taken from Wikipedia).

You mean Wiktionary. :wink: I first came across it in the King James Version of the Bible (Judges 12:6). The people of Gilead were at war with the people of Ephraim. The latter spoke a language that did not contain the phoneme /ʃ/; hence they could not pronounce the word shibboleth correctly. This was the method by which the Gileadites recognized their enemies.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-07-14, 15:34

I think I first learned about "shibboleths" in the context of the Northern Ireland conflict. Militants would make you recite the alphabet and listen closely to how you pronounced the eighth letter.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-14, 17:08

I'm not sure when I first learned what a shibboleth was. I think it might even have been as late as my first year of grad school, when I had to know what it was because I was a teaching assistant for Intro to Linguistics.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-07-18, 16:13

[flag=]en-us[/flag] zerk a grease nipple
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-07-27, 2:31

I figured I'd learn some new vocabulary following the Obamacare repeal bill, but I wasn't expecting this:

[flag=]en-us[/flag] to snatch a knot in someone's ass - to hit someone as punishment

(context)

As far as dialect distribution, I'll say Southern U.S., being the representative who used the phrase is from Georgia. I can't get more specific than that, though.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-07-27, 2:41

[flag=]en[/flag] wherry a type of small boat
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby razlem » 2017-07-27, 23:51

[flag=]eng-us[/flag] riparian - relating to or situated on the banks of a river
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-07-30, 22:29

tulle a kind of mesh-like fabric

critter derogatory name for "gender-critical" feminists, a euphemism for TERFs
linguoboy wrote:I think I first learned about "shibboleths" in the context of the Northern Ireland conflict. Militants would make you recite the alphabet and listen closely to how you pronounced the eighth letter.
Since my grandmother was Irish, my father always pronounced it with /h/ and when I asked him about this as a kid, he told me it was used in his youth to tell apart Catholics and Protestants among Irish-Canadians. (He grew up in an era where it was frowned upon to even date or have friends outside of your denomination.) So that was also how I learned about the concept of a shibboleth, long before I found out what the name for it was.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-31, 5:34

mōdgethanc wrote:Since my grandmother was Irish, my father always pronounced it with /h/ and when I asked him about this as a kid, he told me it was used in his youth to tell apart Catholics and Protestants among Irish-Canadians.

So Protestant Irish Canadians didn't pronounce it with an /h/ and Catholic ones did?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-07-31, 6:02

vijayjohn wrote:So Protestant Irish Canadians didn't pronounce it with an /h/ and Catholic ones did?
[h]I think so. You would have to [h]ask the [h]Irish though.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby OldBoring » 2017-07-31, 9:05

Well, maybe they thought it was more logical to pronounce the letter h with actually the [h] sound in it.
But Latin letter names come from Latin, and IIRC the Latin name for H doesn't have the [h] sound.

In Pinyin, officially the name of the letter h is [ha]. But in practice nobody ever uses those "letter names", but instead they use the English names of the letters.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-07-31, 15:10

OldBoring wrote:Well, maybe they thought it was more logical to pronounce the letter h with actually the [h] sound in it.

Next thing I know you'll be expecting us to say the name of 'q' with a [q]!

[flag=]en-us[/flag] cafone a boorish Italian-American
[flag=]en[/flag] anankastic compulsory; compulsive
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Olinguito » 2017-08-02, 15:54

scurf
(n)
1. another word for dandruff
2. flaky or scaly matter adhering to or peeling off a surface

Nevertheless I have no idea what is meant by the following sentence. :noclue:
A scurf of books and china ornaments awaited him.
—E. M. Forster, Howards End, Chapter 30
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-08-02, 16:57

Maybe a "crust" or "layer" of books and china ornaments?

[flag=]en[/flag] to serpentine - to move like a snake

I already knew the adjective and noun senses, but I didn't know it could be a verb. I learned this from, of all things, a pop song, Selena Gomez's "Bad Liar".
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-08-03, 4:49

linguoboy wrote:[flag=]en[/flag] anankastic compulsory; compulsive
Is this a Britishism? I've never encountered it except in "anankastic personality disorder", a rarely used synonym for "obsessive-compulsive personality disorder" (a confusingly named condition which is not the same as OCD).


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