Page 59 of 63

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2018-11-19, 17:08
by linguoboy
(en-IE) naggin a pint bottle of liquor

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2018-11-27, 12:00
by mōdgethanc
blackbag

To break in to a place without authorization as part of a clandestine operation.
To kidnap in order to make someone disappear (as opposed to kidnapping for ransom).


I knew the first definition as in the phrase "black bag operation", but not the second.

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2018-11-29, 7:34
by mōdgethanc
thanatoptic of a consideration of death; seems to have originated with this poem

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2018-11-29, 15:34
by linguoboy
meconium

Posted: 2018-12-06, 19:14
by Olinguito
limn
(v)
to represent in drawing or painting

For a second Katherine saw the tiers of the distant conurbation limned in fire, and then it was gone.
—Philip Reeve, Mortal Engines, Chapter 23

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2018-12-22, 17:40
by mōdgethanc
roneotype an amateur printing method using organic solvents, similar to a mimeograph (which uses ink)

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-01, 8:51
by md0
(el-cy) γυναικ·αρφή / (el) γυναικ·αδελφή [wife-sister]: sister-in-law (contemporary (el-cy)/(el) κουνιάδα < Venet. cognado)
The word is preserved in the vocabulary of Cypriot Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots, but until today I thought it was a calque from Turkish because I've never heard it from Greek Cypriots, even very old people. It's a Medieval Greek coinage and it seems to have fallen out of mainstream use in the early 1900s.
It's a full paradigm: wife-sister/wife-brother/husband-sister/husband-brother. The cognado-based vocabulary doesn't make it obvious if it's the wife's or the husband's side of the family.

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-08, 15:40
by linguoboy
(en) caecotrophy
(en-us) Jell-O Belt (a.k.a. the Mormon Corridor)

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-08, 16:08
by mōdgethanc
linguoboy wrote:(en) caecotrophy
The reaction of the rest of my class as the professor calmly explained why some animals eat their own shit was priceless.

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-09, 17:07
by mōdgethanc
hygrothermograph instrument that measures both humidity and temperature

cordycepted behaving like ants who have been infected with spores of the cordiceps fungus; a term used by the far right along the lines of "NPC", "cuck" and "sheeple"

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-10, 4:17
by Dormouse559
(en) scrummy - delicious

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-12, 20:17
by OldBoring
md0 wrote:(el-cy) γυναικ·αρφή / (el) γυναικ·αδελφή [wife-sister]: sister-in-law (contemporary (el-cy)/(el) κουνιάδα < Venet. cognado)
The word is preserved in the vocabulary of Cypriot Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots, but until today I thought it was a calque from Turkish because I've never heard it from Greek Cypriots, even very old people. It's a Medieval Greek coinage and it seems to have fallen out of mainstream use in the early 1900s.
It's a full paradigm: wife-sister/wife-brother/husband-sister/husband-brother. The cognado-based vocabulary doesn't make it obvious if it's the wife's or the husband's side of the family.

What? There are Cypriot-Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots?
Are there also Cypriot-Turkish-speaking Greek Cypriots?

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-12, 21:43
by md0
OldBoring wrote:
md0 wrote:(el-cy) γυναικ·αρφή / (el) γυναικ·αδελφή [wife-sister]: sister-in-law (contemporary (el-cy)/(el) κουνιάδα < Venet. cognado)
The word is preserved in the vocabulary of Cypriot Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots, but until today I thought it was a calque from Turkish because I've never heard it from Greek Cypriots, even very old people. It's a Medieval Greek coinage and it seems to have fallen out of mainstream use in the early 1900s.
It's a full paradigm: wife-sister/wife-brother/husband-sister/husband-brother. The cognado-based vocabulary doesn't make it obvious if it's the wife's or the husband's side of the family.

What? There are Cypriot-Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots?
Are there also Cypriot-Turkish-speaking Greek Cypriots?

Cypriot Greek has been the lingua franca for a long time, so Turkish Cypriots born before the war were either bilingual, or monolingual speakers of Cypriot Greek (some elderly Turkish Cypriots still do not speak Turkish at all).

The opposite was very rare, because there was little social benefit in learning Turkish then, and there still isn't (other than symbolic capital among some activist circles).

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-13, 6:57
by langmon
Deutsch: Klaumeister.
(This was among the last new words I learned, even if it happened a long time ago.)

It means master of theft.
"Klauen" is a colloquial term for stealing something. And that one wasn't new to me at all, because (almost) everyone within the German sprachraum knows it anyway. But on the other hand, the combination of "klauen" and "Meister" is rather new to me.

Bob der Baumeister = Bob the Builder ("Bob the master of building")
And Bob der Klaumeister is his brother.

I haven't seen him a single time outside of the German sprachraum. And even there, he only appeared, as far as I know, in a single Youtube video. That one either belongs to the Kinderkanal ("children's channel"), or it is a fake Kinderkanal style video. Not too easy to figure out.

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-21, 19:14
by OldBoring
md0 wrote:
OldBoring wrote:
md0 wrote:(el-cy) γυναικ·αρφή / (el) γυναικ·αδελφή [wife-sister]: sister-in-law (contemporary (el-cy)/(el) κουνιάδα < Venet. cognado)
The word is preserved in the vocabulary of Cypriot Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots, but until today I thought it was a calque from Turkish because I've never heard it from Greek Cypriots, even very old people. It's a Medieval Greek coinage and it seems to have fallen out of mainstream use in the early 1900s.
It's a full paradigm: wife-sister/wife-brother/husband-sister/husband-brother. The cognado-based vocabulary doesn't make it obvious if it's the wife's or the husband's side of the family.

What? There are Cypriot-Greek-speaking Turkish Cypriots?
Are there also Cypriot-Turkish-speaking Greek Cypriots?

Cypriot Greek has been the lingua franca for a long time, so Turkish Cypriots born before the war were either bilingual, or monolingual speakers of Cypriot Greek (some elderly Turkish Cypriots still do not speak Turkish at all).

The opposite was very rare, because there was little social benefit in learning Turkish then, and there still isn't (other than symbolic capital among some activist circles).

But if those Turkish Cypriots were native speakers of Cypriot Greek, how did their language evolve differently from the Cypriot Greek? Did they like speak it only with other Turks, but not have contacts with Greeks?

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-21, 20:31
by md0
Oh, since 1963 and until 2003 the two ethnic groups lived separately. From 1963 since 1974 Turkish Cypriots lived in dispersed small enclaves, and from 1974 they were displaced in an ethnically homogeneous contagious area (Northern Cyprus). Since 2003 there is free movement, but not a lot of mixing between ethnic groups. (But transmission of Turkish Cypriot Greek probably ended in the 70s, no new native speakers).

But the work of Elena Ioannidou though, this seems to be partially the case too, for those Turkish Cypriot villages that never had Turkish speakers
Did they like speak it only with other Turks, but not have contacts with Greeks?

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-24, 16:08
by linguoboy
(en) yomp

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-28, 18:52
by linguoboy
(en) sarouel/sirwal shalwar, harem pants

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-29, 1:43
by mōdgethanc
chonk an adorably chubby pet, usually a cat

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Posted: 2019-01-29, 16:51
by mōdgethanc
dremel a small handheld rotary saw

accretive financial jargon for "thing that makes money"