The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

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Linguaphile
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-07-12, 23:10

linguoboy wrote:(en-us) gullywasher toad-strangler [a sudden intense downpour]

(en-us) toad-strangler gullywasher [a sudden intense downpour]

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-07-13, 1:17

I know deluge is said to be a flood but I think in the vernacular I've heard it used like sudden rain or as a downpour of rain

Those other terms, I haven't heard before though :)
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby OldBoring » 2020-07-14, 19:44

(it) scontrino parlante

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linguoboy
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-07-14, 20:22

Linguaphile wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(en-us) gullywasher toad-strangler [a sudden intense downpour]

(en-us) toad-strangler gullywasher [a sudden intense downpour]

:D

Apparently, southern Africa has a such a huge problem with hired security going rogue at nightclubs and concerts that "bouncer" has become almost synonymous with "hired thug". (I came across this in a description of the Mutare slum Sakubva which seemed to be using "bouncer" with the meaning of "gangster".)
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-07-15, 17:48

(no) slagbenk foldout bench
(en) (UK) cleg another term for a horsefly, Tabanus sulcifrons
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-07-17, 17:27

(no) peis (sport) pace
(en) hallux (anat.) big toe
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-07-17, 18:13

crema - Yes, cream, but I just learned this is also an alternative way of calling the diaeresis.

According to the RAE dictionary, it does come from the same Greek word as French tréma, but it may have gotten mixed up with crema (meaning cream this time) for some reason.
If that is indeed the case, I'd love to know what freaking reason it was! :para:

Not that I don't like it, mind you. :D
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-07-17, 19:55

Brzeczyszczykiewicz wrote:According to the RAE dictionary, it does come from the same Greek word as French tréma, but it may have gotten mixed up with crema (meaning cream this time) for some reason.
If that is indeed the case, I'd love to know what freaking reason it was!

Because cream always floats to the top?
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby OldBoring » 2020-07-18, 14:09

That reminds me that toasted edible seeds are called bruscolini in Rome, but I never thought of their meaning.
Then I learned that the Standard Italian term is brustolini with a 't', and it became clear. Compare abbrustolire - "to toast".

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-07-18, 16:00

Is there maybe a tendency, at least in Romance languages, to sometimes change /t/ to /k/? French did it with craindre "to fear", which is from Latin tremo.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-07-18, 16:04

OldBoring wrote:That reminds me that toasted edible seeds are called bruscolini in Rome, but I never thought of their meaning.
Then I learned that the Standard Italian term is brustolini with a 't', and it became clear. Compare abbrustolire - "to toast".

Which in turn reminds me of the pasta dish called "mostaccioli" in Standard Italian and most varieties of English but which is popularly known in my hometown as "muscaccioli" (with /ʌ/). (I don't know if there's any contamination from "musk", but I doubt it.)
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby razlem » 2020-07-19, 7:40

(en-us)
sangfroid
/sɑŋˈfɹɑ/
n. composure or coolness, sometimes excessive, as shown in danger or under trying circumstances.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-07-19, 13:33

(en) autotype a photographic printing process for monochrome reproduction
(no) pukk a crushed stone
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby OldBoring » 2020-07-19, 14:41

linguoboy wrote:
OldBoring wrote:That reminds me that toasted edible seeds are called bruscolini in Rome, but I never thought of their meaning.
Then I learned that the Standard Italian term is brustolini with a 't', and it became clear. Compare abbrustolire - "to toast".

Which in turn reminds me of the pasta dish called "mostaccioli" in Standard Italian and most varieties of English but which is popularly known in my hometown as "muscaccioli" (with /ʌ/). (I don't know if there's any contamination from "musk", but I doubt it.)

Now that's just (Italian) Americans bastardizing Italian words. :twisted:
I think it's mustaccioli with /mu-/ in Neapolitan.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-08-04, 19:42

curve to reject someone's amourous advances; to turn/shoot someone down
sunbreak a break in the clouds allowing sunlight to come through
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