The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2018-03-23, 21:25

(en) elytra the hardened forewings of beetles
(en) sharn cow dung
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2018-03-27, 21:31

(en) pillion a pad behind a saddle to accommodate a second rider
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-03-27, 21:46

(en) preternatural

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-04-07, 0:55

N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ashucky » 2018-04-07, 16:42

Dormouse559 wrote:(en) mackerel sky

Oh, so that's the term in English. In Slovene such clouds are called "little sheep (in the sky)" :mrgreen:
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-04-08, 5:13

Ashucky wrote:Oh, so that's the term in English. In Slovene such clouds are called "little sheep (in the sky)" :mrgreen:

Yeah, it had never occurred to me that it might have a name, but someone used the phrase in passing on the radio, and I was very confused until I pulled up Google.

The Slovenian expression reminds me of the French one — "ciel moutonné" or "fleecy sky", where "moutonné" is derived from the word for "sheep".
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Car » 2018-04-08, 7:35

Dormouse559 wrote:
Ashucky wrote:Oh, so that's the term in English. In Slovene such clouds are called "little sheep (in the sky)" :mrgreen:

Yeah, it had never occurred to me that it might have a name, but someone used the phrase in passing on the radio, and I was very confused until I pulled up Google.

The Slovenian expression reminds me of the French one — "ciel moutonné" or "fleecy sky", where "moutonné" is derived from the word for "sheep".

In German, they're called "Schäfchenwolken" ("little sheep clouds"), as the article also mentions.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ashucky » 2018-04-09, 22:01

Car wrote:In German, they're called "Schäfchenwolken" ("little sheep clouds"), as the article also mentions.

Which is probably where Slovene stole its word from (but Slovene just loves stealing words from German) :P
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-04-11, 8:37

Wikipedia wrote:and in Italy the clouds are known as a pecorelle (little sheep).


This is confusing to say the least. First of all, we would call those clouds pecorelle, a pecorelle means "little sheep-like" and you can't use it as a noun on its own, you'd have to say nuvole a pecorelle "little sheep-like clouds", but most importantly, nobody calls them that way, maybe only in baby talk.

Like other languages, we do have the phrase cielo a pecorelle though (with cielo meaning "sky", for the few who never studied a Romance language), meaning "mackerel sky".

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby pittmirg » 2018-04-18, 18:42

(pl) emablować to court
занесіть мя в Верховину / де родився, хай загину

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2018-04-21, 9:52

(e-US) passel - parcel

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2018-04-21, 18:57

Ciarán12 wrote:(e-US) passel - parcel

Do these really mean the same thing? "Passel" in my dialect is a synonym for "lots" (e.g. "a passel of things to do") whereas the word for "something wrapped to be sent by post" is "package".
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2018-04-21, 20:47

linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:(e-US) passel - parcel

Do these really mean the same thing? "Passel" in my dialect is a synonym for "lots" (e.g. "a passel of things to do") whereas the word for "something wrapped to be sent by post" is "package".


I guess I got it wrong, I know that passel is derived from parcel, but I guess it doesn't mean the same thing.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2018-04-21, 21:59

Ciarán12 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:(e-US) passel - parcel

Do these really mean the same thing? "Passel" in my dialect is a synonym for "lots" (e.g. "a passel of things to do") whereas the word for "something wrapped to be sent by post" is "package".

I guess I got it wrong, I know that passel is derived from parcel, but I guess it doesn't mean the same thing.

Nope. Some meanings of parcel are common to both varieties, notably "plot of land". I've also seen parcel used in computing to mean "data shipment", e.g. "Temporary cookies are tiny parcels of data that are installed on your computer's hard drive while you are visiting the website that make it easier for you to use the site."

However, even though Americans "mail packages" instead of "posting parcels", we still call the service that handles these "parcel post".
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2018-04-22, 10:00

linguoboy wrote:Nope. Some meanings of parcel are common to both varieties, notably "plot of land". I've also seen parcel used in computing to mean "data shipment", e.g. "Temporary cookies are tiny parcels of data that are installed on your computer's hard drive while you are visiting the website that make it easier for you to use the site."

However, even though Americans "mail packages" instead of "posting parcels", we still call the service that handles these "parcel post".


For me, the meanings of parcel include:
- package, normally sent through the post, though it sounds vaugely more quaint than "package", it sounds as though it's homemade
- to parcel up, parcel out = to divide up, divvy up
- a parcel can be an amount of something that has been parceled up, so "parcel of land" as in your example above.

Passel for me doesn't mean anything, from what you are saying above it seems to mean "a load of, a large amount of", but are there any uses of it where it can be synonymous with parcel?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-22, 15:44

That's odd; passel doesn't mean anything to me, either. :hmm:

Wiktionary says "(US, informal) An indeterminately large quantity or group."

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2018-04-23, 16:01

Ciarán12 wrote:Passel for me doesn't mean anything, from what you are saying above it seems to mean "a load of, a large amount of", but are there any uses of it where it can be synonymous with parcel?

Technically, that is a synonymous usage, since parcel for "a load of" is present in Shakespeare ("A holy parcel of the fairest dames that ever turn'd their backs to mortal views") and persists in regional UK dialects. But that's the only usage of passel I know of in contemporary American English (and it's striking to me that it's not familiar to vijayjohn because I strongly associate it with a friend of mine from Oklahoma).
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-23, 16:22

Dem Okies talk all funneh. :silly:
(Translation: People from Oklahoma talk really weirdly.)

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2018-04-23, 17:12

linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:Passel for me doesn't mean anything, from what you are saying above it seems to mean "a load of, a large amount of", but are there any uses of it where it can be synonymous with parcel?

Technically, that is a synonymous usage, since parcel for "a load of" is present in Shakespeare ("A holy parcel of the fairest dames that ever turn'd their backs to mortal views") and persists in regional UK dialects.


Interesting. In my dialect (or at least ideolect), it doesn't have any connotation of being a large amount, just an amount. In fact, "a small parcel of land" sounds like a more natural collocation than "a parcel of land" or "a large parcel of land", and certainly more natural than "a whole parcel of land" (which seems to be how passel would mostly be used).

linguoboy wrote:But that's the only usage of passel I know of in contemporary American English (and it's striking to me that it's not familiar to vijayjohn because I strongly associate it with a friend of mine from Oklahoma).

Isn't Vijay from Texas? Or are you just referring to Southern dialects in general?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-23, 17:21

Yeah, I am, but Oklahoma is right next door (though far away from where I live in Austin), so it's not unreasonable to think I might know what it means. :) I also think isoglosses/the distribution of features in the US is just really weird, so you can't necessarily be sure whether someone from a particular area will share a feature that everyone has just a short distance away.


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