True false friends

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linguoboy
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2013-01-29, 18:38

Marah wrote:[flag]es[/flag]estar constipado = to have a cold
[flag]fr[/flag] constipé = constipated
[flag]en[/flag] constipated

Similarly, [flag]ca[/flag] constipat "head cold". But [flag]pt[/flag] constipado agrees with English and French.
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Re: True false friends

Postby MillMaths » 2013-01-29, 22:57

linguoboy wrote:Or threads. There's a strong case there for making individual threads within each language forum, at least for languages like Spanish where the divergences are so numerous.
There is one in the French forum.

viewtopic.php?f=35&t=18548

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Re: True false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2013-01-30, 4:45

In Italian "costipato" is not a common term.
It means mainly "compact, full, many people in little space". This is probably the first meaning of the word.
But according to Treccani it can mean both "to have a cold" and "constipated".

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Re: True false friends

Postby Marah » 2013-01-30, 13:49

[flag]es[/flag] débil = weak
[flag]fr[/flag] débile = stupid (it can also mean weak in some contexts)
Par exemple, l'enfant croit au Père Noël. L'adulte non. L'adulte ne croit pas au Père Noël. Il vote.

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Re: True false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2013-01-30, 14:19

phaed wrote:[flag]la[/flag] succedere — to advance, climb, follow
to (es, en, fr):
[flag]es[/flag] suceder — to happen, occur
[flag]es[/flag] suceso — event
[flag]en[/flag] succeed
[flag]en[/flag] success
[flag]fr[/flag] succès — success


[flag]it[/flag] succedere - to happen, occur
[flag]it[/flag] successo - success

[flag]en[/flag] occur
[flag]it[/flag] occorrere - to need
"Occur" is succedere, riscontrare, ricorrere.

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Re: True false friends

Postby MillMaths » 2013-01-31, 14:36

Another false-friend stumblingblock from my own experiences.

[flag]es[/flag][flag]it[/flag][flag]pt[/flag] casa – house
[flag]twi[/flag] kasa – (n) language; (v) to speak, to talk

When I hear the word "kasa" in the Twi conversations of my Ghana friends, I keep thinking about houses rather than speech and words. :blush:

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Re: True false friends

Postby BlackZ » 2013-01-31, 17:52

There's a false friend that gives me headaches sometimes:

[flag]pt[/flag] vou/vais/vai/vamos/*/vão + [VERB] = Future tense
[flag]ca[/flag] vaig/vas/va/vam/vau/van + [VERB] = Past tense

Sure, I consciously know that. But once in a while, I "automatically" interpret Catalan sentences as if they were in Portuguese...
Native: [flag=]pt-br[/flag]
Learning: [flag=]en-us[/flag] [flag=]fr[/flag] [flag=]ja[/flag] [flag=]es[/flag] [flag=]ca[/flag] [flag=]de[/flag]

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2013-01-31, 21:03

Just tripped myself up over this pair:

[flag]de[/flag] Das stimmt "That's right."
[flag]sv[/flag] Det stimmar "That makes a noise."

(The correct Swedish equivalent is Det stämmer.)
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Re: True false friends

Postby Johanna » 2013-01-31, 21:45

linguoboy wrote:Just tripped myself up over this pair:

[flag]de[/flag] Das stimmt "That's right."
[flag]sv[/flag] Det stimmar "That makes a noise."

(The correct Swedish equivalent is Det stämmer.)

You'd never really hear "det stimmar" though, just "det stämmer" ;)

Actually, "det stimmar" sounds kind of ungrammatical to me...
Swedish (sv) native; English (en) good; Norwegian (no) read fluently, understand well, speak badly; Danish (dk) read fluently, understand badly, can't speak; Faroese (fo) read some, understand a bit, speak a few sentences; German (de) French (fr) Spanish (es) forgetting; heritage language, want to understand and speak but can't.

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Re: True false friends

Postby ILuvEire » 2013-01-31, 21:46

I don't know if this would ever happen to anyone else, but it's totally happened to me (in my German class in high school)

[flag]de[/flag] fort - away
[flag]fr[/flag] fort - strong
[flag]de[/flag] [flag]da[/flag] [flag]fr-qc[/flag] [flag]haw[/flag] [flag]he[/flag] [flag]es[/flag]
Current focus: [flag]ga[/flag] [flag]ar[/flag]
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Re: True false friends

Postby Eginhard » 2013-01-31, 23:45

[flag]ru[/flag] неделя - week
[flag]bg[/flag] неделя - Sunday

I learned it in Russian first, so it's now deeply etched into my mind as "week", but actually in all (I think) other Slavic languages it means Sunday.
Current focus: [flag=]lt[/flag] [flag=]fr[/flag] [flag=]bg[/flag] [flag=]hr[/flag] [flag=]ga[/flag]

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Re: True false friends

Postby phaed » 2013-02-01, 0:23

ILuvEire wrote:I don't know if this would ever happen to anyone else, but it's totally happened to me (in my German class in high school)

[flag]de[/flag] fort - away
[flag]fr[/flag] fort - strong
You're not the only one—I've misunderstood "Er ist fort" as "He is strong" several times before. Always a bit difficult to explain.. :)
Native: [flag=]en-US[/flag]
B2: [flag=]es[/flag] (2006), [flag=]fr[/flag] (2008), [flag=]de[/flag] (2012)
A1: [flag=]ro[/flag] (2013)
Admiring from a distance: [flag=]sco[/flag] [flag=]la[/flag] [flag=]el[/flag] [flag=]fa[/flag] [flag=]no[/flag] [flag=]ru[/flag]

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Re: True false friends

Postby ILuvEire » 2013-02-01, 0:26

phaed wrote:
ILuvEire wrote:I don't know if this would ever happen to anyone else, but it's totally happened to me (in my German class in high school)

[flag]de[/flag] fort - away
[flag]fr[/flag] fort - strong
You're not the only one—I've misunderstood "Er ist fort" as "He is strong" several times before. Always a bit difficult to explain.. :)
My German teacher then was a native French speaker, and when I translated a sentence with the French meaning he burst out laughing and I blushed so hard. It's funny because it was like three years ago and such a minute thing, but I was so embarrassed until I found out what I had actually done wrong :P
[flag]de[/flag] [flag]da[/flag] [flag]fr-qc[/flag] [flag]haw[/flag] [flag]he[/flag] [flag]es[/flag]
Current focus: [flag]ga[/flag] [flag]ar[/flag]
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Re: True false friends

Postby kevin » 2013-02-01, 10:07

Eginhard wrote:[flag]ru[/flag] неделя - week
[flag]bg[/flag] неделя - Sunday

I learned it in Russian first, so it's now deeply etched into my mind as "week", but actually in all (I think) other Slavic languages it means Sunday.

So the Russians don't do anything throughout the whole week instead of just on Sunday? :D

Or was my Czech teacher wrong when she told us that it's indeed derived from nedělat?

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Re: True false friends

Postby TheStrayCat » 2013-02-01, 10:32

kevin wrote:
Eginhard wrote:[flag]ru[/flag] неделя - week
[flag]bg[/flag] неделя - Sunday

I learned it in Russian first, so it's now deeply etched into my mind as "week", but actually in all (I think) other Slavic languages it means Sunday.

So the Russians don't do anything throughout the whole week instead of just on Sunday? :D

Or was my Czech teacher wrong when she told us that it's indeed derived from nedělat?


Wiktionary wrote:Equivalent to не + делая ("no working"), originally used to mean Sunday, the day of rest (Old Church Slavonic недѣлꙗ ("not doing")).


You're right, they just realized it would be unfair to call a single day of the week a "no-working day" instead of the whole week. :D

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Re: True false friends

Postby md0 » 2013-02-04, 23:48

[flag]el[/flag] βαρετός (=boring) /vare'tos/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] βαρετός (=heavy) /vɐɾɛ'tɔs/

[flag]el[/flag] κόλλα (=glue) /'kola/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] κόλλα (=sheet of paper) /ˈkɔlːɐ/

[flag]el[/flag] γόμα (=rubber, pencil eraser, [flag]el-cy[/flag] σβηστήριν) /'ɣoma/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] γόμμα (=glue) /'ɣɔmːɐ/

[flag]el[/flag] ανιψιός (=nephew) /ani'psços/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] ανιψιός (=cousin) /ɐni'pʃɔs/

[flag]el[/flag] ταράσσω (=to disturb) /ta'raso/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] ταράσσω (=to move) /tɐ'ɾɐsːɔ/

[flag]en[/flag] semantics (=σημασιολογία, σημειολογία)
[flag]el[/flag] σημαντικά (=important) /simandiˈka/

[flag]en[/flag] pneumatic (=αεροκίνητος)
[flag]el[/flag] πνευματικός (=spiritual) /pnevmati'kos/

[flag]en[/flag] orgy (=όργιο /'orʝio/)
[flag]el[/flag] οργή (=rage) /or'ʝi/
Last edited by md0 on 2013-02-05, 12:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: True false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2013-02-05, 1:23

Wow, there are quite a lot of false friends between Greek Greek and Cypriot Greek.
meidei wrote:[flag]el[/flag] κόλα (=glue)

Could that be cognate with the Italian colla?

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Re: True false friends

Postby md0 » 2013-02-05, 7:26

Strictly speaking, it comes from the verb κολλώ (to stick together), which is an old verb. I don't know the etymo for the Italian word, but it's possible that they are connected through Latin.

[flag]el[/flag] αυτομολώ (to defect) /afto'molo/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] αυτομολώ (to burn out, to be exhausted) /ɐftɔmɔˈlɔ/

[flag]el[/flag] μακαρίζω (=to call someone lucky) /maka'rizo/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] μακαρίζω (=1. to mourn the dead 2. to kill someone) /mɐkɐˈɾizɔ/


[flag]el[/flag] διασταυρώνω (=to compare/cross-check a statement) /ð{i/ʝ}astaˈvrono/
[flag]el-cy[/flag] διασταυρώνω (=to cross the road) /ðiɐstɐˈvrɔnːɔ/

I can think of more, especially terms related to the bureaucracy, but I'll leave then for another time.
Last edited by md0 on 2013-02-05, 12:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: True false friends

Postby Kenny » 2013-02-05, 11:05

colle [kɔl] nom féminin - étym. cole 1268 ◊ latin populaire °colla, grec kolla


there :)
Meidei, could you provide IPA or SAMPA transcriptions? Don't know my Greek well enough.

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Re: True false friends

Postby md0 » 2013-02-05, 12:22

You are right. I will edit the posts in a minute.
Edit: Done.
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