True false friends

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Ser
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Re: True false friends

Postby Ser » 2018-12-18, 17:30

IpseDixit wrote:
Ser wrote:(es) chato - having a small nose (feminine chata)

Do you know the etymology?

Ultimately the same as Portuguese chato (which also means 'flat') and Italian piatto. The Spanish word is probably a borrowing from either Galician or Portuguese.
Last edited by Ser on 2018-12-18, 17:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: True false friends

Postby Luís » 2018-12-18, 17:36

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) durex - cellophane tape
several other languages: durex - a brand of condoms


Only in Brazil. In Portugal durex is also a brand of condoms (lots of jokes about Brazilians wanting to buy tape here :P )

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) lâmina - blade
(it) lamina - foil ((pt) papel [de metal])


papel de alumínio

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) pipa - kite ((it) aquilone)
(it) pipa - pipe ((pt) cachimbo)


Once again, only in Brazil. In Portugal a kite is a papagaio de papel (lit. paper parrot)

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) de cor - colored
(it) di colore - black, of African descent (only used for people)


It works the same in Portuguese. Uma pessoa de cor = a black person

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) serra - saw ((it) sega)
(it) serra - greenhouse ((pt) estufa)


It also means mountain or hill
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: True false friends

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-12-18, 18:03

Luís wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:(pt) de cor - colored
(it) di colore - black, of African descent (only used for people)


It works the same in Portuguese. Uma pessoa de cor = a black person

"Colored", at least in a U.S. context, also typically refers to black people (and is offensive/dated). "Of color" on the other hand refers to anyone who isn't white.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-18, 18:21

Dormouse559 wrote:
Luís wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:(pt) de cor - colored
(it) di colore - black, of African descent (only used for people)


It works the same in Portuguese. Uma pessoa de cor = a black person

"Colored", at least in a U.S. context, also typically refers to black people (and is offensive/dated). "Of color" on the other hand refers to anyone who isn't white.


What I meant is that in Italian it only means "of African descent". In Portuguese I've found it in many phrases with the meaning of "with color(s)", even referring to objects.

Luís wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:(pt) lâmina - blade
(it) lamina - foil ((pt) papel [de metal])


papel de alumínio


Whoops, I think I mistranslated it. Lamina is a layer, usually of metal, like this one

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Re: True false friends

Postby Luís » 2018-12-18, 19:43

(ro) pernă pillow
(pt) perna leg
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-18, 22:03

(pt) calças - pants ((it) pantaloni)
(it) calze - pantyhose ((pt) meia justa)

(pt) camiseta - t-shirt ((it) maglietta a mezze maniche, t-shirt)
(it) camicetta - blouse ((pt) blusa)

(pt) colete - undershirt ((it) canottiera)
(it) colletto - shirt collar ((pt) gola)

(pt) colar - necklace ((it) collana)
(it) collare - dog collar ((pt) coleira)

(pt) poupar - to save up ((it) risparmiare)
(it) poppare - to suckle ((pt) amamentar)

(pt) lata - can ((it) lattina)
(it) latta - tin ((pt) folha de flandres)

(pt) albergue - hostel ((it) ostello)
(it) albergo - hotel ((pt) hotel)

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-19, 13:55

(pt) fonte - fountain ((it) fontana)
(it) fonte - water spring ((pt) nascente)

(pt) mercearia - grocery store ((it) alimentari)
(it) merceria - sewing shop ((pt) ?)

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-12-19, 17:58

IpseDixit wrote:(pt) calças - pants ((it) pantaloni)
(it) calze - pantyhose ((pt) meia justa)

This one is just a mess in Romance, isn't it?

(ca) calces knickers; panties
(es) calzas socks
(fr) chausses hose [hist.]
(fur) cjacis/čhalcis socks

(ca) calcetes = calces
(es) calcetas tights
(fr) chaussettes socks
(it) calzette ankle socks
(pt) calcetas fetters
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Re: True false friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-12-19, 18:22

It seems that the meaning is quite variable.

In Italian there is :

(it) calze - socks
(it) calzette, calzini - short socks
(it) calzoni - pants, trousers

While calzette, calzini are the diminutive of calze, calzoni is augmentative. It's probably derived from the tights used by men during the middle ages / renaissance.

same for Sardinian :

(sc) calzas - socks
(sc) calzittas - short socks
(sc) calzones - pants, trousers

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-19, 22:25

Homine.Sardu wrote:(it) calze - socks


Oh yeah, I forgot that in some varieties of Italian calze also means "long socks".

Homine.Sardu wrote:(it) calzette


I had never heard this.

Homine.Sardu wrote:While calzette, calzini are the diminutive of calze, calzoni is augmentative. It's probably derived from the tights used by men during the middle ages / renaissance.


And then there is calzoncini (shorts) which is the diminutive of an augmentative.

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Re: True false friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-12-20, 1:17

Homine.Sardu wrote:It seems that the meaning is quite variable.

In Italian there is :

(it) calze - socks
(it) calzette, calzini - short socks
(it) calzoni - pants, trousers

While calzette, calzini are the diminutive of calze, calzoni is augmentative. It's probably derived from the tights used by men during the middle ages / renaissance.

same for Sardinian :

(sc) calzas - socks
(sc) calzittas - short socks
(sc) calzones - pants, trousers


Also Spanish:
(es) calzas breeches, leggings
(es) calzado footwear
(es) calcetas tights, stockings, (high) socks
(es) calcetines (short) socks
(es) calzones shorts, underpants, panties, boxer shorts
(es) calzoncillos underpants, boxer shorts
(es-MX) calzonetas swimming trunks
While we're at it, there's also:
(it) (en) (es) calzone folded pizza turnover

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Re: True false friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-12-20, 16:17

Not to mention (it) calzettoni = socks long up to the knee, often made of thick wool

It's the augmentative of "calzette"

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Re: True false friends

Postby Naava » 2018-12-20, 16:32

And thanks to you, I learnt the Finnish word kalsarit comes from Italian calzoni*. :) It means 'long underpants', such as these, although I've seen some people use it to refer to any (men's) underpants.

It's also part of the word kalsarikännit, which is a truly beautiful concept.

*It wasn't loaned directly from Italian, though, but through several other languages.

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-12-20, 17:31

Homine.Sardu wrote:Not to mention (it) calzettoni = socks long up to the knee, often made of thick wool

It's the augmentative of "calzette"

This reminded me that Louisiana French has two words for "socks": chaussettes are smaller, more lightweight, and typically worn by women and children and chaussons are heavier and preferred by men.

In Standard French, chaussons are slippers.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-20, 17:44

(pt-br) sorvete - ice cream
(it) sorbetto - sorbet

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-12-20, 17:52

IpseDixit wrote:(pt-br) sorvete - ice cream
(it) sorbetto - sorbet

(es) sorbeto/sorbete sorbet
(es-SV) sorbete ice cream
(es-PR) sorbete drinking straw
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-12-20, 18:10

This is... interesting:

(pt) constipação - common cold ((it) raffreddore)
(it) costipazione - constipation ((pt) obstipação)

(also, please someone make false friends stahp)

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2019-01-02, 17:18

(en) reek
(de) riechen to smell [all senses]
(nl) rieken to stink
(nl-BE) rieken to smell [all senses]
(no) ryke to smoke/steam; to snap; to fall suddenly
(sv) ryka to [emit] smoke
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2019-01-10, 18:16

(de) all all
(lu) al old

Example: Vun ale Mënsche kann ee villes léieren. (I read this as "You can learn a lot from everyone" instead of "You can learn a lot from old people".)
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Re: True false friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2019-01-10, 23:34

(en) ingenuity (in Italian "ingegnosità, ingegno")
(it) ingenuità (in English "naivety, innocence")


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