True false friends

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-08-26, 15:23

(br) douar earth
(fr) douar nomadic camp, Arab village
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Re: True false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2018-08-26, 20:05

IpseDixit wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:(de) trinken - to drink
(pt-br) trincar - to nibble

(it) trincare - to drink avidly

(it) drinkare - to drink (unfortunately I've seen it...)

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-08-27, 14:16

(fr) bagnole (argot) car
(fr) [Picard] bagnole hovel

(fr) rater to miss; to fail
(en) rate

And this isn't a false friend per se, but given that (fr) natte means "mat", you might expect (fr) natté to mean "matted". But natte also means "braid" so natté is actually "braided".
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-08-28, 14:35

(de) schüren poke, stir up
(nl) schuren scour, chafe
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-06, 17:56

(de) Potpourri
(en) potpourri

On paper, these have nearly identical definitions. In actual practice, the primary meaning of potpourri in English is "aromatic dried plant material" and I don't recall ever hearing it applied to music without further qualification (e.g. "a potpourri of military songs"). Meanwhile, the primary meaning of Potpourri in German is covered by the English term "medley".

So when I read a description of a restaurant and come across the line "Wenn das Potpourri aus war..." my first thought is that there must be dishes of potpourri at each table and I'm confused how they could get used up in the course of an evening.
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-06, 22:17

(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window
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IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-09-07, 9:21

linguoboy wrote:(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window

(it) balcone balcony

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Re: True false friends

Postby Luís » 2018-09-07, 9:59

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window

(it) balcone balcony


(pt) balcão counter
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IpseDixit

Re: True false friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-09-07, 10:25

Luís wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window

(it) balcone balcony


(pt) balcão counter


In Italian "counter" is bancone :lol:

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Re: True false friends

Postby Luís » 2018-09-07, 12:57

IpseDixit wrote:
Luís wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window

(it) balcone balcony


(pt) balcão counter


In Italian "counter" is bancone :lol:


According to my dictionary, balcão actually comes from Italian balcone, but I guess the meaning changed over time. Nowadays the common word for "balcony" is varanda.
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-07, 14:27

Luís wrote:According to my dictionary, balcão actually comes from Italian balcone, but I guess the meaning changed over time. Nowadays the common word for "balcony" is varanda.

In English, a veranda is quite different from a balcony. Typically, it runs along the ground floor and is much more extensive. I think the closest Portuguese equivalent would be alpendre or galeria.

(Primary meanings only.)

(de) Bord shelf
(en) board
(ga) bord table
(nl) bord plate, dish
(sv) bord table
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Re: True false friends

Postby Luís » 2018-09-07, 14:38

linguoboy wrote:
Luís wrote:According to my dictionary, balcão actually comes from Italian balcone, but I guess the meaning changed over time. Nowadays the common word for "balcony" is varanda.

In English, a veranda is quite different from a balcony. Typically, it runs along the ground floor and is much more extensive. I think the closest Portuguese equivalent would be alpendre or galeria.


Interestingly enough, it seems English veranda actually comes from Portuguese (via Hindi)

Etymonline wrote:veranda (n.)
also verandah, 1711, Anglo-Indian, from Hindi varanda, which probably is from Portuguese varanda, originally "long balcony or terrace," of uncertain origin, possibly related to Spanish baranda "railing," and ultimately from Vulgar Latin *barra "barrier, bar."


Wiktionary wrote:Borrowed from Hindi बरामदा m ‎(barāmdā‎) or बरण्डा m ‎(baraṇḍā‎), from Portuguese varanda ‎(“balustrade; balcony”‎)
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Re: True false friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-09-07, 15:52

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(fr) balcon balcony
(fur) balcon window
(vec) balcon window

(it) balcone balcony


(sc) balcone window

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-07, 20:57

(ca) pilota ball
(it) pilota pilot

(fur) garofol rose
(vec) garòfoło carnation
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Re: True false friends

Postby languagepotato » 2018-09-12, 8:58

dabbling a bit in welsh and came across the: 'Siopwr dw i' which i immediately read as 'i am a shopper'
therefore:

(cy) siopwr - shopkeeper
(en) shopper
native: (ar-MA) (nl)
very comfortable: (en-US)
somewhat comfortable: (de) (es) (af)
forgetting: (fr) (ar-arb)
touristy level: (ro) (sv)(ber)(pl)
someday hopefully: (ja) (sq) (cs) (tr) and many others

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Re: True false friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-09-14, 4:56

I don't mean to cross-post*, but it seems relevant: I thought that some of you who are following this thread might be interested in knowing that I've started a thread for this kind of semantic divergence in Uralic languages: Cognates and semantic shifts. They are etymologically-related words whose meanings have diverged. For example:

KomiZyrian (kv) вем brain
Moksha (mdf) вайме breath, soul
Estonian (et) vaim spirit, ghost
Northern Saami (sme) váibmu heart
Finnish (fi) vaimo wife

Livonian (liv) lȭnag southeast, midday meal
Estonian (et) lõuna south; midday meal
Votic (vot) lõunaz south, midday meal
Finnish (fi) lounas southwest, midday meal
Udmurt (udm) луназе during the day (dialect; standard нуназе)
Komi (kv) лун day

*Yeah, I'm cross-posting these two examples now, but by posting this one post here now it will help me avoid the later temptation of cross-posting the rest of them to this thread. If you want to see more, or add to that thread, the link is above. :D

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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-14, 14:49

Dormouse559 wrote:(en) rando - arbitrary person you have no social connection to
(fr) rando - walk, trek (for pleasure)

Just stumbled over this one today!

(ca) pota paw
(gl) pota pot
(pt) pota giant squid
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Re: True false friends

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-09-14, 17:10

linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote:(en) rando - arbitrary person you have no social connection to
(fr) rando - walk, trek (for pleasure)

Just stumbled over this one today!

Ah, cool! What was the context?
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Re: True false friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-09-14, 17:28

Dormouse559 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) rando - walk, trek (for pleasure)

Just stumbled over this one today!

Ah, cool! What was the context?

An excursus on tourism in France as the narrator contrasts it to Germany.
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Re: True false friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-09-16, 7:47

Dormouse559 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote:(en) rando - arbitrary person you have no social connection to
(fr) rando - walk, trek (for pleasure)

Just stumbled over this one today!

Ah, cool! What was the context?


The English "Rando" seems to be cognate of the Italian "Randagio" (stray animal, also used as synonymous of vagabond)


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