Multilingual True Friends

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-12-27, 18:27

Greek (el) το μάτι (to) máti - eye
Various Austronesian languages: mata - eye

Minangkabau: aia - water
Yurumanguí: aia - water

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby aaakknu » 2018-01-08, 17:57

(et) vist
(dk) vist
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-01-09, 3:58

(fr) mer sea
(liv) mer sea

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-09, 4:42

English (en) to call
Greek (el) καλώ kaló - I call (also: I hail/summon/invite/dial)

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby languagepotato » 2018-01-17, 15:22

(en) another
Senhaja (ber) naðën /nˤɒðˤn/ - another/the other


(en) one
Senhaja (ber) iwën /ɪw:n/ - one
native: (ar-MA) (nl)
very comfortable: (en-US)
somewhat comfortable: (de) (es) (af)
forgetting: (fr) (ar-arb)
touristy level: (ro) (sv)(ber)(pl)
someday hopefully: (ja) (sq) (cs) (tr) and many others

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-01-17, 18:57

(fi) pähkinä nut, hazelnut
pagann hard nut, walnut, hazelnut
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-01-18, 5:29

linguoboy wrote:(fi) pähkinä nut, hazelnut
pagann hard nut, walnut, hazelnut

(en) pecan (from Algonquin through French)
(liv) pē’gõz nut, hazelnut

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2018-01-18, 9:37

Irusia wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Michael wrote:(sq) at/ë, -i, etër(it) father (archaic/dialectal)
(tr) ata father

The two are not cognates, the former having roots in PIE and being cognate with the Serbo-Croatian otac and Ancient Greek ἄττα, while the latter has roots in Proto-Turkic.

Yupik (ypk-ESU) ata - father

(kl) ataata - father


Qingtianese: 阿大 [æʔta] - dad
Wenzhounese: 阿大 [ata] - dad

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-18, 17:16

Indonesian (id) cuma - only, merely
Malayalam (ml) ചുമ്മ [t͡ʃumˈma] - only, merely, just (for fun), no particular reason (can also mean 'nothing much' or 'shut up!!! (as a response to something mildly embarrassing someone else said)')

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2018-01-20, 9:35

Could they be cognate from Sanskrit?

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-20, 17:26

I don't think so. AFAICT, [t͡ʃumˈma] is a native Dravidian word. Tamil, Kannada, and a few Dravidian languages spoken further north all have cognates. Kolam 'swimming pool' < /kuɭam/ 'pond' is also a Dravidian loanword in Malay/Indonesian.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-01-30, 20:25

(ko) (obsolete/dialectal) 뷔다 /buita/ be empty
(ca) buida empty (fem. sing.)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-31, 23:27

English (en) to bare (someone's hands)
Thai (th) แบ(มือ) /bɛː˧/ (/mɯː˧/) - to open out (someone's hands)
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2018-02-01, 21:22, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Homine.Sardu » 2018-02-01, 8:28

linguoboy wrote:(ko) (obsolete/dialectal) 뷔다 /buita/ be empty
(ca) buida empty (fem. sing.)


(sc) bòida = empty (fem. sing.)
(sc) bòidu = empty (mas. sing.)
(en) void = empty

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby הענט » 2018-02-01, 12:26

OldBoring wrote:
Irusia wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Michael wrote:(sq) at/ë, -i, etër(it) father (archaic/dialectal)
(tr) ata father

The two are not cognates, the former having roots in PIE and being cognate with the Serbo-Croatian otac and Ancient Greek ἄττα, while the latter has roots in Proto-Turkic.

Yupik (ypk-ESU) ata - father

(kl) ataata - father


Qingtianese: 阿大 [æʔta] - dad
Wenzhounese: 阿大 [ata] - dad


Pretty much every Chinese dialect uses apa(aba) only Mandarin speakers say baba or fuqin. Right?

Btw. How do you say TV in Qingtianese? In Wenzhounese it's dizze or something like that.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-01, 17:15

(en) heart
(ms)(id) hati heart [as the seat of emotions, etc; lit. "liver"]
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-02-01, 21:29

Huh, that's like Malayalam, using the word for 'liver' to mean the seat of emotions! Lakshadweep Malayalam a.k.a. Jeseri apparently has [ˈkaːttɯ] for 'heart'. It's a (Dravidianized) loanword from English and a false friend with the mainland Malayalam word for 'wind', which is also pronounced [ˈkaːttɯ].
Hent wrote:Pretty much every Chinese dialect uses apa(aba) only Mandarin speakers say baba or fuqin. Right?

Sort of, I guess, but I have heard [papa] in Wenzhounese before.
Btw. How do you say TV in Qingtianese? In Wenzhounese it's dizze or something like that.

I think it's something like [da̤zɨ].

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2018-02-04, 20:14

(sq) i,e mahnitur amazed
(az) mahnı song

I have a hunch that the Albanian word was an Ottoman loan too.
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby razlem » 2018-02-06, 7:22

(pt) garfo (fork)
(sv) gaffel (fork)

Interestingly, the proto form of the Germanic *gabalō (fork/split) is originally from Proto-Celtic "gablā" and enters English as "gable" from French :D
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2018-02-07, 20:55

vijayjohn wrote:
Hent wrote:Pretty much every Chinese dialect uses apa(aba) only Mandarin speakers say baba or fuqin. Right?

Sort of, I guess, but I have heard [papa] in Wenzhounese before.

Fuqin means father, is quite a formal word... nobody calls their own dad fuqin.
A lot of Chinese dialects nowadays use baba (actually with [p] consonant), though the general trend seems that children tend to say [papa] and adults tend to say [pa] (one syllable).
Other words used traditionally throughout China are die [tjɛ] and da [ta].
Wenzhounese and Qingtianese traditionally belong to the da area.

In Wenzhounese I've ever heard [papa] only in very young children, probably babies and toddlers. Normally I hear only [apa]. In Wenzhounese almost every family kinship starts with [a], including mum, dad, older and younger brother, older and younger sister, various kinds of uncle, various kinds of aunts, grandpa, etc.

In Qingtianese children tend to say [papa], while teenagers and adults tend to say [pa] or [æʔpa]. I switched when I was about 12 or 13. Personally I just say [pa], without the [æʔ] prefix.

The traditional words [ta]/[ata]/[æʔta] are becoming rarer nowadays and almost unused in my generation. But people still use them to refer to "dad" in third person and considered familiar/informal register.
Btw. How do you say TV in Qingtianese? In Wenzhounese it's dizze or something like that.

I think it's something like [da̤zɨ].

In Wenzhounese [dizɨ].
In Qingtianese [djazɨ].

[ɨ] being the same vowel of Mandarin dianshi.


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