Multilingual True Friends

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-03, 20:20

Linguaphile wrote:[flag=]in[/flag] tasku = my bag

Where in the world did you get this?

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-06-03, 20:52

vijayjohn wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:[flag=]in[/flag] tasku = my bag

Where in the world did you get this?

Oops, I typed the wrong code for the flag. It's Indonesian (also Malay, I think), so that Indian flag shouldn't be there. I've fixed the flag code from "in" to "id". Thanks for pointing it out!

[flag=]en[/flag] calamari = squid
[flag=]et[/flag] kalamari = caviar

[flag=]id[/flag] tasku = my bag
[flag=]et[/flag] tasku = pocket

[flag=]kk[/flag] есік [esik] = door
[flag=]et[/flag] esik = entryway
Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere. El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes. Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal. Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt. L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout. Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw. Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2017-06-04, 20:44

Calamari is Italian for squid, but I've heard English speakers use it specifically for fried squid rings.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-06-04, 21:16

OldBoring wrote:Calamari is Italian for squid, but I've heard English speakers use it specifically for fried squid rings.

Technically the meaning in English is just squid served as food. I just thought it was an interesting coincidence that Estonian kalamari also refers to food from the sea, although it is a different sort of food. Kalamari for "caviar" literally means "fish berry" (kala fish, mari berry). No relation to English/Italian calamari whatsoever.

I also just found out that (amazingly) Estonian tasku 'pocket' and Indonesian tasku 'my bag' actually are true cognates rather than a coincidence. Both are adopted loanwords descended from Germanic taske, with the Indonesian word coming via Dutch tas (with the Indonesian possessive -ku added) and the Estonian word coming via German Tasche. Amazing that an Austronesian language and a Finno-Uralic language can have such a cognate!
Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere. El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes. Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal. Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt. L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout. Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw. Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby dEhiN » 2017-06-06, 4:52

Linguaphile wrote:
OldBoring wrote:Calamari is Italian for squid, but I've heard English speakers use it specifically for fried squid rings.

Technically the meaning in English is just squid served as food.

Yeah although in my experience calamari by itself connotes fried breaded squid rings. So if a menu said something like "boiled calamari", then I'd know the rings are boiled. Also, I wonder if in English calamari specifically refers to the head of the squid and doesn't include the tentacles? Because I've never seen "calamari tentacles" on a menu though I have seen "squid tentacles".
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-06-06, 5:18

dEhiN wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
OldBoring wrote:Calamari is Italian for squid, but I've heard English speakers use it specifically for fried squid rings.

Technically the meaning in English is just squid served as food.

Yeah although in my experience calamari by itself connotes fried breaded squid rings. So if a menu said something like "boiled calamari", then I'd know the rings are boiled. Also, I wonder if in English calamari specifically refers to the head of the squid and doesn't include the tentacles? Because I've never seen "calamari tentacles" on a menu though I have seen "squid tentacles".

Dictionary just says "squid served as food" and the internet does have recipes for "calamari tentacles" (and "calamari steak") so... I think it can be any part or shape, not just the rings. I'm not much of a seafood eater, truthfully I've never paid attention to how it is listed on menus. I just look for the chicken or vegetarian dishes. :)
Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere. El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes. Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal. Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt. L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout. Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw. Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-06, 10:25

Whenever I hear "calamari" in English, I immediately think of (batter-)fried calamari rings.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2017-06-06, 12:32

I want some fried calamari rings now.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Vlürch » 2017-06-07, 0:14

Linguaphile wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:[flag=]in[/flag] tasku = my bag

Where in the world did you get this?

Oops, I typed the wrong code for the flag. It's Indonesian (also Malay, I think), so that Indian flag shouldn't be there. I've fixed the flag code from "in" to "id". Thanks for pointing it out!

[flag=]en[/flag] calamari = squid
[flag=]et[/flag] kalamari = caviar

[flag=]id[/flag] tasku = my bag
[flag=]et[/flag] tasku = pocket

[flag=]kk[/flag] есік [esik] = door
[flag=]et[/flag] esik = entryway

Finnish (fi) kalmari - squid
Finnish (fi) tasku - pocket

Also, isn't the Kazakh word pronounced /jesik/ [jɘsɪk]? I thought word-initial е is always /je/, eg. Kazakh (kk) еркек [jɘrkʲɘk] - man.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-06-07, 3:42

Vlürch wrote:Finnish (fi) kalmari - squid
Finnish (fi) tasku - pocket

Kiitos!

Vlürch wrote:isn't the Kazakh word pronounced /jesik/ [jɘsɪk]? I thought word-initial е is always /je/, eg. Kazakh (kk) еркек [jɘrkʲɘk] - man.

Yes but it is written esik. Both alphabets (Latin and Cyrillic) are used.
Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere. El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes. Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal. Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt. L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout. Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw. Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-07, 3:59

Ah, so what you want is angled brackets (<>), not square ones ([])! [esik] looks like a phonetic transcription; a representation of the spelling would look like this: <esik>.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2017-06-08, 0:38

[flag=]sq[/flag] ku where?
[flag=]fa[/flag] کو ku archaic/poetic version of کجا؟ kojâ "where?"
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-08, 0:55

Serafín wrote:This might've been posted already...

English he
Piraha hi 'he, she, it, they'

Nope. In fact, congratulations, you are the first UniLanger to post a single word of Piraha outside the CSAIL forum!

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby dEhiN » 2017-06-08, 7:23

vijayjohn wrote:
Serafín wrote:This might've been posted already...

English he
Piraha hi 'he, she, it, they'

Nope. In fact, congratulations, you are the first UniLanger to post a single word of Piraha outside the CSAIL forum!

I must've missed when Serafin posted that, but how did this come about? Did Piraha borrow from English?
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-08, 8:19

dEhiN wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
Serafín wrote:This might've been posted already...

English he
Piraha hi 'he, she, it, they'

Nope. In fact, congratulations, you are the first UniLanger to post a single word of Piraha outside the CSAIL forum!

I must've missed when Serafin posted that, but how did this come about? Did Piraha borrow from English?

No. It's just a coincidence.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Ser » 2017-06-11, 0:02

Oooh, I'd now like to expand on this:
Serafín wrote:English he
Piraha hi 'he, she, it, they'

Shanghainese Wu 伊 [ɦi˩˧] 'he, she'

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-06-14, 16:03

[flag=]id[/flag] dunia - world
[flag=]tr[/flag] dünya - world

Oh well, it seems this word has spread across so many languages.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-06-14, 23:49

IpseDixit wrote:[flag=]id[/flag] dunia - world
[flag=]tr[/flag] dünya - world

Oh well, it seems this word has spread across so many languages.

Yes. Things like that kind of tend to happen with the worldwide spread of Islam. :P

Some Muslim Malayalees probably use that word in their everyday vocabulary, too.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2017-06-15, 0:51

vijayjohn wrote:Yes. Things like that kind of tend to happen with the worldwide spread of Islam. :P

Some Muslim Malayalees probably use that word in their everyday vocabulary, too.

Yeah, it's present even in colloquial Greek to this day, as ντουνιά, not to mention in Albanian (which is rich in Ottoman-era loans and not afraid to show it).
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“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby OldBoring » 2017-07-05, 20:35

Serafín wrote:Oooh, I'd now like to expand on this:
Serafín wrote:English he
Piraha hi 'he, she, it, they'

Shanghainese Wu 伊 [ɦi˩˧] 'he, she'

I really don't know why they use ɦ when transcribing the consonant before i in Wu Chinese. To me it sounds like more [ji].


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