suggestions about slavonics

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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby księżycowy » 2011-05-12, 10:32

Saim wrote:Seriously, all your posts here have been "wa wa declensions, wa wa foreign scripts". If you don't want to learn new grammatical features and writing systems, then don't! But then don't come on here and whine about how difficult it is.

Indeed, declensions and conjugations maybe hard at first, but all that you (Lenguas) need to do is give it time to absorb. Just like the script, the more you work at it the easier it is. But not learning the declensions and/or conjugations you're really fucking yourself up in the end.

Plus isn't that theoretically why we're all here at Unilang? To ask questions when we're lost and get help from native speakers and other learners?

So in short, good posts Saim and voron! :)

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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby Æxylis » 2011-05-14, 6:03

somebody mentioned that ukrainian and belarusian are kind of a dialect continuum between russian and polish or sth like that... are ukrainian and belarusian that similar? would one be able to understand the other fairly easily if one knows one of them? Most of the other slavlangs aside from serbian don't really interest me much and I have mixed feelings about polish so as far as a secondary slavic lang to 'look into' right now belarusian and ukrainian are looking the best for me...
the idea of macedonian and bulgarian losing the use of the cases kinda feels, idk, boring, cheap, lame, non-slavic, somewhere along those lines... :whistle:
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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby voron » 2011-05-14, 11:57

邪悪歌 wrote:somebody mentioned that ukrainian and belarusian are kind of a dialect continuum between russian and polish or sth like that... are ukrainian and belarusian that similar? would one be able to understand the other fairly easily if one knows one of them? Most of the other slavlangs aside from serbian don't really interest me much and I have mixed feelings about polish so as far as a secondary slavic lang to 'look into' right now belarusian and ukrainian are looking the best for me...
the idea of macedonian and bulgarian losing the use of the cases kinda feels, idk, boring, cheap, lame, non-slavic, somewhere along those lines... :whistle:


Russian Ukrainian and Belarusian relate to each other pretty much the same as Danish Swedish and Norwegian do - there are phonological, morphological and syntactical differences, as well as vocabulary differences, but they do not generally prevent mutual understanding (this might be less true for Russians who are less likely to be exposed to other 2 languages).

would one be able to understand the other fairly easily if one knows one of them?

If one is a foreigner who reached a good overall level in one the languages, then with just a few lessons introducing them basical phonology rules and vocabulary differences, it should be fairly easy.

somebody mentioned that ukrainian and belarusian are kind of a dialect continuum between russian and polish or sth like that... are ukrainian and belarusian that similar?

The fact that they fill the continuum gap between Russian and Polish does not imply per se that they must be close, does it (they might be close on X-axis but distant on Y-axis).

Belarusian might be harder to start with since many resources for it assume that you already have at least some knowledge of Russian. As far as I know Ukrainian is more accessible without any prior knowledge of any Slavic language.

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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby księżycowy » 2011-05-14, 14:19

Cool, so if I learn some Russian and some Ukrainian I should be able to pick up some Belorussian quite easily! :D

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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby Æxylis » 2011-05-14, 14:30

I like the look and feel of ukrainian and belarusian compared to russian, and that ï is pretty nifty :lol:
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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby księżycowy » 2011-05-14, 14:56

Yeah, that letter is pretty cool. Ukrainian is an awesome language. Hell, I don't think I've met a Slavic language I didn't like!

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Re: suggestions about slavonics

Postby katmornie » 2017-10-30, 21:06

I'm only familiar with Czech (I'm moving there and so have started to work with it) but I like the sound of it. Also consonant clusters don't happen much in English and I find them amusing to play with :)

Czech seems difficult for the same reason I found German difficult, which would be the cases (of course). I have been using this link for case practice, and Duolingo to get a feel for the grammar. Also Czech music and movies are a good way to relax after studying some other way. You can find really great movies quickly via European film awards lists, on Wikipedia or otherwise.


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