Multilingual false friends

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-06-14, 14:03

Levike wrote:- Where do you come from?
- From Dili.
- How dare you talk like that about your mum!
:evil:

Lol

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2016-06-15, 17:38

Vlürch wrote:Sanskrit (sa) स्वस्तिक (svástika) - swastika
...

[flag=]zh[/flag] 卐, 卍 (yes, they are actual Chinese characters) - ancient variants of the hanzi 万 (ten thousand)
(Hinduist and Buddhist countries) 卐, 卍 - Hinduist and Buddhist symbols
(Rest of the world) - Nazism
(Rest of the world) - Inverted Nazism symbol

Italian (it) salame - salami
...

When we watched the movie The Kite-runner they really often said salaam so a classmate of mine said: "...and I'm gonna reply with 'Prosciutt!'" (prosciutto meaning cured ham in Italian).

And here's my "false friend" for salami:

[flag=]zh[/flag] (in the city of Wenzhou only) 萨啦咪/Salami - a trademark specialized in roasted meat-based snacks, the kind that Chinese people like:
Chicken drumettes
Chicken wings (the older packages even have a sentence in German :lol: , which I don't know if it's correct)
Duck tongues (a local specialty of the city)
This is the closest thing to "salami" they have

Well this post was weird.
I hope the first one counts, even though it's a symbol and not a word in other languages.
And I hope the second one doesn't count as spam. :lol:
Last edited by OldBoring on 2016-06-15, 18:31, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-06-15, 18:14

OldBoring wrote:(Hinduist and Buddhist countries) 卐, 卍 - Hinduist and Buddhist symbols

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2016-06-15, 18:32

Thanks. I always forget that Hindu is already an adjective and there's no such word as *Hinduist in English.

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-06-15, 18:38

Actually, there is, but it's a noun, not an adjective, and even then "Hindu" is much more common than "Hinduist" IME anyway. ;)

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby Hypocrisy » 2016-06-15, 19:14

samarqand wrote:In [flag=]tr[/flag] the word 'am' is slang for vagina (so I'm not surprised at the Kazakh example since they are both Turkic languages) lol... Which is why they recommend you say 'er' instead of 'um' when in Turkey XD

Vlürch wrote:I bursted out laughing like I'd just heard the best joke in the world because if you read the English translations of the different ams as a sentence, it becomes "this mouth cunt now... um... mother" which sounds pretty fucking incestuous.


samarqand wrote:Which leads me to:
[flag=]en[/flag] sick
[flag=]tr[/flag] sik - fuck, dick, etc

Instead of saying "I'm sick" when you're in Turkey, say: "I'm unwell/ill". Or if you know Turkish, you'd say, "Hastayım" (lit: sick-I-am).

Vlürch wrote:I bursted out laughing again like I'd heard the best joke in the world, holy shit. I wonder if this means Turkish people never say stuff like "that's sick, man!" if they're speaking English? I mean, they probably do, but it probably feels a little weird on the inside to say it if it sounds like they're calling their friends dicks or all the things they do dick moves. Then again, I'm not sure if anyone says stuff like "that's sick, man!" or even uses the word "sick" to describe something cool anymore, so it might not even be an issue.


Well, yeah. It, indeed, sounds a little bit weird using certain words in the English language, especially the ones mentioned above. However, it just takes time to get used to the pronunciation of weird words in a foreign language as you start interpreting sentences without translating into your mother tongue.

There's this grand exception I can't seem to overlook when I encounter. You know, in American movies, they show the present time with a digital stamp on the screen or as a shot of a digital clock. When you see something like "10 AM" , you do nothing but grin :D .

While we're at it, let's take on another example with which the Turkish youth are having the biggest of problems. If your phone doesn't support the Turkish alphabet or you set the keyboard as English mistakenly, you might cause hilarious misunderstandings :lol: .

sıkılmak - to get bored
sikilmek - to get fucked

"Sıkılıyorum." - "I'm bored."
"Sikiliyorum." - "I'm getting fucked."

uzferry

Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby uzferry » 2016-06-15, 20:14

Does this one fit here?

[flag=]fr[/flag] Avertissement - Warning
[flag=]en[/flag] Advertisement

Thanks :)

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-06-15, 20:16

Sure, or it could go into the "true false friends" thread.

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby Car » 2016-06-16, 9:54

OldBoring wrote:Chicken wings (the older packages even have a sentence in German :lol: , which I don't know if it's correct)

The second word doesn't make any sense (did they mean Wurst?), but the rest is correct - apart from proper capitalisation, that is. How come they use German?
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby samarqand » 2016-06-16, 13:23

Hypocrisy wrote:There's this grand exception I can't seem to overlook when I encounter. You know, in American movies, they show the present time with a digital stamp on the screen or as a shot of a digital clock. When you see something like "10 AM" , you do nothing but grin :D .

HAHAHAA I grinned as well XD

Hypocrisy wrote:sıkılmak - to get bored
sikilmek - to get fucked

"Sıkılıyorum." - "I'm bored."
"Sikiliyorum." - "I'm getting fucked."

Okay, now I'm laughing out loud now!!! I've been studying Turkish casually for a while now so I know how important the correct letters are :P In a Turkish phrasebook I have, they give this example:

Kızları oldu - 'they had a baby girl'
Kızları öldü - 'their baby died'

Vlürch wrote:I bursted out laughing again like I'd heard the best joke in the world, holy shit. I wonder if this means Turkish people never say stuff like "that's sick, man!" if they're speaking English? I mean, they probably do, but it probably feels a little weird on the inside to say it if it sounds like they're calling their friends dicks or all the things they do dick moves. Then again, I'm not sure if anyone says stuff like "that's sick, man!" or even uses the word "sick" to describe something cool anymore, so it might not even be an issue.

I have a good friend from Turkey and we talk a lot. His English is excellent. I've asked him about the 'um' thing before, especially when we were first Skyping because I tend to say 'um' instead of pausing or saying 'er'. But he says he's so used to English that he doesn't bat an eyelid anymore. Same thing for 'sick' haha. But it's still a funny joke sometimes. :rotfl:
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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2016-06-16, 17:23

Car wrote:
OldBoring wrote:Chicken wings (the older packages even have a sentence in German :lol: , which I don't know if it's correct)

The second word doesn't make any sense (did they mean Wurst?), but the rest is correct - apart from proper capitalisation, that is. How come they use German?

Yea probably Wurst. I think because in China they market things as Western to make them look like of better quality, or sophisticated and exotic. In particular it may be because Germany is famous for the sausages and the meat (in particular the Eisbein) so maybe that's why they chose Germany. But actually Western cuisine in general is perceived as being rich of meat, like steaks, cutlets, barbecued/roast meat.
The brand also has a white male chef as their logo and their TV commercial is played by a white male chef speaking broken Mandarin and saying "好吃,听得见!” ("delicious, you can hear it!") with the noise of the chicken wings roasting.

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby Car » 2016-06-17, 8:34

I see. Thanks.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby Michael » 2016-07-02, 18:22

[flag=]sq[/flag] grua woman
[flag=]es[/flag] grúa tow truck
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-07-02, 21:31

Albanian (sq) grua - woman, spouse
Catalan (ca) grua - crane (bird and machine)
Galician (gl) grúa - crane (bird)
Irish (ga) grua - upper cheek, brow or edge of hill, facet
Norwegian, Bokmål (no-nb) grua - the fireplace, was/were/has been/have been queasy in anticipation of something
Portuguese (pt) grua - crane (machine), female crane
Spanish (es) grúa - tow truck, crane (machine)

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby OldBoring » 2016-07-03, 2:37

vijayjohn wrote:Albanian (sq) grua - woman, spouse
Catalan (ca) grua - crane (bird and machine)
Galician (gl) grúa - crane (bird)
Irish (ga) grua - upper cheek, brow or edge of hill, facet
Norwegian, Bokmål (no-nb) grua - the fireplace, was/were/has been/have been queasy in anticipation of something
Portuguese (pt) grua - crane (machine), female crane
Spanish (es) grúa - tow truck, crane (machine)


Lemme guess. Source: Wiktionary.

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-07-03, 3:08

Of course! :D

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby suruvaippa » 2016-07-03, 5:03

This is kind of the opposite of what's being posted here, but I don't know where else to put this so...

[flag=]en[/flag] alive / living

[flag=]fi[/flag] elävä - living (adjective)
[flag=]et[/flag] elav
[flag=]hu[/flag] eleven
Native:   (en-us) C1:   (fi) A1:   (lt)   (et)   (ru)
Interested:   (smi-sme)   (ka)   (is)   (eu)

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-07-03, 6:02

suruvaippa wrote:This is kind of the opposite of what's being posted here, but I don't know where else to put this

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=36447

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby suruvaippa » 2016-07-03, 6:12

vijayjohn wrote:
suruvaippa wrote:This is kind of the opposite of what's being posted here, but I don't know where else to put this

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=36447


Oops. :P
Native:   (en-us) C1:   (fi) A1:   (lt)   (et)   (ru)
Interested:   (smi-sme)   (ka)   (is)   (eu)

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Re: Multilingual false friends

Postby Michael » 2016-07-04, 23:08

[flag=]sq[/flag] (Gheg) cucë girl
[flag=]nap[/flag] zuzzo dirty
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”


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