Nicknames

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Patricia
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Nicknames

Postby Patricia » 2002-08-03, 15:23

Hi all!

I've always been interested in the subject of names and nicknames; their meaning, how you form them, etc.
So the question here is: How are nicknames in your country/language formed??

Here in Argentina, we tend to make nicknames by just shortening the original name: "Gabriel" would turn into "Gabi" or "Gaby", "María" into "Mari" or "Mary", etc. Sometimes there are names that carry a "fixed" nickname, for example the nickname for "Francisco" is "Pancho" and for "José", "Pepe"...Other times, the nick name can derive from a characteristic of that person (usually with a somewhat negative meaning), like "Cabezón" for someone with a big head or "Chueco" for someone with bow legs...Or perhaps it might have to do with the origin of that person: people from italian origin might be called "Tano", for example. Sometimes, the nickname has nothing to do with the points listed above and it has to do with a family thing, which makes the nickname more personal, perhaps.

Personally, my nicknames are: Pat, Patri (here's the shortened version I was mentioning before), and the most comon of all: Pato (this is the almost fixed nickname for Patricks and Patricias here in Argentina).

What are your nicknames??? Would you like to share that info with all of us???


Greetings,

Patricia.

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Weldal
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Just a few differences...

Postby Weldal » 2002-08-03, 15:42

Hi Patricia

Just a few differences: José in Brazil is "Zé" and Francisco is "Chico" (I know that this mean little boy in Spanish, but here we have different words for this: "garoto", "menino" and maybe others, depending on the region...
By the way, Patricia here is also Pat, Patty and so on...
And the diminutive "Patricinha", is also used to define a girl who likes to buy expensive clothes and go to the parties or night clubs every night...
The equivalent for men is "Mauricinho", the diminutive of "Mauricio"... :)

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Re: Nicknames

Postby Saaropean » 2002-08-03, 17:16

Patricia wrote:Hi all!

I've always been interested in the subject of names and nicknames; their meaning, how you form them, etc.
So the question here is: How are nicknames in your country/language formed??

Here in Argentina, we tend to make nicknames by just shortening the original name: "Gabriel" would turn into "Gabi" or "Gaby", "María" into "Mari" or "Mary", etc. Sometimes there are names that carry a "fixed" nickname, for example the nickname for "Francisco" is "Pancho" and for "José", "Pepe"...Other times, the nick name can derive from a characteristic of that person (usually with a somewhat negative meaning), like "Cabezón" for someone with a big head or "Chueco" for someone with bow legs...Or perhaps it might have to do with the origin of that person: people from italian origin might be called "Tano", for example. Sometimes, the nickname has nothing to do with the points listed above and it has to do with a family thing, which makes the nickname more personal, perhaps.

Personally, my nicknames are: Pat, Patri (here's the shortened version I was mentioning before), and the most comon of all: Pato (this is the almost fixed nickname for Patricks and Patricias here in Argentina).

What are your nicknames??? Would you like to share that info with all of us???


Greetings,

Patricia.


It's very similar in German.

Here are a few examples, most of which concern names for elder people:
Anton => Toni, Elisabeth => Lisa, Friedrich => Fritz, Gabriele => Gabi, Gerhard => Gerd, Johannes => Hans, Joseph => Sepp, Karl => Kalle, Katharina => Kathrin/Kati, Leopold => Leo, Margarethe => Greta, Rudolf => Rudi/Rolf, Sabine => Bine, Theodor => Theo, Ursula => Uschi, ...

Then there's the more modern, anglo-american way: Andreas/Andrea => Andy, Christian => Chris, Christina => Chris/Tina, Claudia => Claudi, Heinrich => Heinz, Manfred => Manni, Maximilian => Max, Michael => Mike, Philipp => Phil, Sebastian => Basti, Susanne => Susi, Thomas => Tommy, Ulrich/Ulrike => Ulli, ...

A nickname can vary from one region to another. And some nicknames are only used at a certain age.


I have a quite short name (Rolf), there's no need to shorten that. Well, actually my name is Rolf-Peter and many people called me Rolfi, but I started to dislike that, and now everyone calls me Rolf.

In school, it was also common to call people by their last name, who have a very common first name. We had several boys called Christian, Michael and Thomas in our class. And, for three years, even two called Patrick Becker (same first and last name).

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Patricia
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Re: Just a few differences...

Postby Patricia » 2002-08-03, 19:05

[quote="Weldal"]
And the diminutive "Patricinha", is also used to define a girl who likes to buy expensive clothes and go to the parties or night clubs every night...
quote]

Then I'll definately never be a Patricinha there, Weldal, since I never buy expensive clothes or go to night clubs....LOL

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Francy
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Postby Francy » 2002-08-03, 19:24

The nickname I usually use on internet is Ushuayia, but I gave it to myself so...

I've had a lot of nicknames in my brief life!!! Most of them are shortenings of my name or mocking at my surname... Francesca: Fra, Francy, France, Cesca, Cecca, Ceccha... Fais... most Faissa, the other better not to put them here, they're not that kind...

Usually we give nickamens with shortening the surname or the name... sometimes they're on real characteristics of the person, but more rarely. The custom to give names to the whole family is pretty old here in Italy, it survives only in small towns (the family of my father was called "barroso"... it's pretty strong in Sardinian!!)

In Italy Patricia, you'd be Patry, Pat... similar to Argentina I think... :wink:
There are more things in Heaven and Hearth than are dreamt of in your Philosophy...

<b>
www.myspace.com/ushuayia
</b>

Sarah

Postby Sarah » 2002-08-03, 19:49

The best nicknames are accidents. These are the ones friends and family stick to a person. Besides shortening names "accidental" names are usually the most commonly used. My friend fell in a pond, so jokingly we call her fish. It was probably her most embarrassing moment and we don't let her forget.

I've gotten nickmans because people claim I look like someone. I could call Brad, Kevin if I thought he looked like a kevin to me. It's interesting.

We have ethnic names also. Usually if you're American you're American-fill-in-the-blank. This bothers me, no one is just American. I don't call myself Irish-french-german-American. But these ethnic names are another branch of the identifying process here. I'm trying to think of one of these names besides deragatory. *laughs* I know one. Robert can have two connotations, dick or bob. Because of Bob the name is thus Billy Bob. This is ethnic to red necks, if you don't know that term it's white farmers in the south or sometimes on the east coast of USA that is.

We usually make nicknames by cutting off the ending. Alexander, becomes Alex. My boyfriend wants to name his future son (very distant future) Alexander to call him Zander.

And ironic terms also. For instance if you're tall your nickname is Shorty or Junior. If you're fat your nickname could be bones. Skinny = chubby or blimp.

Guest

Postby Guest » 2002-08-03, 23:59

In Polish we also shorten or twist last names. This often makes meaningful and/or funny words. Some examples: Bolikowski -> Bolo, Budzeń -> Budyń(means pudding), Cieplak -> Ciepły (means warm), Kamiński -> Kamiś (means nothing, but sounds funny).
I don't know if it's common, but among my friends (including me) nicknames change and evolve, so that from the initial nick or surname step by step they become often quite abstract words. They have no meaning for others, but can be amusing for us cause we know their history. Examples: Gendek->Gandalf->Ghandi, Piotr->Pete->Pit->Pyta(ambiguous meaning, may be considered obscene), Darek->Dark->Fire->Zefir->Zef (this is most complicated nickname i know)

Guest

Postby Guest » 2002-08-04, 0:19

hi
that was me, sorry im new.

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Islander
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Postby Islander » 2002-08-04, 13:26

Hi Patricia.
That’s an interesting question. Our nickname(s) are usually based on children’s pronunciations. That is the way you pronounced your own name as a child.
Some examples:
Jóhan becomes Hanne or Hanneba (ba is brother or boy in children’s vocabulary)
Pól or Poul becomes Polleman (mostly based on adults determination on a nickname to the kid :roll: )
Pauli becomes Palle
Margreta becomes Maggi
Elisabet becomes Elsa or Betta
Etc…..

Cheers!
Gløgt er gestsins eyga...

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MiRi
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nicknames

Postby MiRi » 2002-08-04, 16:16

Hi,

my real name is Michaela. In school they called me Michi, now friends call me Micha and my parents call me Ela.

MiRi
(my nick here is a mixture out of my first and second first name)

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Weldal
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My nickname

Postby Weldal » 2002-08-04, 17:36

Well, I don't know the reason for these expressions "Patricinha"and "Mauricinho" here, I just know that they appeared in the late 80's, or maybe, early 90's and became very popular here...
And I believe that you are not a "Patricinha", I'm sure. A real "Patricinha" would never learn languages nor using the Internet, she would be too much busy buying fashion clothes or going to the night clubs... :D
About my real name: I'm almost sure that there is no nickname for Cassio. 4 or 5 years ago, on another forum where I firstly met Aba (one year before he decided to create the Language and Culture Forum which was somehow a previous version of this Unilang Forum), I used the initials of my whole name, but after having problems with fake messages, I decided that I would never use again anything related to my name as a nickname, so I created this nickname "Weldal", based on the subject of my doctorship thesis (Welded Aluminum)....

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Sou
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Thai Nicks

Postby Sou » 2002-08-05, 11:18

Hi!

Dear Danny, for me, Tagalog nickname system is not that bizarre to me :)
In Thailand, having a nickname is a MUST. And the nicknames don't have
to rhyme with or descend from the first name...... It's of parent's decision,
or the kids themselves to decide which nickname they'd like to be called,
but yes, there're some nicks that friends give you, if you ressemble any
personality, or you have a clearly-notable characteristics. A person can
have a lot of nicknames, depending on his/her membership of societies,
some can be called at home 'Snubby' and called at school 'Loonie', and
'Clumsy' where he/she works :)

Thai nick is a separated name, there's nothing to do with the first name
of its owner, e.g. my name is 'Pokpong WONGKAEO' (Pokpong means to
protect) my nick that mom and dad named me is 'Solo' --you see? it's nothing
about the first name, I go to school and my friends call me 'Diao\' ('Diao\' is
Thai, also the same meaning 'Solo'), and here on the Internet, to dedicate to my auxlang, I named myself as 'Sou' (the meaning still the same).

Some people's nick can come from the way we call animals, Muu~ (pig --it's
not ugly to call people here pig, unless they're fat), Nuu~ (mouse), Plaa- (fish),
or Mæo- (Cat).

Some are named after the ideal personality of parents to their kids, e.g. Suai~
(beautiful), Son- (funny), Rak/ (love), Zaa^ (naughty).




Where's the toilet?
Sous l'ombre de Bouddha, je prends refuge.
Sous l'ombre de Dharma, je prends refuge.
Sous l'ombre de Sangha, je prends refuge.

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Postby Chris2 » 2002-08-06, 22:30

¡Hola, Pat!

As far as I have seen, nicknames all over the world and throughout the languages tend to shorten the real names to a measure that can be spoken in the fastest and easiest way. My name, Christian, in Germany ususally is a Chris or Chrissy (bavarian form, adopted by all my friends).
Sometimes, anyhow, the nickname can be somewhat longer, making a "Klausi" out of a Klaus, a "Ralfi" out of a Ralf, adding some tenderness and trust to the real name.
As Saaropean mentioned, the same name can be "nicked" differently in various regions, making a "jupp" out of Josef in the Rhine area and a "Sepp" out of the very same name in Bavaria.

And the concept of abbreviating goes just throug all idioms. As you know, a Francisco in spanisch countries will always be a Paco; in Italy a Giovanni will be a Gianni, a Giuseppe a Beppe or Peppino or Pino, a Salvatore a Totó, and so on. Russians, too, are great in that. An Aleksandr is a Sasha, Mikhail a Misha, Wladimir a Wolodja or Wow, Katarina a Katja, Katjuscha, Katjuschenka...and that´s a very short list. Phantasy´s got no limits :wink:

Saludos,
Chris

Anthony
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Postby Anthony » 2002-08-16, 3:26

Hey Pat,

For me, my names are Tony, a shortening for Anthony, my real name. Some call me the Tex-Mex because I was born in Texas, although I'm not the least bit Mexican. A lot of people up here in the north of the U.S., or at least where I live are addressed by our last names. I'm usually called Rinna at school and I rarely call people by their first names. That's nicknames for ya up here.

Anthony
Anthony Rinna

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Postby Leviwosc » 2002-08-20, 23:21

I think it happen in each language. Also in the Netherlands.

Peter => Peer, Peet
Anna => An
Ronnie => Ron
Richard => Rich
Patricia => Pat
Trudie => Truus
Nellie => Nel
Dirk-Jan => D.J.
Pieter => Piet
Kees => Ko
Harry = Har


In the most cases we took the first part of the name to short the name.

The Dutch don't give there children real Dutch names. Its populair here to give your children very special names, names with a meaning in another language. A lot of African names. But also names from south Europe are very populair.

Regards
Ron

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-07-27, 17:45

I guess that, except for the 'standard' ones (such as Zé < José, Chico < Francisco, Tonico < Antônio, etc.), nicknames in Brazil are most often than not just one or two syllables taken from the name itself (most commonly the first one). Among my friends, here are some:

André > Dé / Dedé
Carolina > Carol
Fabiana > Fá
Fernanda > Fer / Fê / Nanda / Danda
Henrique > Rique
Jacqueline > Jack
Julianne > Ju / Júli
Leandro > Lê
Leonardo > Leo
Letícia > Lê / Léti
Lucileine > Lu
Marcel > Cell :)
Rafael > Rafa / Fael
Rafaela > Rafa
Raquel > Kell
Renata > Rê
Suzana > Su
Vinícius > Víni / Nícius
Viviane > Vi / Vivi / Vívi
etc.

As you can see, some people like spelling their nicknames in a more 'fancy' way. :twisted:

There are always those nicknames with 'obscure' origins, though, hehehe... Such as my friend Zô, whose name is actually Osvaldo. When he was little, he couldn't say his name and said 'Zozaldo', and it just got shortened. :P A friend of ours used to think he was called Zózimo, though. :shock:
Last edited by Psi-Lord on 2003-08-11, 18:36, edited 1 time in total.
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onelung
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lithuanian nicks

Postby onelung » 2003-08-04, 12:53

lithuanian nick are very influenced by russian language

lithuanian names: Vytis, Vytenis, Vytautas, Vytas.
one nick for them: Vycka.
Ruta-> Rutka
Ieva -> Ievke
Tomas -> Tomke
Neringa -> Nerka

if not russian then mostly just shorter version of name:

Gediminas -> Gedas
Mindaugas -> Minde
Rimvidas -> Rimvis -> Rimas
Povilas -> Povke (russian)
Pranciskus ->Pranas...
Leonas -> Levas
Kamile -> Kama

sometimes we make our names sound foreign

Kostas -> Kostia
Egle -> Jolka (egle/jolka -> fir)
Tomas -> Tomek
Juozas -> Dziuza
Aš jūsų visų nekenčiu!

ikr
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nicknames in catalan

Postby ikr » 2003-08-11, 17:45

There's much to say about nicknames in catalan, because we use to nickname everyone, especially in little towns, where everybody knows everybody.

It's usual to call someone for his surname or second name:

El Martines, El Llobet

There often are named houses, then you nickname some people by their house's name:

El de Cal Grill, "that from The Cricket House"

You can also nicknaming by his parents's name:

El Joan Xic, "Little John", Joan is not his name, but his father's.

Sometimes you take his name, supress the first syllabe and make a mixture with spanish:

El Tolu - Bartomeu, in spanish Bartolomé->Bartolo
El Sintu - Jacint, in spanish Jacinto
El Miliu - Emili, in spanish Emilio

And some people are nicknamed with full sentences, with ironic meanings. There are some examples that I've heard:

El semarruga, "he is wrinkling", because he was somewhat shy, coward.
El fotlifoc, "set it fire", because he had some pyromaniacal tendences.
El cincminuts, "five minutes", due to his (limited) skills when having sex...
El barradepà, "loaf of bread", due to his penis size.
El cacahuet, "peanut", also due to his penis size, the inverse meaning.
El misses, "masses", because he is a very religious person, and often goes to church.
El capdepà, "head made of bread", he was somewhat silly.

And a lot more...
Izena duen guztia omen da

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TaylorS
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Re: Nicknames

Postby TaylorS » 2008-12-22, 6:17

My usual nickname is "Selz" [sɛɫz], a shortening of my surname Selseth. a more "intimate" nickname used by family and by my girlfriend is "Tay" [teː] or "Tay-Tay" [teːteː]
Native: English
Learning: Spanish, Latin

Linguistic Interests: Historical Linguistics, Typology, Phonology, Phonetics, Morphology.

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Re: Nicknames

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-12-22, 6:35

Here people can get nicknames based on some random characteristic. There's this girl with long hair, people call her Pony. Then there's an overweight guy, people call him Poo.
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