True false friends 2

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Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-12-21, 5:08

Bubulus wrote:I'm pretty sure it's العالمون al-‘ālimūn, the active participle of the verb عالم ‘alima you mention, in the definite plural. The phrase quoted seems to be ألا علم العالمون, with the interjection ألا. I guess whatever little I know of Arabic is coming in handy. :P

Thanks!!

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Bubulus
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Bubulus » 2021-12-21, 11:34

Linguaphile wrote:
Bubulus wrote:I'm pretty sure it's العالمون al-‘ālimūn, the active participle of the verb عالم ‘alima you mention, in the definite plural. The phrase quoted seems to be ألا علم العالمون, with the interjection ألا. I guess whatever little I know of Arabic is coming in handy. :P

Thanks!!

That said, I asked an actual Arabist, and he suspects على علم العالمين ‘alā ‘ilm-i l-‘ālimīn would make more sense, with the preposition على. "Not an idiom I know", he says, though, also saying he'd "be very surprised though if andalusi arabic had retained -uun" (I imagine because contemporary spoken Arabic just have -īn). Furthermore, he notes العالمون al-‘ālimūn means 'the worlds' in religious contexts, notably attested in the opening of the Qur'an...

Maybe the author of the paper of the Actas is wrong...

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-12-21, 16:57

Bubulus wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
Bubulus wrote:I'm pretty sure it's العالمون al-‘ālimūn, the active participle of the verb عالم ‘alima you mention, in the definite plural. The phrase quoted seems to be ألا علم العالمون, with the interjection ألا. I guess whatever little I know of Arabic is coming in handy. :P

Thanks!!

That said, I asked an actual Arabist, and he suspects على علم العالمين ‘alā ‘ilm-i l-‘ālimīn would make more sense, with the preposition على. "Not an idiom I know", he says, though, also saying he'd "be very surprised though if andalusi arabic had retained -uun" (I imagine because contemporary spoken Arabic just have -īn). Furthermore, he notes العالمون al-‘ālimūn means 'the worlds' in religious contexts, notably attested in the opening of the Qur'an...

Maybe the author of the paper of the Actas is wrong...

Thanks, that's very interesting! The quote would not be contemporary, but rather old Arabic modified by Spanish-speakers. Arabic hasn't been widely used in Andalusia since the 15th-16th centuries. (The point being that even if the Arabic itself hasn't changed, the versions used by Spanish-speakers who did not know Arabic most likely did over the years - adapting it to better fit the names of citrus fruits in Spanish, for example. :mrgreen: ) But the Arabic origin could certainly be a folk etymology after all.

More false friends:
(es) chismosa gossip, a woman who gossips a lot
(es-CU) chismosa gossip, a woman who gossips a lot; kerosene lamp

(en) crystal type of solid material in which atoms and molecules are arranged in regular geometric patterns; transparent or semi-transparent mineral; high quality glass
(es) cristal type of solid material in which atoms and molecules are arranged in regular geometric patterns; transparent or semi-transparent mineral; window pane, pane of glass; lens

I've come across the bolded meanings before but still had to slow down and re-read to figure out what was going on here: La noche anterior me dediqué a ahumar un cristal que le quité a un cuadro que colgaba de la pared de mi cuarto de estudio. Lo hice empleando una chismosa que usábamos en los frecuentes apagones de la época. The context made it clear but I had to consciously re-adjust my mental image of the scene as I got to a un cuadro que colgaba de la pared and que usábamos en los frecuentes apagones. :mrgreen:

Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-12-27, 20:44

(es) carpeta folder, portfolio
(es-CU) carpeta reception desk
(es-MX) carpeta table covering
(en) carpet floor covering

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-12-29, 20:42

I thought this (or some variation of it) would have been posted before, but I can't find it.
(et) tapeet wallpaper (also: partitive plural is tapeete)
(es) tapete rug, carpet, tablecloth

The above two are the ones I tend to encounter and sometimes I have to stop and think about which is which if the context doesn't make it obvious (though it usually does), but the same issue exists in many other languages, for example:

(de) Tapete wallpaper
(pt) tapete carpet
(gl) tapete tablecloth
(ro) tapet wallpaper
(fur) tapêt carpet

(es) tapiz carpet, tapestry
(gl) tapiz tablecloth, tapestry

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-12-30, 20:00

(en) distended bloated, swollen due to pressure inside
(es) distendido relaxed, calm; (medical context) bloated, swollen due to pressure inside

It's an interesting one because the English meaning and the primary Spanish meaning (as well as the two Spanish meanings themselves) are basically opposites.

dle.rae.es/distender wrote:distender
1. tr. Aflojar, relajar o disminuir la tensión de algo. U. t. en sent. fig.
2. tr. Med. Causar una tensión violenta en un tejido, una membrana, etc. U. t. c. prnl.

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nijk
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby nijk » 2021-12-31, 15:50

Linguaphile wrote:
It's an interesting one because the English meaning and the primary Spanish meaning (as well as the two Spanish meanings themselves) are basically opposites.



In Italian it's the same as Spanish and it's confusing. A few months ago I had to have an abdomen ecography and the directions for the ecography said that the bladder had to be distesa, and I thought it meant empty. :lol: Luckily my mom is a nurse and explained to me what it meant.

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby OldBoring » 2022-01-01, 10:37

:shock:

Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2022-01-08, 17:16

nijk wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
It's an interesting one because the English meaning and the primary Spanish meaning (as well as the two Spanish meanings themselves) are basically opposites.

In Italian it's the same as Spanish and it's confusing. A few months ago I had to have an abdomen ecography and the directions for the ecography said that the bladder had to be distesa, and I thought it meant empty. :lol: Luckily my mom is a nurse and explained to me what it meant.

Nice example :D , bad time to have the confusion! :doggy:
:mrgreen:


(en) sparse not dense; meager; having widely spaced intervals
(es) esparcido widely scattered; widespread; festive; cheerful

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby vijayjohn » 2022-01-13, 23:28

German (de) kochen - to cook
Polish (pl) kochać - to love

h34
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby h34 » 2022-01-14, 15:48

(de) gekocht cooked < kochen
(nl) gekocht bought < kopen

Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2022-01-14, 18:37

(en) punctual on time, prompt
(es) puntual on time, prompt; accurate, unquestionable; occassional, unusual, isolated

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Re: True false friends 2

Postby vijayjohn » 2022-01-14, 22:01

h34 wrote:(de) gekocht cooked < kochen
(nl) gekocht bought < kopen

Just in case you're interested, linguoboy actually mentioned this in the earlier version of this thread.

Middle Dutch (nl_mid) belgen - to swell, get angry
Modern Dutch (nl) Belgen - Belgians

(Wiktionary claims that in Modern Dutch, belgen is an archaic term for 'to anger', and zich belgen is a dated term for 'to become angry').

h34
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby h34 » 2022-01-15, 7:56

vijayjohn wrote:
h34 wrote:(de) gekocht cooked < kochen
(nl) gekocht bought < kopen

Just in case you're interested, linguoboy actually mentioned this in the earlier version of this thread.

Thanks! I like that example sentence. :D

Linguaphile
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Re: True false friends 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2022-01-16, 17:33

(en) dilation expansion, enlargement; (obsolete) delay
(es) dilación delay; (obsolete) expansion, enlargement


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