Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

This is our main forum. Here, anything related to languages and linguistics can be discussed.

Moderator: Forum Administrators

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-05-17, 16:27

(pt-br) endossar - to endorse

The lack of the <r> in the cognate threw me.
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-05-31, 15:31

(pt-br) estafante - grueling, strenuous
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

User avatar
OldBoring
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 6066
Joined: 2012-12-08, 7:19
Real Name: Francesco
Gender: male
Location: Milan
Country: IT Italy (Italia)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby OldBoring » 2021-06-01, 11:14

Mano, tu aprende toda palavra dificil e inutil :P

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 6803
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-06-01, 19:44

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) endossar - to endorse


French endosser also means "endorse", but specifically in the sense of signing something, like a check, on the back.

Now for my words:

(fr)
ultracrépidarianisme nm - ultracrepidarianism, giving opinions on topics outside of one's knowledge
marche nordique nf - Nordic walking, a walking activity using special poles based on ski poles

The English terms are new to me as well.

Le Soir wrote:C’est un mot curieux et alambiqué, qui a fait irruption dans le débat public à l’été 2020 : l’ultracrépidarianisme, c’est-à-dire l’attitude qui consiste à parler, souvent avec assurance, de sujets sur lesquels on ne possède aucune compétence ni expertise.

It is a curious and convoluted word, which burst into the public debate during summer 2020: ultracrepidarianism, that is, the tendency to speak, often with confidence, about subjects in which one has no talent or expertise.


Moutiers Actus wrote:Un vaste programme d’[activités] est disponible auprès de l'office du tourisme : aromathérapie, concours photos, peinture sur bois et sur lauze, spectacles, yoga d[‍u] visage, marche nordique, ateliers culinaires, etc.

A wide range of activities is available from the tourism office: aromatherapy, photo competitions, wood and stone painting, shows, face yoga, Nordic walking, cooking workshops, and more.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

Linguaphile
Posts: 3495
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-01, 20:50

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr)
marche nordique nf - Nordic walking, a walking activity using special poles based on ski poles

I have always liked the Estonian word for this (kepikõnd, where kepp means "pole/cane/walking stick" and kõnd means walk). Very clear and to the point, compared to the English/French/etc words. It seems kepikõnd is just a calque of the Finnish (sauvakävely) and Swedish (stavgång) words for the same thing. (Although that in itself is interesting because Estonian does have cognates for both components of sauvakävely - sau & käimine - but doesn't use them here, using non-cognate synonyms instead.)

User avatar
Naava
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 1385
Joined: 2012-01-17, 20:24
Gender: female
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Naava » 2021-06-01, 22:25

Linguaphile wrote:(Although that in itself is interesting because Estonian does have cognates for both components of sauvakävely - sau & käimine - but doesn't use them here, using non-cognate synonyms instead.)

They do that to confuse Finns.

Linguaphile
Posts: 3495
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-01, 22:57

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(Although that in itself is interesting because Estonian does have cognates for both components of sauvakävely - sau & käimine - but doesn't use them here, using non-cognate synonyms instead.)

They do that to confuse Finns.

You mean you can't recognize the obvious similarities to käppä and kontti or kontata and immediately recognize it so that you automatically know "oh yeah, kepikõndi, käppäkontti, of course that must mean sauvakävely"?
:silly:

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-06-02, 8:33

OldBoring wrote:Mano, tu aprende toda palavra dificil e inutil :P


Aprendo as palavras que vêm! :)
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

User avatar
Naava
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 1385
Joined: 2012-01-17, 20:24
Gender: female
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Naava » 2021-06-02, 10:43

Linguaphile wrote:
Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(Although that in itself is interesting because Estonian does have cognates for both components of sauvakävely - sau & käimine - but doesn't use them here, using non-cognate synonyms instead.)

They do that to confuse Finns.

You mean you can't recognize the obvious similarities to käppä and kontti or kontata and immediately recognize it so that you automatically know "oh yeah, kepikõndi, käppäkontti, of course that must mean sauvakävely"?
:silly:

I know you're joking, but why käppä and not keppi (stick)? I mean, they're even cognates and mean the same in both languages. :hmm:

(also I'm not sure if you know but both käppä and kontti are so archaic that I had never heard either of them before. So, to answer your question, these are definitely the first words an average Finn would think of :lol:)

Linguaphile
Posts: 3495
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-02, 13:14

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(Although that in itself is interesting because Estonian does have cognates for both components of sauvakävely - sau & käimine - but doesn't use them here, using non-cognate synonyms instead.)

They do that to confuse Finns.

You mean you can't recognize the obvious similarities to käppä and kontti or kontata and immediately recognize it so that you automatically know "oh yeah, kepikõndi, käppäkontti, of course that must mean sauvakävely"?
:silly:

I know you're joking, but why käppä and not keppi (stick)? I mean, they're even cognates and mean the same in both languages. :hmm:

(also I'm not sure if you know but both käppä and kontti are so archaic that I had never heard either of them before. So, to answer your question, these are definitely the first words an average Finn would think of :lol:)

I was just trying to be silly. I came across kontata while looking to see if Finnish had any cognate to Estonian kõnd. The closest cognate set is kõndima/konata but while kõndima means "to walk," konata meant "to crawl on all fours". So the temptation to combine that with käpp ("paw" in Estonian and not archaic in Estonian; "stick" in Swedish and the sourceword word for Finnish keppi and Estonian kepp) was just too great. Yeah, it's a combination of archaic words (which is why I linked to Wiktionary), but the funny part is just that it changes "pole walking" into something like *"crawling around on paws like an animal" (sort of) and I found it just too good to pass up. But perhaps too weird, apparently.

User avatar
Naava
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 1385
Joined: 2012-01-17, 20:24
Gender: female
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Naava » 2021-06-02, 14:07

Linguaphile wrote: but the funny part is just that it changes "pole walking" into something like *"crawling around on paws like an animal" (sort of)

That's what I'd call nordic walking! It's especially popular at Midsummer or in the early morning when the bars have closed.

Linguaphile
Posts: 3495
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-02, 14:52

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote: but the funny part is just that it changes "pole walking" into something like *"crawling around on paws like an animal" (sort of)

That's what I'd call nordic walking! It's especially popular at Midsummer or in the early morning when the bars have closed.

:rotfl:

Linguaphile
Posts: 3495
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-03, 0:37

(hmn) tsis tas li no xwb not only that; that's not all
/ʈʂì tà li nɔ sɨ́/

(hmn) li no xwb os that's it; that's all
/li nɔ sɨ́ ɔ̀/

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-06-03, 10:31

(pt-br) enviezado - skewed
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 9232
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Osias » 2021-06-04, 2:48

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) enviezado - skewed


E também biased, já que bias é viés? Sei lá.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-06-04, 3:56

Osias wrote:
Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) enviezado - skewed


E também biased, já que bias é viés? Sei lá.


Cara, eu nem percebi que tinha "viés" escondido aí dentro! É verdade, faz mais sentido agora, obrigado!
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 25360
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Country: US United States (United States)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby vijayjohn » 2021-06-06, 3:14

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:
Osias wrote:
Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(pt-br) enviezado - skewed


E também biased, já que bias é viés? Sei lá.


Cara, eu nem percebi que tinha "viés" escondido aí dentro! É verdade, faz mais sentido agora, obrigado!

Não é enviesado?

French (fr) le DEA (diplôme d'études approfondies) - tertiary education degree higher than a master's but lower than a doctorate

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 9232
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Osias » 2021-06-06, 4:20

Eu me lembro de uma regra de que palavras derivadas tem s se tiver s na original e z caso contrário, mas não sei se já mudaram isso nas últimas retcons ortográficas.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Rí.na.dTeangacha
Posts: 205
Joined: 2020-12-31, 20:24
Gender: male
Location: Baile Átha Cliath, Éire
Country: IE Ireland (Éire / Ireland)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-06-06, 7:54

vijayjohn wrote:Não é enviesado?


Provavelmente foi. É que eu ouvi a palavra num vídeo, e já que não tinha percebido que contem "viés", eu devo ter escrito errado.
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24748
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2021-06-08, 1:50

(ca) moc de gall foxtail amaranth

(Literally, the name means "cock snot".)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


Return to “General Language Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest