Multilingual True Friends

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Vlürch
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Vlürch » 2019-08-25, 20:18

Naava wrote:Maybe they used the word kiro(t)?

Ohh, for some reason I didn't even know that. :o Interesting, thanks. I don't even know how long it has been since I learned a Finnish word, not counting derogatory slang used on Twitter...

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-27, 2:58

Romani (rom) daj [ˈd̪aj] - mother
Tamil (ta) தாய [ˈt̪aːjə] - mother

Malayalam also has തായ [ˈt̪aːja], but this is an outdated term in Malayalam and also apparently dispreferred since it's the specific term for 'mother' used in the word for 'motherfucker'.
Vlürch wrote:the nominalising suffix -us in Finnish is apparently a very recent development if I'm understanding Wiktionary correctly?

Where'd you get that impression? I tried looking in Wiktionary in both English and Finnish but didn't find that claim.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby razlem » 2020-01-06, 6:27

Greek (el) βάρβαρος foreign/non-Greek (Ancient Greek)
Choctaw (cho) balbaha foreign speech/foreigner/babbling

The Greek word is likely onomatopoeic for unintelligible/foreign languages. It turns out, the word for "foreign speech/babbling" in Choctaw is quite similar structurally- "balbaha" (used in the place name for New Orleans- Balbancha, "place where foreign languages are spoken"). Curious if other languages have similar forms for "foreigner" or "foreign language".
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-06, 9:25

razlem wrote:Curious if other languages have similar forms for "foreigner" or "foreign language".


Well, not for "foreign language" or "foreigner" but the Italian word for "stuttering" is balbuzie, and the Latin word for a stutterer is balbus (in Italian balbuziente).

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Luís
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Luís » 2020-01-06, 9:38

Synalepha wrote:Well, not for "foreign language" or "foreigner" but the Italian word for "stuttering" is balbuzie, and the Latin word for a stutterer is balbus (in Italian balbuziente).


In Portuguese balbuciar (same origin) means to babble, to talk in an incomprehensible way.
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-06, 9:44

Luís wrote:
Synalepha wrote:Well, not for "foreign language" or "foreigner" but the Italian word for "stuttering" is balbuzie, and the Latin word for a stutterer is balbus (in Italian balbuziente).


In Portuguese balbuciar (same origin) means to babble, to talk in an incomprehensible way.


We also have balbettare but it means "to stutter", while the Portuguese "balbuciar" would be blaterare in Italian.

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-01-06, 14:35

Synalepha wrote:
Luís wrote:
Synalepha wrote:Well, not for "foreign language" or "foreigner" but the Italian word for "stuttering" is balbuzie, and the Latin word for a stutterer is balbus (in Italian balbuziente).


In Portuguese balbuciar (same origin) means to babble, to talk in an incomprehensible way.


We also have balbettare but it means "to stutter", while the Portuguese "balbuciar" would be blaterare in Italian.


Spanish balbucear & balbucir: to stutter, stammer, babble, speak with difficulty

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linguoboy
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-30, 17:33

(haw) day
(ga) day

On a related note, "tomorrow" and "yesterday" are adverbial in both languages and need the addition of "day" in order to be nominalised, e.g. (haw) o ka lā ʻapōpō "tomorrow's", (ga) an lae amárach "idem.".
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2021-02-03, 18:43

Apparently, in Thai as in Malayalam and probably some other Dravidian languages (maybe other Tai-Kadai languages, too?), "[ba]!" means something like 'come along!'. I was pretty surprised when my Thai co-worker pointed this out.

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Rí.na.dTeangacha
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-04-25, 11:33

(ru) на - on
(pt-br) na - on the
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Osias » 2021-05-09, 14:17

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:(ru) на - on
(pt-br) na - on the
(feminine)
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

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Rí.na.dTeangacha
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Rí.na.dTeangacha » 2021-06-02, 8:43

Just saw this one in the Last Word in a Foreign Language That You Learned thread:

(et) käimine - walking
(es) caminar - to walk
(pt-br) caminhar - to walk
(pt-br)(ga)(ja) - Formerly Ciarán12

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-06-02, 14:01

Rí.na.dTeangacha wrote:Just saw this one in the Last Word in a Foreign Language That You Learned thread:

(et) käimine - walking
(es) caminar - to walk
(pt-br) caminhar - to walk

I hadn't ever thought of the similarity! But you're right. :waytogo: Käimine has a broader meaning though, with "walking" being just one of the meanings. It's from käima (stem käi-) - to walk, to go, to move, to go and return, go back and forth. (The suffix -mine functions here as a nominalizer to create gerund forms, like -ing in English).


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