Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

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Dormouse559
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-07-25, 3:20

(fr) boot nf - ankle boot, low-cut boot; a boot that hits between the ankle and the top of the calf
English meaning: "Boot" is name for the whole category, equivalent to French botte.

Partly as a note for myself: In the TV series where I heard the word, the speaker used the English plural /buts/.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-26, 18:11

(es) crac / crack [economic] crash, [stock market] crash

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Car » 2020-09-27, 8:50

Linguaphile wrote:(es) crac / crack [economic] crash, [stock market] crash

It also means something like star, champion, pro. E.g. I remember when I bought one of the sports newspapers in Catalonia, they repeatedly called Ronaldinho (yes, it's been some time) "el crack".

Speaking of a(n) (economic) crash, French uses krach for that while it's definitely not used in Germany any more (we use crash instead). It seems several languages loaned it from German, actually.
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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-27, 13:19

Car wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:(es) crac / crack [economic] crash, [stock market] crash

It also means something like star, champion, pro. E.g. I remember when I bought one of the sports newspapers in Catalonia, they repeatedly called Ronaldinho (yes, it's been some time) "el crack".

Now that I think about it, that one is a good "adapted Anglicism" as well; the meaning you mention comes from the English word crack (whereas the meaning I mentioned comes from the English word crash), but in the "very good, pro athlete" sense, in English uses it as an adjective while Spanish it as a noun.

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Re: Pseudo-Anglicisms, adapted Anglicisms

Postby Osias » 2020-09-29, 23:32

It's the same in Brazil, but the sports meaning got a localized spelling "craque".
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