Sámi course

User avatar
Ioannes
Posts: 1239
Joined: 2005-06-20, 13:33
Real Name: Sean Scully
Gender: male
Location: Oslo
Country: NO Norway (Norge)

Postby Ioannes » 2005-11-30, 16:33

Neither was the Norwegian forum. But the moderator is still doing a good job!

User avatar
eurooplane
Posts: 260
Joined: 2005-06-01, 15:33
Real Name: Alexis
Gender: male
Location: FR
Country: FR France (France)

Postby eurooplane » 2005-12-02, 18:10

Varislintu wrote:I don't think that matters (?). The Finnish forum, as far as I know, wasn't created by a fluent speaker, either (was it by Expugnator?) :). I think a Saami forum would be nice!
Yeah, and it could attract Saami native people visiting Unilang. :)

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 9:56

The Sámi VSL is now created.. the next step is to move this thread eh..

User avatar
eurooplane
Posts: 260
Joined: 2005-06-01, 15:33
Real Name: Alexis
Gender: male
Location: FR
Country: FR France (France)

Postby eurooplane » 2005-12-03, 11:44

Verb "to be"

You conjugate verbs in persons and tenses.
Now learn the present tense of "to be".

Leat - To be

I am - (Mun) lean
You are - (Don) Leat
S/he/It is - Lea

Are there plural forms in Saami? (we are,..)

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 13:59

There are and I'll teach them a bit later.

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 14:50

This is going to be a longer one..

Remeber the personal pronouns?
Mun, don, son (I, you, s/he)

What about these words?
boahtá, eallá, gii, dat, busse, manná


Goalmmát boddu - Third lesson
[koalmmaaht boddtu]

Máhtte [mahhte]: Maid don gulat?
Iŋgá: Skohter lea vissa.
Máhtte: De lea Juvvá.
Iŋgá: Juvvá dieđusge.
Máhtte: Do de boahtá. Juvvá dat vuodjá.

Máhtte: Juvvá, don dat vuoját.
Juvvá: Juo, mun dat vuoján.
Máhtte: Mot manná?
Juvvá: Bures dat manná. Mot don ealát?
Máhtte: Mun ealát dearvan.

- Gosa don manat?
- Leago hivsset?
- Dat lea olgun.
- Mun manan dohko.

Sánit:
goalmmát [koalmmaaht] - third
guossi [kuosssii] - a visitor
maid [majh] - what
gulat - you hear
skohter [skoohter] - a scooter, or mohtorgielká (Finnish loan).
De - you (plural)
dieđusge [tieđuuske] - of course
Juvvá dat [Juvvvaa đaht] - Juvvá it (as "Well Juvvá did that and that")
vuodjá [vuodžaa] - s/he drives
vuoját - you drive
vuoján - I drive
ealát [ealaht] - you live
mot don ealát? - how's your life = how are you?
ealán [ealaan] - I live
eallá [eallaa] - s/he lives
dearvan [tear^van] - (as) healthy (Finnish: terveenä)
de - now
gulan - I hear
gosa [kosa] - where
manat - you go
leago [leako] - is it
hivsset [hivsseht] - toilet
olgun [ol^kuun] - outside
manan - I go
dohko - there

Pronunciation note!

htt is pronounced as hht
hcc is pronounced as hhc
dj is similar to English j in John or Joan.

Schwa
It's a vowel that sounds a bit like a mix of every vowel. It appears always between these consonants:
lg - olgun [ol^kuun]
rd - girdi [kir^tii]
rv - dearvan [tear^van]
It tends to sound similar to consonants around it.

Verbs - Infinitive

The infinitive marker in Sámi is always -t. The verbs we have learnt so far end with at or it.

gullat - to hear
boahtit - to come
mannat - to go
eallit - to live
vuodjit - to drive

when we drop the infinitive marker away, we'll get the stem of the verb. Now it's easy to conjugate the verb in present singular.

gullat - to hear
the stem is gula-

I hear - Mun gula-n
You hear - Don gula-t
S/he hears - Son gullá (if you're wondering why the other l disappeared, look below)


Gradation = consonant changes

Oh yesss, this exists in Sámi too. Those who have learn Estonian or Finnish know what I'm talking about :P

When adding suffixes to a word, or conjugating a verb, sometimes we have to change the last consonant(s) a bit. For example:

Mannat - to go
I go: manan
You go: manat
S/he goes: manná

You see the weak state in first and second persons and the strong state in third.

I.e the infinitive and the 3rd person of singular or plural are always in strong state.

Gradation occurs in
- verbs with two syllables (gul-lat)
- some subtantives

Vowel changes in verbs

*only in verbs with two syllables!!*

with -it verbs (verbs ending with -it) i changes to á.
eallit: ealán, ealát, eallá.

with -at verbs the a changes to á in third person.
gullat: gulan, gulat, gullá

Bargobihtát

Post you answers into this thread.

1. Read aloud the text and translate them into English (on paper).

2. Fill in the right verb forms.

a) Gii do ... (comes) ?
b) Máret dat ... (comes).
c) Son ... (drives).
d) Já, don dat ... (you drive).
e) Juo (=yeah, yes), mun dat ... (i drive).
f) Na, mot ... (goes).
g) Mot don ... (are, live)?
h) Mun ... (i live) dearvan.
i) God Biret-Elle ... (is)?
j) Biret-Elle ... (is) olgun.

3. How would you answer?

a) Buore iđit.
b) Mot don ealát?
c) Mot Máret eallá?
d) Gii do boahtá?
e) Báze dearvan.

4. What is the question?

a) ....? - Mun ealán dearvan.
b) ....? - Hivsset lea olgun.
c) ....? - Mun dat vuoján.
d) ....? - Son eallá dearvan.

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 15:00

Lessons are now posted as seperated threads.

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2073
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Postby E}{pugnator » 2005-12-03, 15:24

Many thanks for this forum, Jonne!!!

Once again you are doing a wonderful job! You are really great in writing lessons, your lessons are very well-structured, I could see for the past finnish and arabic lessons, and know it's even better that you are givin us a Sami course.

I'd like to know which variety of Sami you are teaching here, I've heard they are very different, I think you should try not to mix up two varieties, that'd be really confusing.

Congratulations :D
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 16:10

Nice if you like them :D
I'm teaching the northern dialect of Sámi.. That's the one I know.. and it's the most spoken and understood one. Other dialects can be very different, like you mentioned..the pronunciation varies in a dialect too, from place to place...Like the dj sound; I always learnt it as dj, but some people pronounces it like a mix of d, y and j ?

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2073
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Postby E}{pugnator » 2005-12-03, 18:28

what about spelling? Is there a fixed spelling for this dialect you are teaching? Or are you using one among various spellings usually employed?
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-03, 20:46

There isn't one writing system for every Sámi dialect. Every dialect has their own rules for writing.

User avatar
Hunef
Posts: 9532
Joined: 2004-01-21, 20:55
Gender: male
Country: SE Sweden (Sverige)

Postby Hunef » 2005-12-04, 18:34

E}{pugnator wrote:what about spelling? Is there a fixed spelling for this dialect you are teaching? Or are you using one among various spellings usually employed?


I guess that the variety tought here is one of few sami languages which has a fixed spelling which is not based on the scandinavian alphabet. In South Sami spoken where I come from (Jamtland), there is no fixed spelling. It is written phonetically based on Norwegian or Swedish alphabets, depending on who is writing. (South Sami is spoken in both Norway and Sweden, and perhaps 1/4 of them in Jamtland - which means not more than 1,000.)
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

User avatar
Loiks
Posts: 3174
Joined: 2005-03-17, 16:17
Real Name: Lauri Laugen
Gender: male
Location: Tallinn
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Postby Loiks » 2005-12-04, 20:07

A point of discussion: are there five different languages or five dialects? As far as I know the speakers of different Saami languages don't understand each other.

Which Saami is that? Northern?

Ållu vuorrasamos diedojt bájkijs gånnå livalattja årru oadtju ulmusj gå Indrik-mujttogirjev Livlánda birra låhkå.

Although I don't know the exact pronunciation, it's sounds extremely beautiful to me too.

User avatar
Jonne
Posts: 1379
Joined: 2005-08-25, 15:15
Gender: male
Location: Oulu
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Postby Jonne » 2005-12-04, 20:44

You can call them dialects or languages.
And this dialect is not northern Sámi.. propably something spoken in norway..?

User avatar
Hunef
Posts: 9532
Joined: 2004-01-21, 20:55
Gender: male
Country: SE Sweden (Sverige)

Postby Hunef » 2005-12-18, 21:43

Here you can see the southern sami alphabet:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Sami

In the swedish version it says that about 500 speak Southern Sami. That probably mean that no more than a couple of hundred speak it in Jamtland, I am afraid. Among the sami languages, the southernmost dialects of Southern Sami are the most special and the most endangered. Personally I would aim for learning Southern Sami rather than Northern Sami (which is given in this course) in order to be solidaric. At the Jamtlandic library there are courses on Southern Sami and lots of books on the culture. (Since Jamtland is situated in the core area of the south samis.) I should borrow some material next time I visit it. The books about the South Sami language are situated very close to the books about the Jamtlandic language, so it wouldn't be much effort to look for some material about South Sami since I always browse through some books on Jamtlandic when I visit the library.

Note that Southern Sami spoken in Sweden is usually spelled with Ä/ä and Ö/ö instead of Æ/æ and Ø/ø, respectively, which is used on the norwegian side. (See the link above.) Also note that there are fewer letters in the Southern Sami alphabet than in the alphabet used fort the Northern Sami taught here.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

arutyl
Posts: 3
Joined: 2007-08-02, 19:10
Real Name: arutyl
Gender: male
Location: İzmir
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Postby arutyl » 2007-08-02, 19:41

Hi Jonne, Saami seems very difficult language but i want to learn, Suomi and Saami is it closer? Uralic languages, Turkish and Suomi, Hungarian, Saami have same structure, i hope i learn easly.

Some thing is interesting;

In Saami: Gii, İn Türkish: Kim (who?)

In Turkey's Turkish 'Ben' in other Turkic languages 'Men' means 'Mun' :)

I try to enter this site and try to learn Saami, i can find every opportunity time.

User avatar
Alcadras
Posts: 5508
Joined: 2005-04-16, 11:45
Real Name: Mirac Özdağ
Gender: male
Location: Ankara
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Postby Alcadras » 2007-08-05, 14:43

*Selam,şöyle söyleyim, Fince ve Sami dili benzer değildir. Tamamen farklıdır. Sami dilinin ortografisi ve telafuzu arapça gibidir, en azından benim kulağıma öyle geliyor. Zaten Fince ve Sami dili ortografilerine bakarsan aynı olmadıklarını görebilirsin. Gramatik açıdan da benzerlik yoktur. :wink:

*Shortly, I tried to explain that Sami and Finnish are not similar.

User avatar
Nero
Posts: 3111
Joined: 2006-01-28, 2:43
Real Name: Thomas Leser
Gender: male
Location: New York
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby Nero » 2007-08-05, 15:00

Alcadras, the two languages come from the same family...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sami_languages
coded in javverscript

User avatar
Alcadras
Posts: 5508
Joined: 2005-04-16, 11:45
Real Name: Mirac Özdağ
Gender: male
Location: Ankara
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Postby Alcadras » 2007-08-05, 15:04

Well, I didn't say they are not in same family. :wink: Just look at both languages' grammars. You'll see. :wink:

User avatar
Loiks
Posts: 3174
Joined: 2005-03-17, 16:17
Real Name: Lauri Laugen
Gender: male
Location: Tallinn
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Postby Loiks » 2007-08-05, 15:14

To some extent they are similar though. Saami languages are the nearest relatives to Finnic languages. I have watched Saami news on Finnish television (with Finnish subtitles), there are lots of similar words.

Btw, personal pronouns in some Turkic languages (Tatar, Kazakh, Uzbek that I checked) seem very similar to Finno-Ugric :).


Return to “Sami Languages”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests