Common mistakes of conlangers that piss you off

This forum is for constructed languages, both those invented by UniLang members and those already existing.

Moderators: Ashucky, Dormouse559

Wario Toad 32
Posts: 13
Joined: 2015-10-18, 18:53
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Common mistakes of conlangers that piss you off

Postby Wario Toad 32 » 2016-08-17, 15:10

Would it be better if I had E /E/ and Ë /e/. I currently have E for /e/ and Ë for /E/. But Ë could be EE so maybe I could have it as /e/ just like I have Ö /œ/ wh I could be spelled OE.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 19319
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Common mistakes of conlangers that piss you off

Postby linguoboy » 2016-08-17, 15:56

Wario Toad 32 wrote:Would it be better if I had E /E/ and Ë /e/. I currently have E for /e/ and Ë for /E/. But Ë could be EE so maybe I could have it as /e/ just like I have Ö /œ/ wh I could be spelled OE.

I don't understand what value "/E/" represents here. An open-mid front unrounded vowel? (IPA: ɛ [epsilon])
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Wario Toad 32
Posts: 13
Joined: 2015-10-18, 18:53
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Common mistakes of conlangers that piss you off

Postby Wario Toad 32 » 2016-09-01, 17:05

Yes. My biggest problem is when people have either too small phonology or too large. 6 to 10 vowels is a good amount. And maybe somewhere around 12 to 20 consonant sounds.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 19319
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Common mistakes of conlangers that piss you off

Postby linguoboy » 2016-09-01, 17:29

Wario Toad 32 wrote:Yes.

Plenty of languages use <e> for both /e/ and /ε/. Do these sounds contrast frequently in your language? Are there any predictable patterns to their appearance? (For instance, in most Romance languages, /ε/ is found only in stressed syllables.)

As for what diacritic would be best to distinguish them, that depends on the overall phonology of the language and what other diacritics are in use. For instance, doubling wouldn't be suitable if you contrast long and short vowels and an acute accent (<é>) could be confusing if you have phonemic stress, pitch, or tone.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


Return to “Conlangs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest