NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

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Raufoss
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 17:02

Velkommen til det norske språk forumet Ífaradà! :welcome:

Ífaradà wrote:A close friend:
1. Hun står meg nær.
2. Hun er en nær venn
3. Hun er en nær venn av meg.

A dear friend:
1. Hun er en kjær venn.
2. Hun er en kjær venn av meg.
Tusen takk for hjelpen! :y:

Ífaradà wrote:Also (not to be rude or disrespectful, as your Norwegian is awesome), you should drop the "som" in "jeg lurer på om noen av våre norske medlemmer har noen forslag?"
Takk for et godt forslag! :y:

For the past year we have been having a severe drought here in Southern California, but this morning it has actually been raining quite hard at times. What are some of the different ways one could write "It is raining very hard" på norsk?
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-04-01, 17:45

Raufoss wrote:Velkommen til det norske språk forumet Ífaradà! :welcome:

Ífaradà wrote:A close friend:
1. Hun står meg nær.
2. Hun er en nær venn
3. Hun er en nær venn av meg.

A dear friend:
1. Hun er en kjær venn.
2. Hun er en kjær venn av meg.
Tusen takk for hjelpen! :y:

Ífaradà wrote:Also (not to be rude or disrespectful, as your Norwegian is awesome), you should drop the "som" in "jeg lurer på om noen av våre norske medlemmer har noen forslag?"
Takk for et godt forslag! :y:

For the past year we have been having a severe drought here in Southern California, but this morning it has actually been raining quite hard at times. What are some of the different ways one could write "It is raining very hard" på norsk?

Thank you, and you're welcome!:)

Oh, yes indeed there is a phrase for that, two in fact: "det pøsregner" or "det regner i bøtter og spann".
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 18:10

Ífaradà wrote:Thank you, and you're welcome! :)
En spesiell takk til deg. :) Det er så fint å ha en annen forum medlem som snakker norsk. :y:

Ífaradà wrote:Oh, yes indeed there is a phrase for that, two in fact: "det pøsregner" or "det regner i bøtter og spann".
Would this be a correct way to use the first phrase in a sentence?

Denne morgenen det pøsregner i hele Sør-California!

This morning it is raining buckets throughout southern California.
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-04-01, 18:31

Raufoss wrote:
Ífaradà wrote:Thank you, and you're welcome! :)
En spesiell takk til deg. :) Det er så fint å ha en annen forum medlem som snakker norsk. :y:

Ífaradà wrote:Oh, yes indeed there is a phrase for that, two in fact: "det pøsregner" or "det regner i bøtter og spann".
Would this be a correct way to use the first phrase in a sentence?

Denne morgenen det pøsregner i hele Sør-California!

This morning it is raining buckets throughout southern California.
Nearly!

The correct way would be: "denne morgenen pøsregner det i hele Sør-California", or "denne morgenen regner det i bøtter og spann i hele Sør-California".

Since the sentence doesn't start with "det/it", then "det" will usually come after the verb.
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 18:44

Ífaradà wrote:Nearly!

The correct way would be: "denne morgenen pøsregner det i hele Sør-California", or "denne morgenen regner det i bøtter og spann i hele Sør-California".

Since the sentence doesn't start with "det/it", then "det" will usually come after the verb.
Tusen takk for god forklaring! :y:

I just corrected what I had posted earlier in the "La oss snakke om været/Let's talk about the weather!" thread yet again. :oops:

Can both expressions "det pøsregner" and "det regner i bøtter og spann" be translated to English as "raining buckets"?
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-04-01, 19:06

Raufoss wrote:
Ífaradà wrote:Nearly!

The correct way would be: "denne morgenen pøsregner det i hele Sør-California", or "denne morgenen regner det i bøtter og spann i hele Sør-California".

Since the sentence doesn't start with "det/it", then "det" will usually come after the verb.
Tusen takk for god forklaring! :y:

I just corrected what I had posted earlier in the "La oss snakke om været/Let's talk about the weather!" thread yet again. :oops:

Can both expressions "det pøsregner" and "det regner i bøtter og spann" be translated to English as "raining buckets"?
You're very welcome:)

Indeed it can be translated to the English "raining buckets" idiom. Pøs, bøtte and spann all mean bucket, though slightly different sorts of buckets.

Really love your enthusiasm!:)
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 19:30

Ífaradà wrote:Indeed it can be translated to the English "raining buckets" idiom. Pøs, bøtte and spann all mean bucket, though slightly different sorts of buckets.
Tusen takk for det! :y:

I haven't been able to find a translation for pøs in any of the Norsk-Engelsk Ordbøker that I've checked so far, but it looks like both bøtte and spann can be translated into English as either "bucket" or "pail."

Ífaradà wrote:Really love your enthusiasm! :)
Tusen takk! :)
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-04-01, 19:56

Raufoss wrote:
Ífaradà wrote:Indeed it can be translated to the English "raining buckets" idiom. Pøs, bøtte and spann all mean bucket, though slightly different sorts of buckets.
Tusen takk for det! :y:

I haven't been able to find a translation for pøs in any of the Norsk-Engelsk Ordbøker that I've checked so far, but it looks like both bøtte and spann can be translated into English as either "bucket" or "pail."

Ífaradà wrote:Really love your enthusiasm! :)
Tusen takk! :)
Pail, yeah!:) Actually had to google that >.<

Pøs is an old word borrowed from Low German, not really in common use anymore, apart from in the expression "pøsregne".
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 20:18

Ífaradà wrote:Pail, yeah!:) Actually had to google that >.<
I don't think the word "pail" is used much in British English, but here in the U.S. "bucket" and "pail" are for the most part synonymous. Personally I prefer using the word "bucket" too, but a smaller plastic "bucket" that a child takes to the beach is typically called a "pail" (at least here in Southern California).

Ífaradà wrote:Pøs is an old word borrowed from Low German, not really in common use anymore, apart from in the expression "pøsregne".
Takk for det! Kanskje mine norske venner og familie skal bli veldig imponert hvis jeg bruk pøsregner i en setning. :)
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-04-01, 20:53

Raufoss wrote:
Ífaradà wrote:Pail, yeah!:) Actually had to google that >.<
I don't think the word "pail" is used much in British English, but here in the U.S. "bucket" and "pail" are for the most part synonymous. Personally I prefer using the word "bucket" too, but a smaller plastic "bucket" that a child takes to the beach is typically called a "pail" (at least here in Southern California).

Ífaradà wrote:Pøs is an old word borrowed from Low German, not really in common use anymore, apart from in the expression "pøsregne".
Takk for det! Kanskje mine norske venner og familie skal bli veldig imponert hvis jeg bruk pøsregner i en setning. :)
Oh, that's quite interesting actually! Love learning new words.

They'll be impressed for sure!
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-01, 21:11

Ífaradà wrote:Oh, that's quite interesting actually! Love learning new words.
One of the many differences between British English (BE) and American English (AE) is that children in England bring "a bucket and a spade" with them to the beach, but here in Southern California we call the same thing a "a pail and a shovel."

Ífaradà wrote:They'll be impressed for sure!
Takk! :y:
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby salieri » 2014-04-18, 20:59

Eg har ikkje vori her på lenge, men det e godt å sjå at du fortsatt e her Raufoss. :D

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Raufoss » 2014-04-20, 21:29

salieri wrote:Eg har ikkje vori her på lenge, men det e godt å sjå at du fortsatt e her Raufoss. :D
Jeg setter pris på de hyggelige ordene. :y:

Image

Vi håper å se deg her igjen snart!
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby salieri » 2014-04-21, 20:57

Eg kjem nok te å stikke innom her innimellom, sjølv om eg jobbar mykje. Me snakkas.

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby salieri » 2014-07-04, 20:13

Er det greit å si Dette er et symbol på Oslo.? Er litt usikker på om jeg skal bruke
eller av eller noe annet i denne setningen!? Noen som kan hjelpe meg?

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby EinarJ » 2014-07-09, 5:17

"av" er iallefall feil, og ville i mitt hode bety noe i retningen "noe som har ramlet ned fra Oslo". I hvilken sammenheng bruker du uttrykket?

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby salieri » 2014-07-09, 18:41

Jeg lurer rett og slett på hvordan man sier a symbol of Oslo på norsk? Jeg er ganske sikker på at det heter et symbol på Oslo, men vil gjerne være 100% sikker på det.

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-07-13, 10:51

salieri wrote:Jeg lurer rett og slett på hvordan man sier a symbol of Oslo på norsk? Jeg er ganske sikker på at det heter et symbol på Oslo, men vil gjerne være 100% sikker på det.
Kommer litt an på hva du egentlig mener. Det er en vesentlig forskjell i betydning her.

Den mest nøyaktige oversettelsen ville vært "et Oslosymbol". Når man sier "et symbol på Oslo" så fremhever det en slags kontekstbasert betydning. Altså: frihet har blitt et symbol på Oslo, mens "et Oslosymbol" er mye friere i den sammenhengen.
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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby salieri » 2014-07-15, 14:20

Ok. Hvordan ville du da oversatt følgende setning;

The Vigeland Park is a well known symbol of Oslo.

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Postby Ífaradà » 2014-07-15, 15:08

Vigelandsparken er et av Oslos mest kjente landemerker/severdigheter.
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