Basque culture

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jaled
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Interesting

Postby jaled » 2007-04-01, 21:14

Thank you very much, Zoroa. Yes, I understood it.

So, we can say that the Northern part is under French rule and the Southern one under Spanish rule?

Talking about the budget percentages, it seems France, as a state, is supporting the basque language.

Have a nice day.

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elxiquet
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Postby elxiquet » 2007-05-06, 16:09

elxiquet wrote:I am interested about relation between people of EH in France and in Spain. Is there a fluent comunication between them? (i mean, they/you feel as one single comunity?)

Related to that question, how do spanish-speaking basques and french-speaking basques understand each other (if they don't speak basque, of course).

Thank you!


No one wants to answer my question :cry: :cry:

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Postby arabarra » 2007-06-14, 16:07

Hi Elxiquet!

I would say that basque speaking basques tend quite naturally to see both sides of the boundary as one unique community (or at least as two clearly differenced aspects of one unique community). For not basque speakers, I guess this correlates with one's political options: the more nationalist, the stronger the perception of the Basque Country as an homogeneous entity...

Personally, I have a strange feeling when I speak with french basques (that do not speak basque)... we have a lot of common cultural references, but still the differences are also equally visible...

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Postby elxiquet » 2007-06-15, 18:10

eskerrik asko for the answer arabarra :wink:

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0stsee
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Batua

Postby 0stsee » 2007-11-20, 2:40

Is it true that Euskara Batua is to some extent "artificial"?


Btw, is it Euskara or Eskuara or Euskera or Eüskera?? :?
Ini tandatanganku.

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nannerl
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Re: Batua

Postby nannerl » 2007-11-20, 16:31

0stsee wrote:Is it true that Euskara Batua is to some extent "artificial"?


Btw, is it Euskara or Eskuara or Euskera or Eüskera?? :?


I'll try to answer you, and I'm sure that later Arrabarra will have the pleasure of correct my message -even in English- ^^

I heard that Euskara Batua is a mix of all the dialects, so obviously, an artificial way of Euskara. I think people in villages or alone houses in the mountains speak still in their own dialect, but in cities they speak Batua. Am I right? ^^
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arabarra
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Postby arabarra » 2007-11-20, 18:17

Hi guys!

Nannerl was two times right today... firstly, yes, she correctedly foresaw that I would be pleased to answer. And secondly, also yes, her explanation about batua is more or less correct.

I would only add a few clarifications. Native speakers most commonly use their dialect (or some mildered form of it) in their personal life. The main goal of batua is to provide standards to articulate official and public life: mass media oriented to the whole Basque Country use the "batua" forms, so as do Government and political parties in their communications. Education in Basque employs customarily batua, and language examinations required to work in the administration refer to batua.

Additionally, non-native speakers of basque tend to use batua in their social life... and one interesting result hereof is an incoming generation of "native batua speakers", children from families where both parents have learned basque and consquently use batua rather than dialects at home. And this is not a rare phenomenon... (I even know a case where the father comes from Algeria and the baby speaks a perfect basque with nice batua-forms).

The official name of the language in batua is "Euskara". "Euskera", "Uskera", "Uskeria", "Üskera" (and still some more) are dialectal variations

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Postby nannerl » 2007-11-20, 21:09

Basque seems me more amazing day by day :<3: I'm really decided to learn it! Well, now even more, because a friend told to a casting manager that his mate (this means, me) speaks Catalan, Spanish, English, French, Basque and that I'm learning Chinese... So I don't want him to look like a liar! xD
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0stsee
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Danke!

Postby 0stsee » 2007-11-20, 23:34

Thanks a lot for your infos, guys!

So there are no signs of Basque declining use as colloquial language?
Ini tandatanganku.

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Postby Zoroa » 2007-11-21, 4:46

As a colloquial and formal language, no. Basically batua is a language that was created as a means for uniting declining basque dialects. Now with this central pillar, the dialects have gained momentum again.

Zoroa ;)
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Postby cameron » 2007-11-26, 14:39

damu dut. I am sorry.
There is more Euskara around and so evidently is Zoro'. I haven't yet grasped where everything is in Unilang.


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